.

Weed eaters: Illinois course rents goats

HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill. -- Goats may not be welcome at Wrigley Field this week, but they're appreciated in Hoffman Estates, where they're chomping on a bit of buckthorn at Bridges of Poplar Creek Country Club.

Forty goats from The Green Goats rental company in Monroe, Wis., arrived on Thursday to graze on weeds that have invaded some areas of the course.

Dustin Hugen, the club's golf course superintendent, took a cue from a counterpart in St. Charles when he sought a green, sustainable and cost-effective way to deal with unwanted plants at Hoffman Estates Park District course.

"We were looking for environmentally friendly ways to clear brush without burning, using chemicals or using equipment that has gas and requires labor," he said.

Luckily for him, he said, the goats' favorite food is buckthorn, which he said has begun to crowd out more desirable plants in the course's 30 acres of natural areas. Other invaders include Canadian thistle and Queen Anne's Lace, and though the goats aren't as drawn to those plants, they'll eat them as long as the natural areas are kept green, he said.

Hugen and his crew have set aside about five acres that he hopes the goats will clear in the next two weeks. A goat can munch about 300 square feet of grass in a day, meaning it could be a two- to three-year process to clear out all of the invasive plants on the course.

The animals were set up Thursday inside of a 12-volt electric fence, with jugs of water and salt stick treats, on 1.2 acres along the first hole and the driving range. Once the goats chomp up the grasses there, they'll be moved to the sixth hole behind the parking lot to indulge in another 3.5 acres.

For the last few years, the park district has been mowing to control the invasive plant species, averaging six dumpsters of waste every fall at a cost of $500 a dumpster. Using the goats is about half the price, at $3 per goat per day. The new course maintenance "staff," however, will be supervised around the clock by Hugen and his crew.

He's still not sure yet how they'll handle the waste, hoping it can be spread as fertilizer.

The course will remain open throughout the process, said Brian Bechtold, director of golf operations, adding he's planning some special "goat golf" rates for players. "Customers will see them from the first hole ... but (the goats are) out of harm's way. It's a really bad golf shot if you hit one of them."

Bechtold and Hugen are expecting visitors but hope they'll stop in the pro shop before they head over to check out the goats. As for Hugen, a die-hard Cubs fan and Wrigleyville resident, he's not worried about his new maintenance staff.

"I am not superstitious," Hugen said.

This article was written by Elizabeth Owens-Schiele from Chicago Tribune and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

By
Elizabeth Owens-Schiele

Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Friday, August 28, 2015 | 7:07 a.m.

HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill. -- Goats may not be welcome at Wrigley Field this week, but they're appreciated in Hoffman Estates, where they're chomping on a bit of buckthorn at Bridges of Poplar Creek Country Club.

Forty goats from The Green Goats rental company in Monroe, Wis., arrived on Thursday to graze on weeds that have invaded some areas of the course.

Dustin Hugen, the club's golf course superintendent, took a cue from a counterpart in St. Charles when he sought a green, sustainable and cost-effective way to deal with unwanted plants at Hoffman Estates Park District course.

"We were looking for environmentally friendly ways to clear brush without burning, using chemicals or using equipment that has gas and requires labor," he said.

Luckily for him, he said, the goats' favorite food is buckthorn, which he said has begun to crowd out more desirable plants in the course's 30 acres of natural areas. Other invaders include Canadian thistle and Queen Anne's Lace, and though the goats aren't as drawn to those plants, they'll eat them as long as the natural areas are kept green, he said.

Hugen and his crew have set aside about five acres that he hopes the goats will clear in the next two weeks. A goat can munch about 300 square feet of grass in a day, meaning it could be a two- to three-year process to clear out all of the invasive plants on the course.

The animals were set up Thursday inside of a 12-volt electric fence, with jugs of water and salt stick treats, on 1.2 acres along the first hole and the driving range. Once the goats chomp up the grasses there, they'll be moved to the sixth hole behind the parking lot to indulge in another 3.5 acres.

For the last few years, the park district has been mowing to control the invasive plant species, averaging six dumpsters of waste every fall at a cost of $500 a dumpster. Using the goats is about half the price, at $3 per goat per day. The new course maintenance "staff," however, will be supervised around the clock by Hugen and his crew.

He's still not sure yet how they'll handle the waste, hoping it can be spread as fertilizer.

