.
Justin Borr
Michael Long

Notebook: Rory McIlroy says schedule more mental than physical

Rory McIlroy
USA Today Sports Images
Rory McIlroy says playing three consecutive tournaments are the ideal for his game.

NORTON, Mass. -- The European Tour went to great lengths to explain why Rory McIlroy is being allowed to compete in the season-ending Race to Dubai even though he won't reach the minimum 13 events when it ends with the DP World Tour Championship in Dubai.

McIlroy has played only nine European Tour events, missing out on three events (Scottish Open, British Open, WGC-Bridgestone Invitational) while recovering from injuries to the tendons in his left ankle.

"I have spent the last two weeks examining every angle and every possible solution and I have spoken with Rory and his team, as well as independent medical advisers and some prominent players," European Tour Chief Executive Keith Pelley said. "I am convinced that he could not commit to any further tournament participation without risking further injury and persistent weakness to the ankle in the future."

McIlroy, however, made it sound more mental than physical Thursday went asked about wanting to avoid playing three straight weeks.

"Even in years that I haven't injured myself, three I feel is always my number, even though ... I played four last year in the FedEx Cup and whatever," he said at the Deutsche Bank Championship. "I think three is sort of my limit. I can play three. And obviously, there's a physical element to it. But previously, and going forward, it's more a mental. Once you play three weeks in a row, I can feel myself just get a little bit agitated easier. So three weeks is my limit."

McIlroy returned to competition at Whistling Straits for the PGA Championship and said he was 100 percent, though he skipped the Barclays last week as a precaution to make sure there were no lingering issues with his ankle.

"Ankle is fine," he said. "Ankle is good enough to do what I need to do on the golf course. I won't be running on the soccer field anytime soon. But to run in a straight line, to walk a golf course, to play golf is totally fine."

BACK TO THE OLD: After one week, Jordan Spieth has his old set of irons in the bag for the Deutsche Bank Championship.

For a guy who has won two majors, has four PGA Tour victories and four runner-up finishes this year, why even change? Spieth said he normally changes out his irons once a year, and chose this time because he had a week at home between the PGA Championship and the start of the FedExCup playoffs.

He missed the cut at the Barclays, which Spieth attributed to his driving and wedges more than the irons. But he said he noticed a slight difference in the look of the iron and the way it cut through the grass.

With six days between his next event, he asked swing coach Cameron McCormick to come up to Boston — and bring the old clubs with him.

"At the end of the round, you're not going to sit there and blame the irons. You're going to blame yourself, as I should," Spieth said. "The problems I got in last week were with my driver and wedges. My irons were not the issue."

He said he would stick with the previous clubs through the Presidents Cup, "and then I'll find the right fit."

TEXTING TIGER: Jason Day has struck up a friendship with Tiger Woods, and the two often text back and forth, mainly about golf.

Along with his 79 wins on the PGA Tour, Woods wins at a 93 percent rate when he has at least a share of the 54-hole lead.

The trick for Day is interpreting the messages.

"We'll be talking about like finishing on Sundays and the process of stuff," Day said. "His text messages, I have to digest them a little bit more because he is very smart. And he has to kind of dumb it down to my level. I've got to try to think them through."

Day played with Woods the opening two rounds of the British Open, and they have played practice rounds together.

"With my team and then on top of it he's been the best player for ... arguably one of the best players of all time, who wouldn't want that mentorship from a player like that?" Day said. "Especially on the golf course. To be able to receive text messages and ask him questions and him being so open toward me has been fantastic."

BUBBA'S BACK: Bubba Watson skipped the Deutsche Bank Championship pro-am Thursday because of a mild back injury.

Watson suffered a mild strain of his back during the weekend of the Barclays, where he finished third. His agent, Jens Beck, says Watson received therapy the last few days. His trainer recommended one more day of rest as a precaution.

Watson is No. 3 in the FedExCup standings going into the second playoff event.

This is the second week in a row that a top player has missed the pro-am with a sore back. Jason Day felt a twinge during the week at The Barclays. He went on to a six-shot victory.

DIVOTS: Phil Mickelson has been mathematically eliminated from making the Presidents Cup team on his own. It will be the first time since 1993 — his first full year as a pro — that Mickelson did not qualify on his own for a Presidents Cup or Ryder Cup team. ... Will Wilcox, No. 89 in the FedExCup, has withdrawn with an injury. Only the top 70 advance to the next playoff events, so his season is over. ... Hunter Mahan, the only player to never miss a FedExCup playoff event, goes into this week at No. 91.

