.

New Big Three: McIlroy, Spieth, Day?

Jason Day
USA Today Sports Images
With four wins this season, including the PGA Championship, Jason Day is making his case as the No. 1 golfer in the world.

EDISON, N.J. (AP) — Jordan Spieth was gone, but not forgotten, certainly not by Jason Day.

In his debut as the No. 1 player in the world, Spieth had back-to-back rounds over par for the first time all year and missed the cut. He already was assured of losing the No. 1 ranking back to Rory McIlroy when Day put together a weekend at The Barclays that was even better when put into recent context.

He shot 63-62 on the weekend — the 62 was the lowest closing round by a PGA Tour winner all year — and finished at 19-under 261 for a six-shot win over Henrik Stenson. This was Day's first tournament since he became the first player in a major to reach 20-under par in beating Spieth by three shots at the PGA Championship.

Throw in the Canadian Open and Day has won three of his last four tournaments.

So it seemed to be a natural question who would get his vote as PGA Tour player of the year, which until last week was not really a question at all.

And it still isn't to Day — not yet, anyway.

"Right now, Jordan Spieth gets my vote," Day said. "Winning two major championships at such a young age is big. Winning four tournaments overall is great."

Then again, there are still three FedEx Cup playoff events remaining, including the Tour Championship that determines the $10 million bonus. It's already been a banner summer for the 27-year-old Australian, and he's not done yet.

"I think winning the FedEx Cup and maybe one or two more tournaments, that could put my name in the mix for player of the year," Day said. "I'm not sure. I'm going to leave that to the peers, to the people. That will definitely throw my name in the mix."

Spieth already has locked up the points-based award from the PGA of America because of a bonus awarded to multiple major champions, and that's not something to take lightly. The 22-year-old Texan is only the 19th player in 120 years to do that. As only the fourth player to get halfway to the Grand Slam, he handled the pressure by finishing one shot out of a playoff at St. Andrews. And with a runner-up at the PGA Championship, Spieth joined Tiger Woods and Jack Nicklaus as the only players to finish in the top four at all four majors.

He also was runner-up three other times (Houston Open, Texas Open, Colonial), still is nearly $3 million ahead of Day on the money list and is leading the Vardon Trophy for the lowest adjusted scoring average on the PGA Tour.

That's why Day was quick not to dismiss Spieth.

If the Australian were to win the Tour Championship, that makes it interesting, but still probably not enough. The Tour Championship and one other FedEx Cup playoff event? That would be six wins — only Woods and Vijay Singh have done that over the last 20 years — and then it moves the vote closer to a coin flip.

"I'm by far playing the best golf of my life," Day said. "Just the synergy between my golf swing right now and what I've done with my body is working. I'm hitting it a long, long way. I feel like the accuracy has pulled in. ... I feel like Jordan Spieth with how I'm putting. It's a good feeling."

Another race is shaping up that could prove to be more compelling.

A year ago, when McIlroy won the final two majors with a World Golf Championship in between, he was so clearly No. 1 in the world that the only discussion was who could challenge him. Spieth and Day provided the answer, with four wins apiece on the PGA Tour, and three of the four majors.

Day will have a mathematical chance to reach No. 1 if he were to win the Deutsche Bank Championship. There was chatter about a modern Big Three after Day won the PGA Championship, and this victory in the Barclays, along with his realistic chance of getting to No. 1, only confirms it.

McIlroy didn't play The Barclays to give his left ankle one more week of rest as a precaution. He tied for 17th in the PGA Championship, his first time competing in nearly two months, and he has won on the TPC Boston.

Spieth has a knack for bouncing back quickly. The last time he missed a cut was at The Players, and over his next eight starts he had two wins (including the U.S. Open), two runner-up finishes and two third-place finishes. The TPC Boston is where his stock really began to rise two years ago when he closed with a 62.

Yes, the majors are over.

Golf still has the potential to be plenty compelling over the next four weeks. That's what the PGA Tour wanted.

Only it has nothing to do with $10 million.

This article was written by Doug Ferguson from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

By
Doug Ferguson

Series: PGA Tour

Published: Monday, August 31, 2015 | 3:24 p.m.

EDISON, N.J. (AP) — Jordan Spieth was gone, but not forgotten, certainly not by Jason Day.

In his debut as the No. 1 player in the world, Spieth had back-to-back rounds over par for the first time all year and missed the cut. He already was assured of losing the No. 1 ranking back to Rory McIlroy when Day put together a weekend at The Barclays that was even better when put into recent context.

