Golf Buzz

July 8, 2013 - 1:50pm
Posted by:
John Holmes
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TaylorMade Justin Rose Ghost spider Blade putter
Courtesy of TaylorMade
The limited-edition replicas of Justin Rose's Ghost Spider Blade putter include Rose's personal logo on the bottom and a red and yellow grip up top.

To commemorate Justin Rose's victory at the U.S. Open last month, TaylorMade is selling 99 exact replicas of his Ghost Spider Blade putter. 

Each of these limited-edition models is built to Rose's specs – they're 37 5/8 inches long, equipped with a black Ghost Tour shaft and a red Tour Only Counterbalanced grip with a yellow top. Every head is numbered and stamped with Rose's personal ''JR'' logo.

There are only 99 of them, TaylorMade says, because 99 is the number on Rose's Lethal golf ball. That number is on his ball, Rose says, because 9 is his wife's favorite number, so he doubled it to make 99 for extra-good luck.

You can order your putter from TaylorMade now. They cost $299.99, and are expected to be available on July 16.

TaylorMade calls the Ghost Spider Blade, which became available at retail last month, the most stable blade-style putter it's ever made. That's partly due to its construction, in which the vast majority of the head weight is positioned in the heel and toe.

In addition, the Spider Blade's head is counterbalanced with a 130-gram grip that's twice as heavy as a typical putter grip. Counterbalancing increases the stability of the club, making it easier to keep the head moving on your intended swing path.

The Spider Blade is available in two lengths, 35 inches and 38 inches. To properly use the Spider Blade, TaylorMade says, you should grip the club with two or three inches of the butt-end of the grip extended above your hands to provide the maximum benefit of counterbalancing. Therefore, the company explains, if you normally use a 35-inch putter, you should use a 38-inch Spider Blade; if you normally go with a 33-inch putter, you should use a 35-inch Spider Blade.

The Spider Blade also features a PureRoll Surlyn insert for a soft feel and smooth roll, and has a white leading edge and linear alignment aid in the cavity to make aiming easy. It carries a suggested retail price of $199.99.

 

July 6, 2013 - 8:34pm
Posted by:
John Holmes
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Dwight Howard and his golf bag
Charlie Kautz via Twitter (l), adidas Golf (r)
Dwight Howard hits the course with a set of TaylorMade clubs that are two inches longer than most everyone else's.

I'm not the biggest NBA fan, but I am a proud Texan, so I was glad to see the Houston Rockets make a splash by landing Dwight Howard. People seem to either love this guy or hate him, but I kinda like him because he's a golfer.

In fact, Howard owns one of the more unusual sets of clubs around – they're big!

''Say what you want about @DwightHoward. Anybody who uses midsize grips +5 wraps of tape is a legend in my book,'' Charlie Kautz of TaylorMade commented earlier today as he tweeted out the photo on the left, showing Howard getting ready to take a big cut. 

On the right is a closer look at his golf bag that adidas Golf posted on its Facebook page last November. Along with the photo is a list of Howard's clubs:

TaylorMade R11S 9-degree driver (Aldila RIP Phenom 65 Stiff flex)
TaylorMade RBZ 3-wood (Matrix X-Con 5 Stiff)
TaylorMade RBZ 5-wood (Matrix X-Con 5 Stiff)
TaylorMade RBZ 4 Rescue (RBZ 65 Stiff)
TaylorMade RBZ irons 4-PW (RBZ Steel Stiff)
TaylorMade ATV wedges 56* and 60* (KBS Wedge Flex)
TaylorMade Ghost Manta putter (38")
Ball: Penta TP5 #12
Grips: Lamkin Crossline +5 wraps

And, it noted, all of Howard's clubs are two inches longer than normal.

I'm not sure if golf played any role in Howard's decision to go to Houston, but there are plenty of great courses there, from Redstone and the Woodlands to River Oaks and Champions. So welcome to Texas, Dwight. Hopefully you’ll have time to squeeze in a few rounds while you lead the Rockets back to the promised land.

 

 

 
July 5, 2013 - 5:40pm
Posted by:
John Holmes
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Titleist Scotty Cameron Futura X mallet
Courtesy of Titleist
The Futura X mallet from Scotty Cameron combines a rear balance bar with deep heel-toe weights plus perimeter weighting under the face for balance and stability throughout the stroke.

The Futura X mallet from Scotty Cameron is new, but if you think it looks a familiar, you're right. It's the putter Adam Scott used to win the Masters.

Scott called his Futura X prototype ''the most stable putter I have ever played,'' and that's exactly what Cameron was shooting for as he and Scott worked together to refine the design. 

Precision milled from high-grade 6061 aluminum, the Futura X combines a rear balance bar with deep heel-toe weights plus perimeter weighting under the face. The resulting deep Center of Gravity provides stability throughout the stroke, Cameron says, while the perimeter weighting adds forgiveness and feel.

The Futura X contains four stainless heel-toe weights, two 20-gram weights on the rear balance bar and two adjustable sole weights (configured depending on the length) in the front corners of the putter under the face. The total headweight is 20 grams heavier than a standard Cameron Select putter, but because much of the weight is located behind the axis of the shaft and not directly under the golfer's hands, says Cameron, the putter feels stable but not heavy during the stroke.

