Golf Buzz

May 18, 2016 - 10:25am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Jordan Spieth
@PGATOUR on Twitter
During a clinic at the AT&T Byron Nelson Championship on Tuesday, Jordan Spieth pulled off an impressive trick shot that involved catching a marshmallow in his mouth.

Over the last two years, we've seen our share of incredible trick shots here at PGA.com.

But, what Jordan Spieth did on Tuesday during a clinic at the AT&T Byron Nelson Championship was pretty darned impressive.

The two-time major champion placed a marshmallow on top of his golf ball. From there, he opened the face on a wedge and proceeded to hit a half-shot. As soon as the club made contact with the ball, the marshmallow shot straight into the air.

That's where this trick-shot developed its "wow!" moment.

Spieth zigged and zagged and eventually fell down -- all the while positioning himself perfectly -- to catch the marshmallow in his mouth.

Check it out:

 

It was reminiscent of this "candy" shot nearly one year ago by Brittany Lincicome (who pulled it off with more grace than Spieth, but without the swarms of fans):

 

Candy on top of ball trick. Take 1. Got it Hahahaha. Funny @dewald_gouws @trevthemachoman

A video posted by Brittany Lincicome (@brittany1golf) on

 

May 18, 2016 - 8:52am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Andrew Novak
@WoffordTerriers on Twitter
In the second round of a men's DI NCAA Regional on Tuesday, Wofford College's Andrew Novak holed a 100-foot birdie putt.

A NCAA Division I Men's Golf Regional is taking place in Tuscaloosa, Ala. this week.

In Tuesday's second round, Wofford junior Andrew Novak -- playing in the individual competition -- recorded what was easily the shot of the day and may even prove to be the shot of the tournament.

RELATED: NCAA.com's men's golf coverage

Faced with a 100-foot birdie put on the 18th hole at Ol' Colony Golf Course -- his ninth hole of the day -- Novak was likely trying to figure out ways to get down in two and avoid the dreaded three-putt bogey.

Instead, he did this with a cellphone camera rolling:

 

That's a 100-foot birdie. With that, Novak made the turn in 2 under. He was 2 over on his back nine and carded an even-par 72 that had him sitting T14 through two rounds.  

Condoleezza Rice
USA Today Sports Images
KPMG today announced 66th U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and LPGA Legend and Entrepreneur Annika Sorenstam will keynote the 2016 KPMG Women’s Leadership Summit in June

NEW YORK, May 17 -- KPMG today announced 66th U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and LPGA Legend and Entrepreneur Annika Sorenstam will keynote the 2016 KPMG Women’s Leadership Summit in June, joining a group of highly-accomplished leaders in the worlds of business, sports, and the media. This distinguished lineup of speakers and panelists includes: KPMG U.S. Chairman and CEO Lynne Doughtie; KPMG Global Chairman John Veihmeyer; Microsoft CFO Amy Hood; Facebook VP of Engineering, building8, Regina Dugan; Concur President Elena Donio; Intel Data Center Executive Vice President and General Manager Diane Bryant; LPGA Tour champion golfer Stacy Lewis; Olympic Gymnastics Gold Medalist Shawn Johnson; Olympic Basketball Gold Medalist Lisa Leslie; and Olympic Soccer Gold Medalist Megan Rapinoe.

The KPMG Women’s Leadership Summit, hosted on-site during the week of the 2016 KPMG Women’s PGA Championship, brings together today’s most accomplished leaders from multiple arenas to inspire the next generation of women leaders.

“The goal of our Summit is to increase the number of women in the C-suite by empowering the next generation of women leaders to reach their highest aspirations and potential,” said KPMG’s Doughtie. “And we are so very pleased to bring together a remarkable group of leaders, representing many fields and industries, who will share their perspectives on how women can move forward with great confidence and resolve.”

KPMG Women’s Leadership Summit Speakers and Panels:

-- Rice will provide the opening keynote and share personal leadership experiences from working with top world leaders, and advice for the next generation of women leaders including the importance of philanthropy and “paying it forward.”

-- Sorenstam will participate in the closing fireside chat. She will share personal experiences of breaking the glass ceiling in business and golf.

-- Hood and Veihmeyer will participate in a panel titled “C-Suite Insights.” The panel will focus on leading in a fast-changing global marketplace.

-- Bryant, Donio, and Dugan will participate in a panel titled “Visionary Leadership.” The discussion will focus on embracing innovation.

