Golf Buzz

Oliver Goss
Oliver Goss' ball teeters near the edge of the cup Saturday at the Par-3 18th hole.

Oliver Goss is a native of Australia, played collegiate golf at Tennessee, was runner-up at the 2013 U.S. Amateur and was the only amateur to make the cut at the 2014 Masters. The 20-year-old turned pro after the 2014 U.S. Open, missed the cut at the Travelers and was tied for the lead at the midway point of the Quicken Loans National at Congressional last weekend.

So he's pretty good. How good? Watch how close Goss comes to recording his first professional ace on the 18th hole Saturday at Greenbrier:

 

 

You would think gravity would have come to Goss' rescue. Or at least sheer momentum. Instead, the tap-in birdie makes up for the bogey he made the hole before and leaves Goss with an excellent way to finish up a 2-under 68 for the third round.

 

Steve Stricker
Steve Stricker drains a 41-foot boomerang for birdie Saturday at Greenbrier.

Steve Stricker hasn't decided whether he'll make the trip across the pond for the Open Championship in 10 days. But after dropping a 41-footer for a birdie on the first hole Saturday at Greenbrier, Strick just might have made up his mind.

Watch how much this putt breaks left to right. From this camera angle, the hole is actually just past Stricker's right elbow when he lines up:

Dead center in the heart of the cup for a birdie, and a high-five to boot. That's the way you'd like to start off a round.

Jack Nicklaus at Wimbledon
Getty Images
Jack Nicklaus and Rod Laver enjoy the gentlemen's singles semifinals Friday at Wimbledon.

What did you do for Independence Day? Play a little golf? Watch some fireworks? Go on a picnic? Fire up the grill? 

Jack Nicklaus didn't get a chance to do any of that, but his Fourth of July was definitely memorable. Nicklaus spent Friday afternoon in London, watching the gentlemen's singles tennis semifinals at Wimbledon from the royal box with tennis legend Rod "The Rocket" Laver.

Check it out:

 

 

Hot dogs and apple pie or strawberries and cream. Either way, having a conversation with two of the biggest stars of their respective sports in the 1960s would have been an amazing way to spend July 4th.

Bubba Watson's July 4th golf shoes
Bubba Watson via Twitter
Bubba Watson will wear a special Stars and Stripes-festooned pair of golf shoes on the 4th of July.

A lot of golfers wear special-edition products over the course of a season. One of the coolest things we've seen this year is the pair of shoes that Bubba Watson will wear Friday at the Greenbrier Classic.

These Fourth of July beauties are a Stars and Stripes version of the Oakley Carbon Pro 2 shoes that Watson has been wearing this year – he won the Masters in a pair three months ago.

The Carbon Pro 2 is the top of Oakley's golf shoe line. It features a waterproof full-grain leather upper with a compression-molded EVA chassis with Oakley's Red Code cushioning foam and an Ortholite foam insole. Inside are Oakley's Dynamic Motion Control and Coreflex Technology for comfort and flexibility.

MORE BUBBA: Check out Watson's brand-new pink Ping G30 driver

The shoes feature an antimicrobial treatment to fight odor, and have a full TPU plated outsole with PINS system cleat inserts. They carry a two-year limited waterproof warranty and carry a suggested retail price of $200.

This Stars and Stripes version looks like a special edition not for public sale, but the standard models come in black, white and an ivory treatment with gray and orange accents.

 

 

 

Tom Watson's 2015 Open Championship badge
Ryan Lauder via Twitter
Tom Watson's solid silver player's badge for the 2015 Open Championship has a claret jug for each of his five victories.

On Tuesday, the R&A gave Tom Watson an exemption into the 2015 Open Championship at St. Andrews. This will allow the five-time champion to finish up his Open career at St. Andrews – as Jack Nicklaus did in 2005 – and also will mark the 40th anniversary of his first Open title in 1975.

Today, we got a look at the solid silver player's badge that the R&A presented Watson to mark the occasion. You can see it below, thanks to Ryan Lauder ‏of TaylorMade (TaylorMade is the parent company of Adams Golf, Watson's equipment sponsor).