By
Doug Ferguson

Series: PGA Tour

Published: Thursday, September 03, 2015 | 9:33 p.m.

NORTON, Mass. -- The European Tour went to great lengths to explain why Rory McIlroy is being allowed to compete in the season-ending Race to Dubai even though he won't reach the minimum 13 events when it ends with the DP World Tour Championship in Dubai.

McIlroy has played only nine European Tour events, missing out on three events (Scottish Open, British Open, WGC-Bridgestone Invitational) while recovering from injuries to the tendons in his left ankle.

"I have spent the last two weeks examining every angle and every possible solution and I have spoken with Rory and his team, as well as independent medical advisers and some prominent players," European Tour Chief Executive Keith Pelley said. "I am convinced that he could not commit to any further tournament participation without risking further injury and persistent weakness to the ankle in the future."

McIlroy, however, made it sound more mental than physical Thursday went asked about wanting to avoid playing three straight weeks.

"Even in years that I haven't injured myself, three I feel is always my number, even though ... I played four last year in the FedEx Cup and whatever," he said at the Deutsche Bank Championship. "I think three is sort of my limit. I can play three. And obviously, there's a physical element to it. But previously, and going forward, it's more a mental. Once you play three weeks in a row, I can feel myself just get a little bit agitated easier. So three weeks is my limit."

McIlroy returned to competition at Whistling Straits for the PGA Championship and said he was 100 percent, though he skipped the Barclays last week as a precaution to make sure there were no lingering issues with his ankle.

"Ankle is fine," he said. "Ankle is good enough to do what I need to do on the golf course. I won't be running on the soccer field anytime soon. But to run in a straight line, to walk a golf course, to play golf is totally fine."

BACK TO THE OLD: After one week, Jordan Spieth has his old set of irons in the bag for the Deutsche Bank Championship.

For a guy who has won two majors, has four PGA Tour victories and four runner-up finishes this year, why even change? Spieth said he normally changes out his irons once a year, and chose this time because he had a week at home between the PGA Championship and the start of the FedExCup playoffs.

He missed the cut at the Barclays, which Spieth attributed to his driving and wedges more than the irons. But he said he noticed a slight difference in the look of the iron and the way it cut through the grass.

With six days between his next event, he asked swing coach Cameron McCormick to come up to Boston — and bring the old clubs with him.

"At the end of the round, you're not going to sit there and blame the irons. You're going to blame yourself, as I should," Spieth said. "The problems I got in last week were with my driver and wedges. My irons were not the issue."

He said he would stick with the previous clubs through the Presidents Cup, "and then I'll find the right fit."

TEXTING TIGER: Jason Day has struck up a friendship with Tiger Woods, and the two often text back and forth, mainly about golf.

Along with his 79 wins on the PGA Tour, Woods wins at a 93 percent rate when he has at least a share of the 54-hole lead.

The trick for Day is interpreting the messages.

"We'll be talking about like finishing on Sundays and the process of stuff," Day said. "His text messages, I have to digest them a little bit more because he is very smart. And he has to kind of dumb it down to my level. I've got to try to think them through."

Day played with Woods the opening two rounds of the British Open, and they have played practice rounds together.

"With my team and then on top of it he's been the best player for ... arguably one of the best players of all time, who wouldn't want that mentorship from a player like that?" Day said. "Especially on the golf course. To be able to receive text messages and ask him questions and him being so open toward me has been fantastic."

BUBBA'S BACK: Bubba Watson skipped the Deutsche Bank Championship pro-am Thursday because of a mild back injury.

Watson suffered a mild strain of his back during the weekend of the Barclays, where he finished third. His agent, Jens Beck, says Watson received therapy the last few days. His trainer recommended one more day of rest as a precaution.

Watson is No. 3 in the FedExCup standings going into the second playoff event.

This is the second week in a row that a top player has missed the pro-am with a sore back. Jason Day felt a twinge during the week at The Barclays. He went on to a six-shot victory.