-- Johnson, Leslie, Lewis, and Rapinoe will share personal stories of resiliency and thriving under pressure in a panel discussion titled “Achieving the Dream in Your Personal and Professional Life”

NBC’s Sunday Night Football Sideline Reporter Michele Tafoya will serve as the master of ceremonies. Sessions will be moderated by NBC on-air talent including: NBC News and MSNBC Business Correspondent Olivia Sterns, CNBC Contributor Deirdre Bosa, and NBC Sports Play-by-Play Host Terry Gannon.

The KPMG Women’s Leadership Summit will be available via live streaming at CNBC.com and Golf Live Extra, Golf Channel’s live streaming platform.

The KPMG Women’s PGA Championship, a collaboration between KPMG, PGA of America and LPGA, combines a world-class, annual major golf championship with a women’s leadership summit and an ongoing charitable initiative. The events will take place June 7-12, 2016 at Sahalee Country Club in Sammamish, Washington. The Championship offers a $3.5 million purse, among the highest in women’s golf, and will be broadcast on NBC and Golf Channel.

An advisory council comprised of exemplary leaders from across business, sports, and the media is helping to guide the KPMG Women’s Leadership Summit.

Founding sponsors of the 2016 KPMG Women’s Leadership Summit are Microsoft, National Car Rental, and Zurich Insurance.

For more information about the KPMG Women’s Leadership Summit and KPMG Women’s PGA Championship, please visit: KPMG.com/WomensLeadership

PGA Tour/Twitter
Austin Johnson finds the correct ball Friday in the lake surrounding the fourth green at TPC Sawgrass.

It's not often that your brother will tell you to go jump in a lake, and you'll do it.

But that's exactly what happened to Austin Johnson on Friday during the second round of The Players Championship at TPC Sawgrass, and with good reason. It saved brother Dustin two penalty strokes.

In one of the odder situations that can crop up on a golf course, Dustin Johnson had marked his ball on the fourth green, near the edge where water comes into play. Somehow while trying to toss the ball to his brother, who caddies for him, the ball slipped out of Dustin's hand, went over the railroad ties and rolled into the lake.

According to Chip Essig, 2011 National PGA Golf Professional of the Year and Vice Chairman of the PGA of America's Rules Committee, a couple of Rules then came into play.

"Rule 16 states that if you lift the ball on the green, you've got to mark it and the ball's got to be replaced," Essig said. "And Rule 15 tells us we can't substitute a ball in that situation. There are instances where you can replace a ball. Unfortunately, picking it up off the green to clean it and putting it back is not one of them.

MORE RULES: Why taking relief may not be your best option

"You've got to put back the same ball you lifted. ... There used to be no way to get a ball back into play if you lost your original ball like that."

If that happened in the past, the player was disqualified, Essig said. Since the Rules were modified, it was changed to a two-stroke penalty for substituting a ball.

"Obviously, Dustin really didn't want the two-stroke penalty so he made his brother go down in the lake and find the ball," Essig said.

So as Dustin Johnson, fellow competitor Bubba Watson and a Rules official looked on, Austin climbed down into the water -- with sneakers on -- and lo and behold, found Dustin's ball on his first try.

The whole episode was caught on camera.

 

 

Disaster averted.

"A lot of times those lakes have enough slope in them that when the ball goes in, it rolls five or six feet further down," Essig said. "And there's a good chance there's a lot of balls in there. The fact that they pulled up a ball and it was his, is pretty lucky, too.

"The other thing that I'd be concerned about -- there's alligators in those lakes."

UNLUCKY BOUNCE: Rory McIlroy's penalty drop winds up wet

Why does Rule 15 exist in the first place? Essig explains.

"You've got to finish the hole with the ball you started with," he said. "They don't want a ball that you can hit off the tee that doesn't spin very much and goes farther, and then a ball you can hit off a fairway that spins a lot so you can stop it. And then you get to the green and get a ball that hasn't been hit at all that should be more round -- truer -- to putt with.

"They want you playing the game with one ball."

However, there are exceptions to the Rule. Essig said because of hazards, it's impractical to require golfers to find every lost ball. So a ball can be substituted in certain situations. If the ball goes in a water hazard, you can drop any ball with a one-stroke penalty. Same with the unplayable ball rule. You can also switch out a ball that's damaged in the course of play.

So the lesson to be learned?

"Never throw your ball to your caddie near water, because you don't want to lose it," Essig said. "It's one of those odd situations. How many times in a tournament does Dustin throw the ball to his brother and he never drops it? And the one time it drops, it's next to water and you've got to go get it."