The course will remain open throughout the process, said Brian Bechtold, director of golf operations, adding he's planning some special "goat golf" rates for players. "Customers will see them from the first hole ... but (the goats are) out of harm's way. It's a really bad golf shot if you hit one of them."

Bechtold and Hugen are expecting visitors but hope they'll stop in the pro shop before they head over to check out the goats. As for Hugen, a die-hard Cubs fan and Wrigleyville resident, he's not worried about his new maintenance staff.

"I am not superstitious," Hugen said.

This article was written by Elizabeth Owens-Schiele from Chicago Tribune and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Ohio golfer, 68, aces par-4

PORTSMOUTH, Ohio -- Local golfer Cornel Chapman has hit thousands of shots over the span of nearly fifty years, but one shot last Sunday topped them all.

Playing in a foursome with Mike Copley, Mike Swearinger and Jeff Keaton at the Elks Country Club, Chapman teed off on the par-four ninth hole, sending the ball down a steep slope and over a large tree planted in the fairway. Chapman figured that his drive had reached the green (he says he has done so on the ninth hole before), but had no idea where his ball ended up.

As his group approached the green, they were stunned to see the group ahead of them waving their arms and pointing to the hole.

"It was the biggest shock I've ever had," Chapman said.

Chapman -- a "five or six" handicap golfer -- had not only hit his first-ever hole-in-one, but accomplished one of the rarest feats in golf: a double-eagle, or three-under-par on a single hole.

Chapman said that employees of the Elks often see hole-in-ones, but could only recall two other instances in recent years were a golfer holed out on the ninth hole.

"I can probably hit a thousand more of those shots, and I couldn't do it," he said.

Though he was able to check off an item on his "Bucket List," the 68-year-old golfer isn't planning on stepping away from the game any time soon.

"It's stuff like this that keeps me coming back," Chapman said.

This article was written by Alex Hider from The Portsmouth Daily Times, Ohio and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

By
Alex Hider

Series: Other Tour

Published: Thursday, August 27, 2015 | 7:46 p.m.

PORTSMOUTH, Ohio -- Local golfer Cornel Chapman has hit thousands of shots over the span of nearly fifty years, but one shot last Sunday topped them all.

Playing in a foursome with Mike Copley, Mike Swearinger and Jeff Keaton at the Elks Country Club, Chapman teed off on the par-four ninth hole, sending the ball down a steep slope and over a large tree planted in the fairway. Chapman figured that his drive had reached the green (he says he has done so on the ninth hole before), but had no idea where his ball ended up.

As his group approached the green, they were stunned to see the group ahead of them waving their arms and pointing to the hole.

"It was the biggest shock I've ever had," Chapman said.

Chapman -- a "five or six" handicap golfer -- had not only hit his first-ever hole-in-one, but accomplished one of the rarest feats in golf: a double-eagle, or three-under-par on a single hole.

Chapman said that employees of the Elks often see hole-in-ones, but could only recall two other instances in recent years were a golfer holed out on the ninth hole.

"I can probably hit a thousand more of those shots, and I couldn't do it," he said.

Though he was able to check off an item on his "Bucket List," the 68-year-old golfer isn't planning on stepping away from the game any time soon.

"It's stuff like this that keeps me coming back," Chapman said.

This article was written by Alex Hider from The Portsmouth Daily Times, Ohio and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Bernhard Langer ready to defend his Dick's Sporting Goods Open title

Bernhard Langer
USA Today Sports Images
Bernhard Langer of Germany waits to tee off on the 16th hole during the final round of the Champions Tour Dick's Sporting Goods Open at En-Joie Golf Course on Aug. 17, 2014 in Endicott, N.Y.

ENDICOTT, N.Y. (AP) — Since it became a stop on the Champions Tour eight years ago, the Dick's Sporting Goods Open has not had a repeat champion. Bernhard Langer is ready to change that, even without daughter Christina helping call the shots.

"It's possible. Anything is possible," Langer said as he prepared to begin defense of his title on Friday, a day after his 58th birthday. "But it's not that easy of a golf course. You've got to drive it extremely straight and hit some great shots to stay out of trouble."

TEE TIMES: Dick's Sporting Goods Open

Langer rallied to the victory last August at En-Joie Golf Club, playing all 54 holes without a bogey and closing with a 6-under 66 for a one-stroke victory over Woody Austin and Mark O'Meara. Langer finished at 16-under 200.

