Golf Buzz

mark wahlberg backyard golf
Instagram
 
 
If you weren't jealous of Mark Wahlberg before, you will be now. The Oscar-nominated actor has never been shy in expressing that his heart never strays far from the golf course.
 
Or in this case, in his back yard. Wahlberg took to his Instagram Thursday to show off his newly-installed backyard practice area, which includes a large green, several large bunkers, and a chipping mat from his balcony.
 
While everybody has played a little golf in their backyard at some point in their life, it probably didn't look a whole lot like this.
 
Wahlberg showed off his golf skills at this year's Pebble Beach Pro-Am, playing with Bubba Watson, and the lefty has said he holds a nine handicap.
 
With a little help from his buddies at Back Nine Greens, and probably a large bag of cash, that handicap could be headed down. How much do you think a setup like this costs?
 
Maybe Wahlberg should look into this $16 million golfer's dream home.
 
Douglas Elliman Real Estate

If you had all the money in the world and were tasked with building a golfer's dream house, what would it look like?

Chances are it would resemble this mansion in Westchester, New York. And you're in luck, it's for sale! The price tag: just under $16 million.

The nearly 10,000 square foot house sits on 10 acres and looks out onto conversed land around Lake Waccabuc, only an hour's drive from New York City.

It includes six bedrooms, eight baths, an infitinity pool, a heated spa, a 100 foot-long dock, a boat house, a one-bedroom guesthouse, and 300 feet of direct waterfront along which 60 feet of beach has been installed.

And the best part for golfers? How about two golf greens, a driving range, and 10 tee boxes for 10 different golf shots.

The original house was built in 1928 by Enoch Mead, who owned Lake Waccabuc and the surrounding area. Its current owner, Mark Mosello, bought the property in 1990 for $1 million. Mosello works as an outdoor lighting designer and his work can be seen on the estates of financiers like Sanford Weill and Jamie Dimon.

If you're interested and have an extra $16 million laying around, check out the listing here.

 

June 9, 2016 - 12:10pm
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
child
Instagram
No matter what your age, pulling off a great shot on the golf course is always cause for celebration.

The headline pretty much says it all.

How cool is this shot and reaction from a little guy looking like Ernie Els out of the bunker?

June 8, 2016 - 11:17am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Ian Poulter
USA Today Sports Images
Ian Poulter opened up about his foot injury and how disappointed he is to not be competing in this year's Ryder Cup in an interview with Matt Adams on Wednesday.

European Ryder Cup stalwart Ian Poulter will not be in this year's Ryder Cup at Hazeltine National -- at least not as a player.

Poulter was appointed as a vice captain early this week by Captain Darren Clarke after disclosing that he would be away from the game for several months to recover from a foot injury.

On Wednesday morning, Poulter joined Matt Adams on Golf Channel's Fairways of Life show and talked about how much it hurt -- emotionally -- to be dealing with an injury in a Ryder Cup year.

RELATED: Ian Poulter's best Ryder Cup moments | Poulter named assistant captain

"It's demoralizing because it's no secret how much I love the Ryder Cup and how much I want to compete," Poulter, who sports a 12-4-2 record in five Ryder Cup appearances, told Adams. "Obviously, I wasn't in the best of form. I was finding it difficult to play and wasn't in a position to get picked either. I would have put extra pressure on myself and played more tournaments to try and make the team and it would have sent me down a bad path."

Once Poulter explained the situation to Clarke, he was immediately offered a role in Clarke's back room as an assistant captain.

"I was honored for him to ask me," Poulter said. 'It's an amazing position to be in to be able to spend that time with the team. It's going to mean an awful lot and hopefully, if I can help in anyway possible -- whether it's making a cup of tea or doing anything I need to do to help that team feel comfortable, be happy on the golf course, be happy off the golf course, then I'm going to do whatever it is I need to do to assist that team."

Since winning the 1995 Ryder Cup at Oak Hill in Rochester, N.Y., the Europeans have only lost the Ryder Cup twice -- 1999 and 2008.

You can watch the complete Poulter interview here:
 

June 8, 2016 - 8:21am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Oakmont
PGA of America Archive
Won Jun Lee, a 17-year-old from South Korea, missed out on a spot in next week's U.S. Open at Oakmont after a rules violation in his sectional qualifier.

On Tuesday, we told you the story of amateur golfer Chris Crawford, who realized a dream when he holed a 40-foot birdie putt on his final hole of a 36-hole sectional qualifier to secure a spot in next week's U.S. Open at Oakmont.

Today, we bring you the nightmarish story of Won Jun Lee, a 17-year-old from South Korea, who missed out on a spot at Oakmont in the most crushing way imaginable -- not understanding one of the many tedious rules of golf.

Garry Smits from Jacksonville.com reports:

Lee, seventh in the World Junior Rankings, received a two-stroke penalty on the 11th hole during the second round after using a club to tamp down a pitch mark that his ball had left when landing behind the green.

According to golf rule 13-2, players are not allowed to repair such marks off the green when they might interfere with their swing.

Playing partner Tim Wilkinson called for an official at that point because he said Lee had already skirted the rule several times in the first round and another time at the second hole in the second round.

Instead of a par, the two-stroke penalty gave Lee a double-bogey six and a score of 68 instead of 66. At 5-under 139 for two rounds, Lee finished one-shot out of a five-for-two spots playoff to get into the U.S. Open.

More from Smits:

Without the penalty, Lee would have tied Wilkinson for second at 7-under and the five players who finished 6-under would have gone to a playoff for one spot instead of two.

“I had to say something ... it’s unfortunate because he’s a very, very good player,” said Wilkinson, a PGA Tour member. “I wanted him to realize that you’ve got to respect the game. And it’s about the rest of the field, too.”

Wilkinson said Lee initially denied tapping down the pitch mark.

“I said, ‘you can’t do that ... you can’t tap down pitch marks behind the ball,’” Wilkinson said. “He said, ‘no I didn’t,’ and I said, ‘yes you did ... I just watched you do it.’ Sorry, that was an admission of guilt to me.”

Yikes. Smits also reported that Lee left the course in tears and was unavailable for comment.