Golf Buzz

September 18, 2014 - 9:43am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
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Cigar Guy
Mark Pain/Daily Mail UK
This is a fascinating picture of Tiger Woods at the 2010 Ryder Cup, but the man with the mustache and the cigar stole the show.

In just eight days, the 40th Ryder Cup gets underway from Gleneagles in Scotland. We cannot wait.

With today being Thursday (#throwbackthursday), we figured we'd throw it back to the 2010 matches at Celtic Manor in Wales and one of the most fantastic and comical photos ever taken.

Mark Pain from the Dail Mail produced the snap you see above that was a viral sensation.

First of all, the photo is spectacular, as it looks like the golf ball struck by Tiger Woods is about to smash into the camera's lens. That alone makes it awesome.

However, talk about stealing the thunder! Check out the guy to the right with the mustache, wig and cigar. How funny is that?

The Daily Mail tracked down the man behind the costume shortly after those matches.

You can click here to read the story.

As it turns out, the man -- Rupesh Shingadia -- was merely trying to show his support for the European Team and this was his spin on dressing like Miguel Angel Jimenez.

We're not sure he pulled that off... but the photo is unforgettable nonetheless. 

September 18, 2014 - 8:16am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Justin Leonard
Getty Images
Justin Leonard celebrates after making a crucial putt on the 17th green at the Country Club in the Sunday singles matches at the 1999 Ryder Cup.

Things looked grim in the last Ryder Cup of the 20th century for a U.S. team that trailed 10-6 heading into Sunday's singles matches at The Country Club in Brookline, Mass., in 1999.

It was at this very golf course where amateur and local boy Francis Ouimet, at age 20, was the surprise winner of the 1913 U.S. Open, outlasting legends Harry Vardon and Ted Ray in a playoff. So, if ever there were a course where the unlikely could happen, The Country Club was it.

On the eve of that final day, U.S. Captain Ben Crenshaw -- ever the optimist -- said this before exiting the media center: "I'm going to leave y'all with one thought, and then I'm going to leave. I'm a big believer in fate. I have a good feeling about this. That's all I'm going to tell you."

Crenshaw clearly knew something the rest of the world didn't. On that Sunday, his U.S. team overcame the largest final-day deficit to win back the Ryder Cup (Europe matched the comeback in 2012), 14 1/2-13 1/2.

It marked the first U.S. Ryder Cup win since 1993 and is one of only two U.S. victories in the last nine played.

Relive that magical Ryder Cup with this day-by-day breakdown:

Lion's Den Golf Club
Lion's Den Golf Club
John Daly has owned Lion's Den Golf Club since 1995.
It's no secret that times are tough at some golf courses around the country. On Wednesday, John Daly broke the news that his Lion's Den Golf Club in Dardenelle, Arkansas – the course he owns and where he lives – is in financial trouble.
 
"Have to shut doors and sell my golf course Lions Den really sad day," he tweeted, adding the hashtag: #notenoughmembers
 
Daly didn't provide any details, and my call to the club Wednesday night went unanswered, so I don't know any more than what Daly said in his tweet. The link from Daly's website to the club is already down.
 
 
Lion's Den is an 18-hole semi-private course northwest of Little Rock that stretches about 6,400 yards form the back tees. Designed by Jerry O'Neill, it opened in 1969. Golfers who rated the course on GolfLink.com gave it an average of 3.9 out of 5 stars.
 
Over at GolfNow.com, the course is described as "fun," and lists tee times as $40 on weekends.
 
Daly's decision must have been one of the toughest he's ever made – after all, he learned to play golf as a kid at Lion's Den, which back then was a nine-hole course known as Bay Ridge Golf Club. Daly bought it in 2005 – granting his mother's wish that he would one day own it.
 
The Golf Channel paid a visit to Lion's Den a few years ago while filming the show, "Being John Daly." You can see the three-minute clip below.
 
 
Greg Norman
Greg Norman via Instagram
Greg Norman was out and about soon after his chainsaw accident, but his left hand remains bandaged after surgery to repair nerve damage.
The scariest story of the week in golf has to be Greg Norman's near-disaster with a chainsaw last Saturday while trimming trees at his Jupiter Island, Florda, compound.
 