"It was a phenomenal week," said Langer, third in the Charles Schwab Cup standings. "It was even more special because my daughter was on the bag — her first win with me on the professional circuit and grabbing the flag a little bit prematurely on 18. That was all my fault. I had a little senior moment, told her she could do it, forgot there was another group behind me that was still playing."

Langer's daughter had two back surgeries in February and isn't strong enough yet to be on the bag again. She'll be replaced by her brother Stefan.

Langer's 23rd career victory last August on the 50-and-over tour came a day after Kevin Sutherland stunned the field with a 59, becoming the first player in Champions Tour history to break 60. It could have been even better, if not for a three-putt bogey from about 40 feet just off the 18th green.

"That was a pretty unusual round," said Langer, who is coming off a runner-up finish on Sunday in the Boeing Classic at TPC Snoqualmie Ridge. "To beat the course record by four shots, that's a pretty amazing feat. The players are getting better, stronger and hit the ball further."

The 59 gave Sutherland a one-shot lead over Steve Lowery heading to the final round, but he had a closing 74 to fade to a tie for seventh at 12 under.

Langer, who won the Senior Players Championship in June and finished just one shot behind Billy Andrade at the Boeing Classic last weekend, continues to excel as he inches closer to age 60. His Dick's Sporting Goods Open victory last year was his third triumph in five starts, and this year he leads the Champions Tour in scoring (68.91).

"I'd like to be a little better," Langer said. "I missed a couple of tournaments early in the season, then played a couple of events where I didn't play quite as well as I wanted to.

"It's been a decent year, just not quite as good as the last couple."

By
John Kekis

Series: Champions Tour

Published: Thursday, August 27, 2015 | 5:10 p.m.

ENDICOTT, N.Y. (AP) — Since it became a stop on the Champions Tour eight years ago, the Dick's Sporting Goods Open has not had a repeat champion. Bernhard Langer is ready to change that, even without daughter Christina helping call the shots.

"It's possible. Anything is possible," Langer said as he prepared to begin defense of his title on Friday, a day after his 58th birthday. "But it's not that easy of a golf course. You've got to drive it extremely straight and hit some great shots to stay out of trouble."

TEE TIMES: Dick's Sporting Goods Open

Langer rallied to the victory last August at En-Joie Golf Club, playing all 54 holes without a bogey and closing with a 6-under 66 for a one-stroke victory over Woody Austin and Mark O'Meara. Langer finished at 16-under 200.

"It was a phenomenal week," said Langer, third in the Charles Schwab Cup standings. "It was even more special because my daughter was on the bag — her first win with me on the professional circuit and grabbing the flag a little bit prematurely on 18. That was all my fault. I had a little senior moment, told her she could do it, forgot there was another group behind me that was still playing."

Langer's daughter had two back surgeries in February and isn't strong enough yet to be on the bag again. She'll be replaced by her brother Stefan.

Langer's 23rd career victory last August on the 50-and-over tour came a day after Kevin Sutherland stunned the field with a 59, becoming the first player in Champions Tour history to break 60. It could have been even better, if not for a three-putt bogey from about 40 feet just off the 18th green.

"That was a pretty unusual round," said Langer, who is coming off a runner-up finish on Sunday in the Boeing Classic at TPC Snoqualmie Ridge. "To beat the course record by four shots, that's a pretty amazing feat. The players are getting better, stronger and hit the ball further."

The 59 gave Sutherland a one-shot lead over Steve Lowery heading to the final round, but he had a closing 74 to fade to a tie for seventh at 12 under.

Langer, who won the Senior Players Championship in June and finished just one shot behind Billy Andrade at the Boeing Classic last weekend, continues to excel as he inches closer to age 60. His Dick's Sporting Goods Open victory last year was his third triumph in five starts, and this year he leads the Champions Tour in scoring (68.91).

"I'd like to be a little better," Langer said. "I missed a couple of tournaments early in the season, then played a couple of events where I didn't play quite as well as I wanted to.

"It's been a decent year, just not quite as good as the last couple."


Georgia teen fires course-record 56

BECKLEY, W.Va. -- Colin Bowles may be living in Georgia now, but he isn't done tearing through courses back in the Mountain State.