''Futura X is what I call a 'force balanced' design,'' Cameron said. ''While the putter has a near-face balanced shaft configuration that would normally produce a slight toe hang, there's so much weight off the back of the putter that it forces the face to hang flat. The rear balance bar allows us to add considerable weight a fairly long distance away from the shaft axis, which is really what drives the high MOI [Moment of Inertia, essentially a measurement of stability].''

The Futura X will come in standard lengths of 33, 34 and 35 inches -- as opposed to Scott's long model. A double-bend, stepless steel shaft with one shaft of offset provides a square, technical visual at address. 

The putter has a Frozen Titanium finish that helps reduce glare, two black sightlines and red cherry-dot weights in the sole and balance bar. It carries a suggested detail price of $375, will be available at retail on Aug. 1.

 

July 4, 2013 - 7:38pm
Posted by:
John Holmes
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True Temper golf shaft drawing
Project X Golf via Tiwtter
The Project X division of True Temper took to Twitter last week to show us this drawing of a True Temper shaft from 1941 -- about the time Byron Nelson began playing True Temper shafts.

To celebrate the Fourth of July, I thought I'd pass along a little bit of golf Americana that I ran across recently.

On June 27, the Project X division of shaftmaker True Temper tweeted out the photo posted above. It's a schematic of a steel shaft from 1941 – ''here's what we looked like without computers,'' the tweet said.

My favorite part, though, is at the top of the drawing – at the time, True Temper was a division of the American Fork & Hoe Co., whose roots can be traced back to the early days of the United States.

True Temper was formed in 1800 when several small companies that specialized in forging got together. In 1902, True Temper and several other toolmakers merged to create American Fork & Hoe in Cleveland. By the 1930s, it had become the largest hand-tool company in America, supplying about 90 percent of the hand tools used on American farms. 

Along with rakes and pitchforks, the AF&H plant in Geneva, Ohio, began making fishing rods, ski poles and golf shafts. As early as 1931, True Temper was displaying its steel shafts at tournaments and other events as golfers began switching from hickory shafts to steel.

True Temper got a big boost in 1940, when an up-and coming professional named Byron Nelson began using its shafts, and AF&H changed its name to True Temper in 1949. In 1967, True Temper created the first mechanical club-swinging robot for testing – its name, of course, was Iron Byron. And in 2010, True Temper's plant in Amory, Miss., built its billionth shaft as the company remains the all-time leader among shaftmakers in wins around the globe.

True Temper isn't the only American golf company that's been around so long – Wilson Sporting Goods has created in the 1920s, for example, and Titleist was founded in 1932. But it certainly played a unique and crucial role in the growth and development of both American agriculture and American golf. 

 

 

 

July 4, 2013 - 5:03pm
Posted by:
John Kim
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John Daly
Getty Images
John Daly may not have had the best score - but he probably had the best pants.

The fourth of July is about freedom, family, fun and - awesome pants?

John Daly had a rough go in the opening round of the Greenbrier Classic, putting up a 5-over 75. However, he will still make headlines and many sportscasts because he will win the "most appropriately dressed" for this 4th of July.

His choice in pants are from one of his sponsors - our friends at Loudmouth Golf, and the pattern is called "Old Glory."

And regardless of Daly's score at the end of the week, his pants are going to be a perfect 10 on the 4th. 

You can follow John Kim on Twitter at @johnkim_10

July 3, 2013 - 3:31pm
Posted by:
John Holmes
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Nike Golf FI Impact golf shoes
Courtesy of Nike Golf
The women's Nike FI Impact golf shoe (l) was created with input from Suzann Pettersen, while the men's version (r) utilizes the Nike Dynamic Fit system for extra support.

Nike Golf's TW '13 golf shoes, which were inspired by Nike's Free athletic shoes, proved so popular that the company has expanded its offerings of lightweight, flexible Free-inspired golf shoes. And along with a new men's model is the first edition designed for women, created with input from LPGA Tour star Suzann Pettersen.

Pettersen had always preferred traditionally spiked shoes, Nike said, but on a visit to the Nike Sport Research Lab last summer, she quickly realized she could harness her power without the removable spikes. So Nike set to work to create a shoe for her that incorporated technology from the TW '13 footwear.

''We collaborated closely with Pettersen to create a shoe fit for her game,'' said Nike Golf Footwear Product Director Lee Walker. ''The FI Impact allows her to get the transfer of energy she demands, proving even a swing as powerful as Pettersen's can utilize the performance of Integrated Traction.''

''After I tried them once, I was dying to get them on my feet in competition,'' said Pettersen. ''I can really feel the ground and the increase in power through my swing.''

And in fact, she won the LPGA Lotte Championship in Hawaii in April, her first tournament wearing the new shoes.

The outsole of the FI Impact is designed to mimic and conform to the foot's natural motion while delivering protection and traction. This allows the golfer to maintain contact with the ground longer, Nike says, to better harness the energy of the foot to the shoe and the shoe to the ground. 

The men's version also utilizes the Nike Dynamic Fit system to provide extra support. A Free-inspired platform and waterproof mesh upper offer increased flexibility with breathability to keep feet cool, dry and comfortable. 

The men's FI Impact shoes will be available at retail on Aug. 1 in Black/Metallic Silver; Light Base Grey/Black; Military Blue/White; and MD Base Grey/Team Orange, with Black/Venom Green coming out next year. They carry a suggested retail price of $160 per pair.

The women's edition also will come out Aug. 1 for the same suggested retail price of $160 per pair. They’ll be available in White/Vivid Pink; White/Turf Orange; and Black/Polarized Blue.