He shot 63-62 on the weekend — the 62 was the lowest closing round by a PGA Tour winner all year — and finished at 19-under 261 for a six-shot win over Henrik Stenson. This was Day's first tournament since he became the first player in a major to reach 20-under par in beating Spieth by three shots at the PGA Championship.

Throw in the Canadian Open and Day has won three of his last four tournaments.

So it seemed to be a natural question who would get his vote as PGA Tour player of the year, which until last week was not really a question at all.

And it still isn't to Day — not yet, anyway.

"Right now, Jordan Spieth gets my vote," Day said. "Winning two major championships at such a young age is big. Winning four tournaments overall is great."

Then again, there are still three FedEx Cup playoff events remaining, including the Tour Championship that determines the $10 million bonus. It's already been a banner summer for the 27-year-old Australian, and he's not done yet.

"I think winning the FedEx Cup and maybe one or two more tournaments, that could put my name in the mix for player of the year," Day said. "I'm not sure. I'm going to leave that to the peers, to the people. That will definitely throw my name in the mix."

Spieth already has locked up the points-based award from the PGA of America because of a bonus awarded to multiple major champions, and that's not something to take lightly. The 22-year-old Texan is only the 19th player in 120 years to do that. As only the fourth player to get halfway to the Grand Slam, he handled the pressure by finishing one shot out of a playoff at St. Andrews. And with a runner-up at the PGA Championship, Spieth joined Tiger Woods and Jack Nicklaus as the only players to finish in the top four at all four majors.

He also was runner-up three other times (Houston Open, Texas Open, Colonial), still is nearly $3 million ahead of Day on the money list and is leading the Vardon Trophy for the lowest adjusted scoring average on the PGA Tour.

That's why Day was quick not to dismiss Spieth.

If the Australian were to win the Tour Championship, that makes it interesting, but still probably not enough. The Tour Championship and one other FedEx Cup playoff event? That would be six wins — only Woods and Vijay Singh have done that over the last 20 years — and then it moves the vote closer to a coin flip.

"I'm by far playing the best golf of my life," Day said. "Just the synergy between my golf swing right now and what I've done with my body is working. I'm hitting it a long, long way. I feel like the accuracy has pulled in. ... I feel like Jordan Spieth with how I'm putting. It's a good feeling."

Another race is shaping up that could prove to be more compelling.

A year ago, when McIlroy won the final two majors with a World Golf Championship in between, he was so clearly No. 1 in the world that the only discussion was who could challenge him. Spieth and Day provided the answer, with four wins apiece on the PGA Tour, and three of the four majors.

Day will have a mathematical chance to reach No. 1 if he were to win the Deutsche Bank Championship. There was chatter about a modern Big Three after Day won the PGA Championship, and this victory in the Barclays, along with his realistic chance of getting to No. 1, only confirms it.

McIlroy didn't play The Barclays to give his left ankle one more week of rest as a precaution. He tied for 17th in the PGA Championship, his first time competing in nearly two months, and he has won on the TPC Boston.

Spieth has a knack for bouncing back quickly. The last time he missed a cut was at The Players, and over his next eight starts he had two wins (including the U.S. Open), two runner-up finishes and two third-place finishes. The TPC Boston is where his stock really began to rise two years ago when he closed with a 62.

Yes, the majors are over.

Golf still has the potential to be plenty compelling over the next four weeks. That's what the PGA Tour wanted.

Only it has nothing to do with $10 million.

This article was written by Doug Ferguson from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Kansas father, son ace same hole on back-to-back shots

Hilst
Debbie Hilst/Hutchinson News
Father and son, Kent and Keaton Hilst, pose after making rare back-to-back aces on the same hole.

HUTCHINSON, Kansas -- After Kent, Keaton and Kalen Hilst teed off on the par-3, 128-yard fourth hole at Cottonwood Hills on Wednesday, August 19, Kalen rolled his eyes at his dad and big brother and gave them a stern look.

Facetiously, he told them something along the lines of, "I really don't like you guys very much."

Poor Kalen had hit his shot to around 25-feet from the pin. He'd eventually make an easy, ho-hum par.

But Kalen was the man in the middle of history. He was sandwiched in between an astronomic feat, a one-in-many-millions occurrence. Right before his shot, his older brother, Keaton, made his first career hole-in-one. Immediately following his shot, his dad, Kent, made his second career ace.

"I hit it about 25 feet away," Kalen said. "But found out afterwards I was just taking the boring and conservative approach. I kind of joked with them after they both went in that I was the only one who had to pull the putter out of the bag."

Having a father and son each hit an ace on the same hole a minute from each other may never happen again in this lifetime. Plus, another family member of the group playing between the two shots may never be topped. Certainly, it's far-fetched to think the family matriarch will catch something like this on camera again the way Debbie Hilst documented it.