The 16-year-old, who recently moved from Wyoming County to Albany, Ga., broke his own record Wednesday at Clearfork Valley Golf Course, his home course, formerly run by his dad, Toney, and now run by his older brother, Corey.

Bowles carded 12 birdies and an eagle on No. 5 for the round of 56, breaking his former best of 58. He had a 12-foot putt for 55 on No. 18 but couldn't get it to fall.

"I putted great," he said of his overall round. "Obviously you can't shoot a score like that without putting well."

Bowles made the turn at 27 from the blue tees, the tips at Clearfork Valley, and admitted feeling some nerves coming down the stretch.

Sitting at 12-under heading to the par-5 16th, he chipped it close for birdie and then drove the green on the par-4 17th. He two-putted for birdie there, his 12th of the day.

The former Westside star said he's adjusting to the heat in Georgia and to the new course his father owns and operates, River Pointe Golf Club.

"It's a tough course," said Bowles. "The back 9 is really tight. It's improved my accuracy, because it's the 9 I play all the time if I'm by myself. Even-par on the back 9 is a great score."

Bowles said his best score at River Pointe is a 69.

This article was written by Cam Huffman from The Register-Herald, Beckley, W.Va. and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

By
Cam Huffman

Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Thursday, August 27, 2015 | 4:34 p.m.

BECKLEY, W.Va. -- Colin Bowles may be living in Georgia now, but he isn't done tearing through courses back in the Mountain State.

The 16-year-old, who recently moved from Wyoming County to Albany, Ga., broke his own record Wednesday at Clearfork Valley Golf Course, his home course, formerly run by his dad, Toney, and now run by his older brother, Corey.

Bowles carded 12 birdies and an eagle on No. 5 for the round of 56, breaking his former best of 58. He had a 12-foot putt for 55 on No. 18 but couldn't get it to fall.

"I putted great," he said of his overall round. "Obviously you can't shoot a score like that without putting well."

Bowles made the turn at 27 from the blue tees, the tips at Clearfork Valley, and admitted feeling some nerves coming down the stretch.

Sitting at 12-under heading to the par-5 16th, he chipped it close for birdie and then drove the green on the par-4 17th. He two-putted for birdie there, his 12th of the day.

The former Westside star said he's adjusting to the heat in Georgia and to the new course his father owns and operates, River Pointe Golf Club.

"It's a tough course," said Bowles. "The back 9 is really tight. It's improved my accuracy, because it's the 9 I play all the time if I'm by myself. Even-par on the back 9 is a great score."

Bowles said his best score at River Pointe is a 69.

This article was written by Cam Huffman from The Register-Herald, Beckley, W.Va. and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Eduardo de la Riva and Renato Paratore share Czech Masters lead

 

VYSOKY UJEZD, Czech Republic -- Both Eduardo De la Riva and Renato Paratore shot a 7-under 65 to take a shared lead after the first round at the D+D REal Czech Masters Thursday.

The 33-year-old Spaniard De La Riva recovered from an early bogey on the second with six birdies. He finished his round by holing for an eagle on the par-4 18th from the fairway with one of the shots of the day to join Paratore at the top of the leaderboard.

"Today, I played very solid," De La Riva said. "It's very good to finish with 2 in a par 4. This 18th is a very difficult hole. So, I'm very happy."

The 18-year-old Italian Paratore produced a flawless round with seven birdies.

"Today, I played really solid from the tee to the green and on the back nine I putted really well," he said. "So I'm happy with a 65. It is my best round on The European Tour."

Both leaders are seeking the first European Tour victory at the Albatross Golf Course near Prague.

A group of four, Englishmen Matt Fitzpatrick and Sam Hutsby, Pelle Edberg of Sweden and Thomas Pieters of Belgium were one stroke back after carding 66.

Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Series: European Tour

Published: Thursday, August 27, 2015 | 3:51 p.m.

 

VYSOKY UJEZD, Czech Republic -- Both Eduardo De la Riva and Renato Paratore shot a 7-under 65 to take a shared lead after the first round at the D+D REal Czech Masters Thursday.

The 33-year-old Spaniard De La Riva recovered from an early bogey on the second with six birdies. He finished his round by holing for an eagle on the par-4 18th from the fairway with one of the shots of the day to join Paratore at the top of the leaderboard.

