Golf Buzz

November 20, 2013 - 2:03pm
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
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In today's golf tip, PGA Professional Wayne Defrancesco demonstrates an easy way to improve your pitch shots -- and it's all about the stance you take. Watch the video below to see what tips Defrancesco offers up that will help your game.

November 20, 2013 - 10:41am
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PGA of America
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2014 PGA Championship
PGA of America
In August 2014, Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Ky., will play host to the PGA Championship.

The PGA Championship -- the Season's Final Major -- celebrates its 96th anniversary in 2014 with a return visit to Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Ky.

Thousands of golf fans lined the fairways during the sold-out 1996 PGA Championship to view the strongest, all-professional international field in Major Championship golf. In August 2014, all eyes will be focused on Valhalla once again as 156 of the best players in the world compete for the coveted Wanamaker Trophy.

CLICK HERE TO BUY TICKETS TO THE 2014 PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

Tickets will be available as inventory allows. Demand is anticipated to be very high, so we strongly encourage you to order your tickets as soon as possible.

Tickets may be purchased online; or, by dialing 1-800-PGA-GOLF, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., EST.
 

Categories: Valhalla Golf Club
November 19, 2013 - 6:13pm
Posted by:
John Holmes
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Bobby Clampett
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Bobby Clampett, 53, has become the third PGA Professional to graduate from the new PGA Master Professional Program 2.0 – the highest educational designation a PGA member can attain.

Most of us know Bobby Clampett for his 15 years on the PGA Tour player and, more recently, a couple years on the Champions Tour, along with his work as a golf analyst for CBS, TNT and the Golf Channel. Now, though, he's added a new achievement: He's a PGA Master Professional in Teaching and Coaching.

Clampett, 53, has become the third PGA Professional to graduate from the new PGA Master Professional Program 2.0 – the highest educational designation a PGA member can attain.

"It is a distinct honor, as a member of the PGA Tour, to receive the PGA Master Professional designation, particularly since instruction is so close to my heart," said Clampett, who lives in Bonita Springs, Fla. "This also is a significant milestone for me, one that commemorates my development of Impact-Based teaching, as presented in my book, 'The Impact Zone,' and my new video series, 'The Impact-Zone Training System, ' which started me on the path to completing the PGA Master Professional program. 

''My primary goal is for all golfers to understand how to improve faster and easier and enjoy the game more."

TIP OF THE DAY: PGA's Ron Philo Jr. on how to hit a bunker shot from an uneven lie

The PGA Master Professional Program is available to PGA Professionals who have earned advanced certification through the PGA Certified Professional Program, which was launched in 2004. After a PGA member obtains PGA Certified Professional status, he or she is eligible to work toward a Master Professional designation by preparing a special project approved by a panel of examiners from the PGA Education Department. The applicant then presents the project to a panel and defends his or her methodology.

The curriculum is comprised of an extensive project based on the specific certification that the PGA member has acquired. The project includes a detailed demonstration overseen and evaluated by PGA Master Professionals, PGA Subject Matter Experts and professional testing consultants. A PGA member becomes a Master Professional upon approval of the project and successful completion of a presentation (which includes a Live Lesson for the Teaching & Coaching Certification).

The program requires a minimum of eight years of PGA membership in order to be eligible to earn PGA Master Professional status.

 

November 19, 2013 - 11:42am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture

In today's golf tip, PGA Professional Ron Philo, Jr., talks about how get the best result from a shot out of an uneven bunker lie. Philo demonstrates how he goes about finding a stable position to swing from, setting up the stance, choking up on the club and making the proper swing.

November 19, 2013 - 11:25am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
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Chi Chi Rodriguez
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Chi Chi Rodriguez performs his famous air sword fight.

If you've seen Golf Channel's show "Big Break" then you're familiar with the glass break challenge, where contestants attempt to fire a low, stinger through something resembling a window pane.

Puerto Rican golf star Chi Chi Rodriguez made a guest appearance on "Big Break NFL Puerto Rico" (the episode airs tonight) and decided to try out the challenge for himself. This is cutting room floor material you have to see to believe.

READ: New visual evidence rules in golf

When Rodriguez attempts the glass break challenge, it backfires in a big and uncomfortable way. See for yourself in the video below.

Ouch! But, pro that he is, Chi Chi responded by breaking the glass on the next swing and then giving us all the famous air sword fight.

Well done.

Follow T.J. Auclair on Twitter, @tjauclair.
 

November 19, 2013 - 10:49am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
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Tiger Woods
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A rule that cost Tiger Woods a two-shot penalty in September, will not be cause for a penalty beginning Jan. 1, 2014.

The USGA and the R&A released a statement today concerning their ongoing review of the use of video and other visual evidence in administering the Rules of Golf.

The new rule, called Decision 18/4, will take effect Jan. 1, 2014 and significantly reduces the chance of a "call-in" of rules infractions.

Most recently -- and perhaps most famously -- Tiger Woods was handed a two-shot penalty at the BMW Championship in September when his ball moved as he attempted to remove a loose impediment. Woods maintained that the ball oscillated, but didn't change position. An HD video replay showed otherwise resulting in the two-shot penalty.

RELATED: Henrik Stenson pulls off historic double

Under the new rule, if a player doesn't see the ball move with the naked eye -- regardless of video evidence -- the player will not be penalized.

The statement reads in part:

New Decision 18/4 will provide that, where enhanced technological evidence shows that a ball has left its position and come to rest in another location, the ball will not be deemed to have moved if that movement was not reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time. The Decision ensures that a player is not penalized under Rule 18-2 in circumstances where the fact that the ball had changed location could not reasonably have been seen without the use of enhanced technology.

Beyond these Decisions, as part of the 2016 Rules review, the Rules of Golf Committees will be discussing other issues concerning the possible effect of video technology on the application of the Rules to the playing of the game, such as the necessary degree of precision in marking, lifting and replacing a ball, the estimation of a reference point for taking relief, and the overall question of the appropriate penalty for returning an incorrect score card where the player was unaware that a penalty had been incurred. As is true of the rules in many other televised sports, adapting to developments in technology and video evidence is an important ongoing topic in making and applying the Rules of Golf.

Follow T.J. Auclair on Twitter, @tjauclair.