Lots of factors were perfectly placed together to make this one-in-many millions occurrence even more special. The trio had never played at Cottonwood Hills together. Below is the oral history of the event through the lens of the Hilst family and others who were involved.

Usually the Hilst clan plays their home course, Prairie Dunes. But for some reason, they got the itch to try out the recently re-opened Cottonwood Hills. Keaton's job, which moved him to Kansas City, brought him to Hutchinson more frequently this summer. The day after this gorgeous Wednesday afternoon, Kalen was set to go back to start his sophomore year in Lawrence at the University of Kansas.

Kent: "Normally we'd play at Prairie Dunes. But my son's birthday, Keaton's birthday, was six days before that. I said 'you want to go out to Cottonwood Hills and do something different for your birthday?' or whatever. He said 'yeah, that sounds like fun.' So that was the first time we've been out there since they reopened. Kalen I don't think had ever played there and Keaton and I had maybe played there once or twice when it was open before. It was a different choice. Apparently a wise choice."

Kalen: "We usually just play Prairie Dunes and I left for college on Thursday and I wanted to golf with them my last day because my brother was in town. I actually recommended Sand Creek Station in Newton but my dad knew I had never played Cottonwood before and said it would be something different."

Debbie isn't a golfer. Yet she loves to follow along and spend time with her family. She wanted to try out her new camera that has enhanced video capabilities. She has a hobby for filming and capturing her family's most cherished memories. Thus, with an extra spot in a cart readily available, the stars aligned for mom to come and witness history. And film nearly every shot of the round to boot.

Kent: "She's really into photography and videos. She's done this numerous times. Certainly not close to all the time, but it's not an unusual thing for her to do. She'd never been out there. Since there was three of us, we were going to have two carts, we were like 'come along.' "

Debbie: "Keaton was home, Kalen was going to school the next day at KU, so I thought I would go out with the guys. I don't go every time because sometimes if they golf with other people, they don't want me around, you know. That day, I had never been to Cottonwood Hills. I had a new camera where you can film and you can pick off pictures. It's really the first time I've used it at all."

Yet, Debbie almost didn't tag along. Her parents were in town and she wanted to be a great host. Luckily, they left right before a 3:40 p.m. tee time and understood she was anxious to spend some time with her boys and husband. Another domino fell perfectly into place.

Debbie: "No, I was really close to staying home because I didn't want to be rude, you know. Anyway, I guess it all worked out for the best because all of the picture-taking I have done and video, I would have been excited for them, but I would have been like 'oh, man, I missed the Kodak moment.' "

Kalen: "They left five minutes before we did so it ended up working out so she could come."

After three holes, none of the Hilsts were playing particularly well. But the old adage that one shot can change everything fully came into fruition when they entered the short, par-3 fourth. The pin was not placed at too treacherous of a location, toward the front of a relatively flat, 33-yard deep green on the course's signature hole. It played 128 yards and the wind was especially benign for Kansas standards. Keaton, a former low-handicapper who tries to play one round every few weeks, teed off from the green tees first and pulled out a gap wedge, about 52 degrees of loft, at 4:29 p.m.

Keaton: "I'd gotten off to a really bad start, so I wasn't really super happy."

Kent: "Keaton's shot was just beautiful. It was high, towering at the pin the whole time."

Keaton: "I just hit a good one that was going right toward the flag the whole time. It kind of bounced right beside it and snuck back in. It was kind of a shock I guess... It was high, like I said, it bounced about three inches right of the hole, bounced past a little bit and spun back in."

Kalen: "He was pretty calm, I think he was more shocked than anything because he didn't really celebrate until after my shot, basically."

Kent: "He's a pretty laid back individual, but you could tell he was pretty thrilled that he had done this."

Keaton: "I just dropped my club. Raised my arms. I didn't really know how to react."

Kalen: "My brother made his and my dad was more excited than he was. I was probably more excited than he was too."

Like every shot when she's in attendance, Debbie was filming. However, while the ball was coming down, she pressed the off button.

Debbie: "I got behind him so I could see the flag, so I tried to aim. Kalen was in the right. Kalen came over to tee up, so I shut the camera off and I heard Kent yelling 'it went in, it went in.' So I saw it real quick so I got that excitement."

Kalen: "When he hit, I knew it looked good but I went and teed up my ball right after he had hit and we watched it back on film and I blocked it in from the camera so you can't see my brother's go in. My brother was joking with me, 'how could you do that?' "

Debbie: "My little one got in momma's way. I don't yell at them when they're golfing. I don't say 'hey get out of my way.' You know I have so much golf (footage) that I'd never dreamed they'd go in. So sometimes I shut the camera off."