After his trip to the hospital, the Shark was up and around almost immediately, thankful that his injury wasn't worse than it as.
 
And, he has admitted, he had a weird feeling before he went out to work.
 
"I had a premonition, to tell you the truth, as I was getting my chainsaw ready that something bad was going to happen," Norman told Frank Keogh of the BBC. "I had this premonition and almost pulled out of it, but I thought it's not a big tree, not a real difficult task to do.
 
"We all have premonitions. That one was just unusually prophetic, I guess," he added. "I nearly didn't go down and chainsaw. The moral of the story is to trust your internal mechanism." 
 
Norman explained that he was almost finished with his chainsawing chores for the day when the accident occurred. 
 
 
"I was about four branches from being done, and there was one branch about chest high and I cut through and took my finger off the trigger," he said. "The branch was just about ready, was falling straight down, and I went to grab it with my left hand, but it was a little heavier than I anticipated. 
 
"The weight took my arm, right above where you wear your watch on your left wrist, and took it right into the chains as it was spooling down," he added. 
 
"I was very lucky in a lot of ways," he admitted. "If the chainsaw was going at full speed, my hand would have been cut off, and it missed my ulna nerve and muscles, so I was extremely, extremely lucky in that regard, by fractions of millimeters." 
 
After the accident, Norman and his family rushed to the hospital, where a hand surgeon performed a one-hour procedure to repair some nerve damage. He hopes to be healed enough to play in a celebrity tournament in China at the end of October.
 
"I've already started doing my own rehabbing exercises by putting the index finger of my right hand into my left hand and gripping it like a golf club, squeezing my top three fingers," he said. "If my recovery allows me to getting back to hitting balls in three weeks, I think I'll be back with a putter in my hand, maybe a chipper just to see how I feel. 
 
"That's Greg Norman's word for it, though," he admitted, "not the doctor's." 
 
September 17, 2014 - 12:59pm
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Miguel Angel Jimenez
YouTube
Miguel Angel Jimenez recently put his spin on the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.

OK, so it's been a little while since we posted a good Ice Bucket Challenge video.

Somehow, someway, this one slipped through the cracks. Don't worry, we're investigating how that happened.

The Most Interesting Golfer in the World -- Miguel Angel Jimenez -- took the challenge in late August after being called out by Henrik Stenson.

ICE BUCKET CHALLENGES: Tom Watson | Tiger & Rory | George W. Bush | U.S. Ryder Cup team

But, he didn't use a measly little bucket. Instead, cigar in mouth, Jimenez was doused with what looks like a 32-gallon trash can.

Here it is:

In case you missed it there, yes, Jimenez nominated a bull fighter to take the challenge -- so Miguel Angel Jimenez of him to do that.

September 17, 2014 - 9:50am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Adam Scott, Steve Williams
USA Today Sports Images
After three years, a Masters win and ascending to No. 1 in the world, Adam Scott has parted ways with caddie Steve Williams.

After a three-year partnership that resulted in Adam Scott becoming the first Australian-born winner of the Masters, the former World No. 1 and caddie Steve Williams have parted ways.

Scott made the announcement in a statement released Wednesday morning.

"Steve has been an integral part of my team in a period where I have fulfilled some of my lifetime golfing goals," Scott said in a statement. "His dedication and professionalism have been without question, and his friendship is highly valued. Our priorities and stages of life are different now, and so we decided that this is the best time to end our partnership."

Scott hired Williams in 2011 shortly after Tiger Woods fired Williams after winning 13 majors together.

Williams has said over the last year that he was going to cut back on his caddie responsibilities soon to move home to his native New Zealand to spend more time with his family.

PGATour.com's Brian Wacker had this from Williams after Scott's decision to cut ties:

"After discussing this in detail with Adam it became evident that my plan was not going to fit with Adam's requirements and so we decided to end our partnership," Williams said. "Having caddied for the first Australian to win the Masters is a career highlight and a memory I will cherish forever. If the right opportunity arose I would consider caddying on a part time basis in the future."