DIVOTS: Phil Mickelson has been mathematically eliminated from making the Presidents Cup team on his own. It will be the first time since 1993 — his first full year as a pro — that Mickelson did not qualify on his own for a Presidents Cup or Ryder Cup team. ... Will Wilcox, No. 89 in the FedExCup, has withdrawn with an injury. Only the top 70 advance to the next playoff events, so his season is over. ... Hunter Mahan, the only player to never miss a FedExCup playoff event, goes into this week at No. 91.


Day, Spieth and McIlroy in battle of the new 'Big 3' at Deutsche Bank

Jordan Spieth and Jason Day
USA Today Sports Images
Both Jordan Spieth and Jason Day could dethrone Rory McIlroy from the world No. 1 spot this week.

NORTON, Mass. (AP) — Based more on current form than a mathematical formula, Jordan Spieth believes Jason Day is the No. 1 player in golf.

Day is coming off a six-shot victory in the opening FedExCup playoff event. In his previous tournament, Day became the first player to finish 20-under par in a major when he won the PGA Championship. He has won three of his past four tournaments.

TEE TIMES: Deutsche Bank Championship

"He's playing the best of anybody right now," Spieth said Thursday at the Deutsche Bank Championship. "Until somebody dethrones him — hopefully me this week — he's still that guy to beat right now."

Day has dreamed of being No. 1 in the world since before he even joined the PGA Tour. But he's interested in the ranking, not an opinion. That's why he points to Rory McIlroy and Spieth, the two guys ahead of him in the two-year ranking system.

"I can't say I'm the No. 1 player in the world right now," Day said. "I just can't do it. There's two guys ahead of me that have played phenomenal golf over the last two years. I've played good golf, but I really played fantastic golf just in the last seven weeks."

As for McIlroy?

He went back to No. 1 even though he didn't play last week. At least not in New Jersey.

"The world ranking people must have saw how I was playing at home," McIlroy said with a laugh.

Golf hasn't seen a three-man race for No. 1 at such a high level of play in more than 10 years. McIlroy, Spieth and Day each have a chance to get to No. 1 at the Deutsche Bank Championship, which starts Friday. Day would have to win. It's so close between No. 1 and No. 2 that Spieth has the easier road to the top this week.

INJURY REPORT: Watson pulls out of prom-am with back strain

Four players had a shot at No. 1 going into The Players Championship, though that was a matter of who got there by default.

This is different.

All three have an average of at least 10.99 points in the ranking. The previous time three players all had a double-digit average with No. 1 up for grabs was Vijay Singh, Tiger Woods and Ernie Els going into the 2005 Masters.

Woods was the youngest of that version of the "Big Three." He was 29.

Day is the oldest in this group. He's 27.

The first showdown starts Friday on the TPC Boston, even if none of them are looking at it that way.

REPEAT: Kirk looks for another win at Deutsche Bank

"I'm not focused on what either one is doing on the leaderboard unless they're in the lead," Spieth said. "And then if they're in the lead, how do I get up there and surpass them? But honestly, it has no effect off the course. We're working hard just to try to win the tournament. There's 100 guys this week that are fully capable of having four good days and winning this event. And hopefully, that can be."

Only 98 of the top 100 who advanced to the second playoff event are at the TPC Boston. Sergio Garcia isn't playing for the second straight week (he fell from No. 31 to No. 43) and Will Wilcox withdrew with an injury (his season is over).

The newest version of the Big Three were all at the course on Tuesday to get in some extra work.

Day would seem to have the least to work on given his play in recent weeks. He is battling a cold this week, though he was grinding away and feeling better about it. He believes that it's getting through practice on the tough days that set him up for winning because he knows he has put in the work.

IN THE BAG: Jason Day's Barclays-winning clubs

McIlroy took the past two weeks off after missing two months with an ankle injury, though he was playing last week in Florida.

Spieth is coming off a missed cut. He cut short his time in New York to meet coach Cameron McCormick at the TPC Boston. He was tempted to go home to Dallas, but realized he could practice longer on faster greens in Boston than in Dallas.

"Got a lot of good work in," Spieth said. "There wasn't much to fix. It was more what I was making up in my head. I was creating bigger problems than there really was, which I figured was the case. It's just nice to have him (McCormick) behind me letting me know that it looks good, you can produce all the ball flights, you can win with what you're doing right now. It hasn't changed."

The top 70 in the FedExCup advance to the third playoff event in two weeks north of Chicago. This week also is the final event to qualify for the Presidents Cup team.