"Today, I played very solid," De La Riva said. "It's very good to finish with 2 in a par 4. This 18th is a very difficult hole. So, I'm very happy."

The 18-year-old Italian Paratore produced a flawless round with seven birdies.

"Today, I played really solid from the tee to the green and on the back nine I putted really well," he said. "So I'm happy with a 65. It is my best round on The European Tour."

Both leaders are seeking the first European Tour victory at the Albatross Golf Course near Prague.

A group of four, Englishmen Matt Fitzpatrick and Sam Hutsby, Pelle Edberg of Sweden and Thomas Pieters of Belgium were one stroke back after carding 66.

Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


The race for $10 million gets underway at Plainfield

USA Today Sports Images
Hunter Mahan won The Barclays in 2014 by a 2-shot margin.

EDISON, N.J. — The points are slightly different for the FedExCup playoffs. The principle remains unchanged.

For those who narrowly got into the top 125 to qualify for golf's ultimate bonus series, it's time to play well or go home. That applies to players such as Lee Westwood and Jason Dufner, Stewart Cink and Luke Donald, and possibly Adam Scott.

LEADERBOARD: The Barclays

Those with mediocre seasons on the PGA Tour — Phil Mickelson and Henrik Stenson are two who come to mind — they get at least two tournaments, maybe three, to play better golf and wind up at East Lake for the Tour Championship.

Jordan Spieth?

That's a tricky one. The No. 1 player in the world, and No. 1 in the FedExCup, all that really matters is winning the Tour Championship to capture the $10 million prize. Spieth could win three straight playoff events and finish runner-up at East Lake and finish second.

"After the major season is over, which is where we wanted to peak, we've sat back over the last week and said, 'How can we get that same kind of momentum to where we can try and peak for the Tour Championship?'" Spieth said.

The playoffs begin Thursday at The Barclays with a 120-man field because five players chose not to play for various reasons. For all the points that will be tossed around on television, the only math function that really matters is subtraction.

THROWBACK: The 2014 FedEx Cup playoffs in photos

Only 100 players advance to the Deutsche Bank Championship. From there, only 70 players move on to the BMW Championship. And that gets whittled down to the top 30 players who reach the Tour Championship.

Here's what to look for when The Barclays begins at Plainfield Country Club:

LONELY AT THE TOP: The No. 1 seed at the start of the playoffs has gone on to claim the $10 million prize just two times since the FedExCup began in 2007. This might not come as surprise, but both times involved Tiger Woods.

Woods has been No. 1 in the standings a record five times, including in 2008 when he stopped playing in June because of knee surgery.

That's because the points are reset going into the Tour Championship to give all 30 players a mathematical chance at winning the FedEx Cup. For all the top seeds, it's a matter of having your best week at East Lake. It's not that simple.

Here's where the eight FedExCup champions were seeded going into the playoffs: 1-7-1-3-15-19-9-69.

TOUR'S WORST NIGHTMARE: Because the points are quadrupled in value for the playoffs, there is a mathematical possibility that a player can win the FedExCup without ever having won a tournament all season. It hasn't happened — yet. But it's not that far-fetched.

Paul Casey nearly pulled it off in 2010 when he was at No. 5 going into the Tour Championship and made a late surge at East Lake. If he had finished alone in second at the Tour Championship, he would have won the cup. He was in position late until tying for fourth.

One candidate this year might be Kevin Kisner. He is No. 17 going into The Barclays. A couple of top 3s to get in range and a runner-up finish at East Lake could make him a footnote in history. And a rich man.

NO-SHOWS: Rory McIlroy is sitting out The Barclays to give his ankle a precautionary week of rest. It shouldn't matter that much to McIlroy, who is No. 9 in the FedExCup. He is virtually assured of playing at East Lake and has two tournaments to move up the list.

Louis Oosthuizen (No. 28) is taking the week off with a sore back. Sergio Garcia (No. 31) is out for reasons unknown.

Francesco Molinari (No. 99) is home with a new baby, while Retief Goosen (No. 112) is not playing for personal reasons. Their seasons are over.

THE OTHER RACE: For several Americans in the field, these opening two playoff events might be worth more than just FedExCup points. The top 10 qualifiers for the Presidents Cup team will be determined after the Deutsche Bank Championship. Phil Mickelson is in dire need of a big week. He has qualified for every U.S. team for the last two decades and doesn't want to see that streak end.