CAPTAIN'S BLOG: Watson talks about Open exemption, and latest on Ryder Cup team

As you might expect from the R&A, the badge is elegant in its simplicity. The five claret jugs represent Watson's five Open victories – Carnoustie in 1975, Turnberry in 1977, Muirfield in 1980, Troon in 1982 and Birkdale in 1983 – in a remarkable nine-year span.

Open champions are eligible to play until they're 60. Watson, 64, earned a five-year exemption for almost winning the 2009 Open at Turnberry, which most of us remember very well. That exemption runs out after this year's event at Royal Liverpool in two weeks.

 

 

July 3, 2014 - 9:32am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Bag Boy Tri Swivel II
Bag Boy
If you love to walk the golf course, but really don't like to carry your golf bag, the Bag Boy Tri Swivel II push cart is just what the doctor ordered.

A lot of people -- myself included -- prefer to walk the course during a round of golf.

Walking is just so much better than riding in a cart and for so many reasons, the least of which is the exercise.

First, chances are you're playing golf to get out of the office and relax. Walking allows you to take it all in. Walking also allows you to develop a rhythm throughout the round and, between shots, you have the chance to think about the upcoming shot.

RELATED: Check out PGA.com's extensive equipment page

The only thing I loathe about walking? Carrying my bag.

I remember growing up and playing alongside my dad and great, great uncle. We'd all take those old pull carts. They were great at the time, but as I got older, they became "uncool." For some reason, carrying a heavy bag was "cooler."

Now at 34 years old, I just don't feel like carrying anymore, but I still want to walk and I don't have a regular caddie to call on a whim every time I have a few free hours to tee it up. I've seen so many incredible looking push carts (much easier to navigate than the old pull carts) on the market, that I decided to try one for myself recently -- the Bag Boy Tri Swivel II.

Wow.

This is the next best thing to taking a caddie. We're in the middle of a typical steaming hot summer here in New England and it sure was nice to enjoy a round of golf in 90-degree temperatures without carrying around 20 extra pounds of luggage. Instead, I pushed the cart -- with incredible ease -- and was able to save my energy for what mattered most... the shot at hand.

The Bag Boy Tri Swivel II consists of the following features:

-- Lightweight, weather resistant aluminum frame

-- Handle mounted parking brake

-- Durable handlebar grip

-- Easy one-step handle adjustment accommodates golfers of all heights

-- NEW Full feature, extra deep scorecard holder offers golf ball storage

-- 9.5" front and 11.5" rear oversized wheels roll easily through the grass

-- Lightweight, solid foam, maintenance free tires

-- Integrated tee and ball holder

-- Integrated beverage holder

-- Oversized storage bag included

-- Weight: 17 lbs.

-- Folded dimension: 23.5" x 13" x 24"

My push cart was also equipped with an attachment for a small seat. That came in handy on a few occasions as we waited for the group in front of us.

I know many people are minimalists when it comes to what they take on to the course. I'm not one of those people. I like to be prepared for anything, so I always have a rain jacket, umbrella, extra golf balls, a couple of extra gloves, my rangefinder, etc.

All of that stuff -- along with a few snacks and bottles of water -- can really weigh down the golf bag. However, with the Bag Boy Tri Swivel II, you're not weighed down by your extra cargo at all. It was fantastic.

The features that really made this push cart so special were the beverage holder, tee and ball holder and scorecard holder. You don't realize how nice it is to have all this things util you actually have them. The only items I keep in my pocket now with this cart are a ball marker and a divot tool. Other than that, I simply grab a tee or ball off the top console as I need it.

There's also a convenient little net that drops down from the top console which is great for a rangefinder or GPS device. And a small pocket on the back side of the top console was perfect to store a cell phone, car keys and wallet.

You might get a few funny looks from those on the practice green when you stroll up with this sophisticated push cart, but they'll be jealous in no time. It makes the round and the walk far more enjoyable and far less exhausting.

The Tri Swivel II sells for $249.95. You know that saying, "you get what you pay for?"

Well, that's the case with this push cart. It's not cheap, but it's high end and you're not likely to ever need another push cart.

If you don't want to spend that much, Bag Boy's C3 push cart is another worthy option. It has many, but not all, of the same features as the Tri Swivel II. The C3 retails for $199.95.

For more information, visit www.bagboycompany.com