Two years ago, Spieth closed with a 62 to get Fred Couples' attention as a captain's pick. Now he is No. 1 on the American team. And if enough goes his way this week, Spieth could go back to No. 1 in the world.

At least for the moment.

By
Doug Ferguson

Series: PGA Tour

Published: Thursday, September 03, 2015 | 7:14 p.m.

NORTON, Mass. (AP) — Based more on current form than a mathematical formula, Jordan Spieth believes Jason Day is the No. 1 player in golf.

Day is coming off a six-shot victory in the opening FedExCup playoff event. In his previous tournament, Day became the first player to finish 20-under par in a major when he won the PGA Championship. He has won three of his past four tournaments.

TEE TIMES: Deutsche Bank Championship

"He's playing the best of anybody right now," Spieth said Thursday at the Deutsche Bank Championship. "Until somebody dethrones him — hopefully me this week — he's still that guy to beat right now."

Day has dreamed of being No. 1 in the world since before he even joined the PGA Tour. But he's interested in the ranking, not an opinion. That's why he points to Rory McIlroy and Spieth, the two guys ahead of him in the two-year ranking system.

"I can't say I'm the No. 1 player in the world right now," Day said. "I just can't do it. There's two guys ahead of me that have played phenomenal golf over the last two years. I've played good golf, but I really played fantastic golf just in the last seven weeks."

As for McIlroy?

He went back to No. 1 even though he didn't play last week. At least not in New Jersey.

"The world ranking people must have saw how I was playing at home," McIlroy said with a laugh.

Golf hasn't seen a three-man race for No. 1 at such a high level of play in more than 10 years. McIlroy, Spieth and Day each have a chance to get to No. 1 at the Deutsche Bank Championship, which starts Friday. Day would have to win. It's so close between No. 1 and No. 2 that Spieth has the easier road to the top this week.

INJURY REPORT: Watson pulls out of prom-am with back strain

Four players had a shot at No. 1 going into The Players Championship, though that was a matter of who got there by default.

This is different.

All three have an average of at least 10.99 points in the ranking. The previous time three players all had a double-digit average with No. 1 up for grabs was Vijay Singh, Tiger Woods and Ernie Els going into the 2005 Masters.

Woods was the youngest of that version of the "Big Three." He was 29.

Day is the oldest in this group. He's 27.

The first showdown starts Friday on the TPC Boston, even if none of them are looking at it that way.

REPEAT: Kirk looks for another win at Deutsche Bank

"I'm not focused on what either one is doing on the leaderboard unless they're in the lead," Spieth said. "And then if they're in the lead, how do I get up there and surpass them? But honestly, it has no effect off the course. We're working hard just to try to win the tournament. There's 100 guys this week that are fully capable of having four good days and winning this event. And hopefully, that can be."

Only 98 of the top 100 who advanced to the second playoff event are at the TPC Boston. Sergio Garcia isn't playing for the second straight week (he fell from No. 31 to No. 43) and Will Wilcox withdrew with an injury (his season is over).

The newest version of the Big Three were all at the course on Tuesday to get in some extra work.

Day would seem to have the least to work on given his play in recent weeks. He is battling a cold this week, though he was grinding away and feeling better about it. He believes that it's getting through practice on the tough days that set him up for winning because he knows he has put in the work.

IN THE BAG: Jason Day's Barclays-winning clubs

McIlroy took the past two weeks off after missing two months with an ankle injury, though he was playing last week in Florida.

Spieth is coming off a missed cut. He cut short his time in New York to meet coach Cameron McCormick at the TPC Boston. He was tempted to go home to Dallas, but realized he could practice longer on faster greens in Boston than in Dallas.

"Got a lot of good work in," Spieth said. "There wasn't much to fix. It was more what I was making up in my head. I was creating bigger problems than there really was, which I figured was the case. It's just nice to have him (McCormick) behind me letting me know that it looks good, you can produce all the ball flights, you can win with what you're doing right now. It hasn't changed."

The top 70 in the FedExCup advance to the third playoff event in two weeks north of Chicago. This week also is the final event to qualify for the Presidents Cup team.

Two years ago, Spieth closed with a 62 to get Fred Couples' attention as a captain's pick. Now he is No. 1 on the American team. And if enough goes his way this week, Spieth could go back to No. 1 in the world.