Brooks Koepka set the Presidents Cup team as a goal at the start of the year. That's why he played last week in North Carolina. He wants to earn his way on the team.

The International team is decided by the world ranking. Among those on the bubble are Danny Lee, Steven Bowditch and John Senden.

By
Doug Ferguson

Series: PGA Tour

Published: Thursday, August 27, 2015 | 8:05 a.m.

EDISON, N.J. — The points are slightly different for the FedExCup playoffs. The principle remains unchanged.

For those who narrowly got into the top 125 to qualify for golf's ultimate bonus series, it's time to play well or go home. That applies to players such as Lee Westwood and Jason Dufner, Stewart Cink and Luke Donald, and possibly Adam Scott.

LEADERBOARD: The Barclays

Those with mediocre seasons on the PGA Tour — Phil Mickelson and Henrik Stenson are two who come to mind — they get at least two tournaments, maybe three, to play better golf and wind up at East Lake for the Tour Championship.

Jordan Spieth?

That's a tricky one. The No. 1 player in the world, and No. 1 in the FedExCup, all that really matters is winning the Tour Championship to capture the $10 million prize. Spieth could win three straight playoff events and finish runner-up at East Lake and finish second.

"After the major season is over, which is where we wanted to peak, we've sat back over the last week and said, 'How can we get that same kind of momentum to where we can try and peak for the Tour Championship?'" Spieth said.

The playoffs begin Thursday at The Barclays with a 120-man field because five players chose not to play for various reasons. For all the points that will be tossed around on television, the only math function that really matters is subtraction.

THROWBACK: The 2014 FedEx Cup playoffs in photos

Only 100 players advance to the Deutsche Bank Championship. From there, only 70 players move on to the BMW Championship. And that gets whittled down to the top 30 players who reach the Tour Championship.

Here's what to look for when The Barclays begins at Plainfield Country Club:

LONELY AT THE TOP: The No. 1 seed at the start of the playoffs has gone on to claim the $10 million prize just two times since the FedExCup began in 2007. This might not come as surprise, but both times involved Tiger Woods.

Woods has been No. 1 in the standings a record five times, including in 2008 when he stopped playing in June because of knee surgery.

That's because the points are reset going into the Tour Championship to give all 30 players a mathematical chance at winning the FedEx Cup. For all the top seeds, it's a matter of having your best week at East Lake. It's not that simple.

Here's where the eight FedExCup champions were seeded going into the playoffs: 1-7-1-3-15-19-9-69.

TOUR'S WORST NIGHTMARE: Because the points are quadrupled in value for the playoffs, there is a mathematical possibility that a player can win the FedExCup without ever having won a tournament all season. It hasn't happened — yet. But it's not that far-fetched.

Paul Casey nearly pulled it off in 2010 when he was at No. 5 going into the Tour Championship and made a late surge at East Lake. If he had finished alone in second at the Tour Championship, he would have won the cup. He was in position late until tying for fourth.

One candidate this year might be Kevin Kisner. He is No. 17 going into The Barclays. A couple of top 3s to get in range and a runner-up finish at East Lake could make him a footnote in history. And a rich man.

NO-SHOWS: Rory McIlroy is sitting out The Barclays to give his ankle a precautionary week of rest. It shouldn't matter that much to McIlroy, who is No. 9 in the FedExCup. He is virtually assured of playing at East Lake and has two tournaments to move up the list.

Louis Oosthuizen (No. 28) is taking the week off with a sore back. Sergio Garcia (No. 31) is out for reasons unknown.

Francesco Molinari (No. 99) is home with a new baby, while Retief Goosen (No. 112) is not playing for personal reasons. Their seasons are over.

THE OTHER RACE: For several Americans in the field, these opening two playoff events might be worth more than just FedExCup points. The top 10 qualifiers for the Presidents Cup team will be determined after the Deutsche Bank Championship. Phil Mickelson is in dire need of a big week. He has qualified for every U.S. team for the last two decades and doesn't want to see that streak end.

Brooks Koepka set the Presidents Cup team as a goal at the start of the year. That's why he played last week in North Carolina. He wants to earn his way on the team.

The International team is decided by the world ranking. Among those on the bubble are Danny Lee, Steven Bowditch and John Senden.


Christopher Cutler
Justin Taylor
Paul Gustafson
Trevor Dennis
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