At least for the moment.


Scott Jamieson and Daniel Gaunt lead on first day of Russian Open

MOSCOW, Russia -- Scott Jamieson and Daniel Gaunt took a share of the lead at the M2M Russian Open with 6-under 65s in Thursday's first round.

Jamieson started his day at Skolkovo Golf Club with four straight birdies. Gaunt had an eagle on No. 12.

WHAT TO WATCH: This week in golf

Lee Slattery and Bradley Dredge (both 66) are tied for third place, one stroke ahead of a group of eight others, including Made in Denmark winner David Horsey.

Former top-ranked tennis player Yevgeny Kafelnikov shot a 77 and was tied for 121st.


Series: European Tour

Published: Thursday, September 03, 2015 | 5:09 p.m.

MOSCOW, Russia -- Scott Jamieson and Daniel Gaunt took a share of the lead at the M2M Russian Open with 6-under 65s in Thursday's first round.

Jamieson started his day at Skolkovo Golf Club with four straight birdies. Gaunt had an eagle on No. 12.

WHAT TO WATCH: This week in golf

Lee Slattery and Bradley Dredge (both 66) are tied for third place, one stroke ahead of a group of eight others, including Made in Denmark winner David Horsey.

Former top-ranked tennis player Yevgeny Kafelnikov shot a 77 and was tied for 121st.


Bubba Watson sits out Deutsche Bank pro-am with back strain

Bubba Watson
USA Today Sports Images
Bubba Watson will take one more day of rest for a minor back strain.

NORTON, Mass. -- Two-time Masters champion Bubba Watson skipped the Deutsche Bank Championship pro-am Thursday because of a mild back injury.

Watson suffered a mild strain of his back during the weekend of the Barclays, where he finished third. His agent, Jens Beck, says Watson received therapy the last few days. His trainer recommended one more day of rest as a precaution.

TEE TIMES: Deutsche Bank Championship

Watson is No. 3 in the FedExCup standings going into the second playoff event.

This is the second week in a row that a top player has missed the pro-am with a sore back. Jason Day felt a twinge during the week at the Barclays. He went on to a six-shot victory.


Series: PGA Tour

Published: Thursday, September 03, 2015 | 5:05 p.m.

NORTON, Mass. -- Two-time Masters champion Bubba Watson skipped the Deutsche Bank Championship pro-am Thursday because of a mild back injury.

Watson suffered a mild strain of his back during the weekend of the Barclays, where he finished third. His agent, Jens Beck, says Watson received therapy the last few days. His trainer recommended one more day of rest as a precaution.

TEE TIMES: Deutsche Bank Championship

Watson is No. 3 in the FedExCup standings going into the second playoff event.

This is the second week in a row that a top player has missed the pro-am with a sore back. Jason Day felt a twinge during the week at the Barclays. He went on to a six-shot victory.


Chris Kirk, with hand healing, hopes to repeat Deutsche Bank victory

Chris Kirk
USA Today Sports Images
Chris Kirk is still working his game back into shape after recovering from a broken hand earlier this summer.

Summer, in an ideal world, is all about hanging at home with the family, kicking back and relaxing until "real life" begins in the fall.

Sounds perfect for the regular folks with 9-to-5 jobs who have a hard time getting work done while the nice weather draws their attention away from the task at hand.

It's not ideal for a professional golfer.

That's what Chris Kirk, the defending champion of the Deutsche Bank Championship, has had to deal with this year.

TEE TIMES: Deutsche Bank Championship

Kirk broke his right hand in June when he fell while playing with his kids in the backyard. The injury wiped out six weeks of his tour schedule.

"I was chasing my kids around in the yard," Kirk said. "My feet basically went out from under me and kind of reaching my hand back a little bit, just landed not very good on it and cracked the last metacarpal about midway on my right hand.

"It wasn't a really bad break or anything like that, it wasn't displaced or anything."

It was enough to keep him from playing golf until last week in the first tournament of the FedExCup playoffs. Kirk was playing solid golf before the injury, winning his only tournament of the year at the Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial. That win helped get the 30-year-old in the field of 99 this week at TPC Boston because he played in the U.S. Open in June and didn't return to competitive golf for two months.

Kirk missed the cut last week at the Barclays after a first-round 76, and is currently 39th in the FedExCup standings.

"I didn't play as well as I would have liked," Kirk said. "But it was nice just getting back out there and knocking a little bit of rust off. Most importantly my hand felt great."

Kirk received treatment at the University of Georgia near his home in Athens and was in physical therapy about a week and a half after the fall happened. He was cleared to play and practice fully a few weeks before the Barclays, but chose to continue to rest until he felt no pain in his hand.

"I waited long enough where it didn't hurt me to hit balls," Kirk said. "The first day or two coming back hitting balls on the range there is a little bit of just getting yourself to trust it and go ahead and swing full, through down into the ground, and trust that it's not going to hurt."

If comfort in the hand is OK for him now, then comfort at TPC Boston is certainly there as well. Kirk finished off his Deutsche Bank win last year with a bogey-free, 5-under 66 to edge Geoff Ogilvy, Billy Horschel and Russell Henley by two strokes.

He was 14-under in his last 37 holes a year ago and really opened eyes with his putting. Even with the recent injury, he was able to take the splint off his hand early and putt whenever he felt comfortable. That gives him hope that he finds the stroke that made him a champion here a year ago, even if he didn't see that guy last week at the Barclays.

Kirk opens defense of his title Friday, when he steps to the 10th tee with playing partners Webb Simpson and Louis Oosthuizen at 1:04 p.m.

"This has been one of my favorite tournaments of the year," Kirk said. "I've always loved the golf course."

This article was written by Tom Layman from Boston Herald and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

By
Tom Layman

Series: PGA Tour

Published: Thursday, September 03, 2015 | 12:03 p.m.

Summer, in an ideal world, is all about hanging at home with the family, kicking back and relaxing until "real life" begins in the fall.

Sounds perfect for the regular folks with 9-to-5 jobs who have a hard time getting work done while the nice weather draws their attention away from the task at hand.

It's not ideal for a professional golfer.

That's what Chris Kirk, the defending champion of the Deutsche Bank Championship, has had to deal with this year.

TEE TIMES: Deutsche Bank Championship

Kirk broke his right hand in June when he fell while playing with his kids in the backyard. The injury wiped out six weeks of his tour schedule.

"I was chasing my kids around in the yard," Kirk said. "My feet basically went out from under me and kind of reaching my hand back a little bit, just landed not very good on it and cracked the last metacarpal about midway on my right hand.

"It wasn't a really bad break or anything like that, it wasn't displaced or anything."

It was enough to keep him from playing golf until last week in the first tournament of the FedExCup playoffs. Kirk was playing solid golf before the injury, winning his only tournament of the year at the Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial. That win helped get the 30-year-old in the field of 99 this week at TPC Boston because he played in the U.S. Open in June and didn't return to competitive golf for two months.

Kirk missed the cut last week at the Barclays after a first-round 76, and is currently 39th in the FedExCup standings.

"I didn't play as well as I would have liked," Kirk said. "But it was nice just getting back out there and knocking a little bit of rust off. Most importantly my hand felt great."

Kirk received treatment at the University of Georgia near his home in Athens and was in physical therapy about a week and a half after the fall happened. He was cleared to play and practice fully a few weeks before the Barclays, but chose to continue to rest until he felt no pain in his hand.

"I waited long enough where it didn't hurt me to hit balls," Kirk said. "The first day or two coming back hitting balls on the range there is a little bit of just getting yourself to trust it and go ahead and swing full, through down into the ground, and trust that it's not going to hurt."

If comfort in the hand is OK for him now, then comfort at TPC Boston is certainly there as well. Kirk finished off his Deutsche Bank win last year with a bogey-free, 5-under 66 to edge Geoff Ogilvy, Billy Horschel and Russell Henley by two strokes.

He was 14-under in his last 37 holes a year ago and really opened eyes with his putting. Even with the recent injury, he was able to take the splint off his hand early and putt whenever he felt comfortable. That gives him hope that he finds the stroke that made him a champion here a year ago, even if he didn't see that guy last week at the Barclays.

Kirk opens defense of his title Friday, when he steps to the 10th tee with playing partners Webb Simpson and Louis Oosthuizen at 1:04 p.m.

"This has been one of my favorite tournaments of the year," Kirk said. "I've always loved the golf course."

This article was written by Tom Layman from Boston Herald and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Benjamin Mills
Benjamin Jaklin
Jennifer Parker
Syndicate content