But she got the aftermath. And now realized how to shoot the next shots. Kalen went next. He only hit a green in regulation.

Keaton (laughing): "All he did was hit to about 20 feet and make par, so he's kind of a bum."

After Kalen's shot, Kent teed up at 4:30 p.m. He said both his sons get an assist for his second career ace.

Kent: "The reality of it is I hit last, and I saw what my sons hit and I had a 9-iron in my hand and went back and switched it to a pitching wedge after I saw what they did. Had I hit first, I would not of had a hole-in-one. Maybe I would have still made it, but I would have had to mishit a 9-iron. I mean I hit my shot really, really well."

Going into his shot, Kent, a low-handicapper who usually plays once or twice a week, didn't have the faintest idea history would repeat itself a minute later. Keaton actually wasn't on the tee box for his dad's ace because he wandered down by the cart to get something.

Kent: "I wasn't thinking obviously about 'hey, let's put one in on top.' I don't know if I was thinking about that or not...I hit a really good shot. It was right on line the whole time. It landed in front of the hole, about 10 feet short and bounced on in the hole. I think as I recall I yelled, 'it's in' and just started laughing. Just because what are the chances of this happening?"

Debbie: "Then when Kent golfed, he was the only one in the picture. I got him and I could see the flag. So I filmed all the way through. You can see his go in. He went crazy."

Kent: "(Keaton) thought I was just joking around. It was pretty surreal. I don't know if that was a plus for him or if I took some of his limelight away. But I think it will be a more memorable thing when you have two of them, especially a father-son combination. It's pretty cool."

Keaton: "I was down there and heard him screaming. He said something like 'I did it too.' I thought he was playing a little joke, but then it seemed pretty legit. I wasn't 100 percent sure until I saw two balls in the hole, though."

Kent: "I had a joke with him. I told him for about two minutes you had the same number of career hole-in-ones as I did...I've doubled the number of hole-in-ones I've seen on that hole."

Keaton: "I tied him for 30 seconds, but I guess he had enough of that. He took the lead again."

Kent: "I had only done it once in my life, here I do it immediately after he does it, you know this is just freakish."

It's not particularly easy to keep focus after an occurrence like this unfolds. The rest of the round, the magnificence of the moment started to sink in.

Kent: "I cannot say the golf was brilliant after we were finished. We didn't really care too much what the score added up to once it was done."

Keaton: "Right after that I sent about four or five group texts about it. No one believed me. I posted on Facebook and everybody's commenting 'oh yeah right,' that sort of thing. I wouldn't believe anyone who told me it. Can't really blame them I guess."

Kalen: "I knew when it happened that the odds were very much stacked against us. But I didn't know exactly how ridiculous it was until my uncle Rusty being the math genius that he is came up with the million odds, then it kind of hit how rare that is."

Keaton: "Just crazy, and it's never going to happen again. Kind of surreal at first, but it kind of sunk in as the day went on and it didn't really matter what anybody shot. It was fun."

Debbie was glad her passion for photographing and videotaping her kids' big moments over the years led to capturing this moment. Plus, Kent played a Titleist 8. Keaton used a No. 1 ball. Kent was the eighth-born child while Keaton was the oldest of his siblings.

Debbie: "I have taken pictures since when Keaton (was born). I didn't really take too many (before), but when he was born I went kind of nuts you might say. I got into it then."

At the turn, news came into the clubhouse. Cottonwood Hills' Justin Alldritt said everyone was aghast. It was the perfect cherry on top to a pleasant first summer after reopening.

Alldritt: "That's when everyone in the clubhouse looked up and was like, 'woah, never heard of that happening before.' "

The staff relayed the news to course pro Matt Seitz, a friend of the Hilst's. He was giddy and off site.

Seitz: "I was just as happy can be for the family. I actually felt a little bad for Kalen because he was playing too and he got locked out. The poor guy just can't make a hole-in-one to keep up with his dad and big brother. It's a good golfing family, and I was just happy for them. It's good to see."

Years ago, two players in Hesston aced the same hole in a match. Playing a PGA Midwest Section tournament in Kansas City over a decade ago, Seitz, who's been a pro for over three decades, remembers two pros acing the same hole a group ahead of him. But a father and son on the same hole? This is something you don't see every decade.

Seitz: "As we all know, hole-in-ones, the odds are astronomical. Same group even more so and then you have a father-son do it on top of that, it's probably easier to get struck by lightning than to have that happen. As far as father-son happening on the same hole, I've never heard of that happening."

Keaton: "Last couple days I've tried to Google anywhere else it's happened before. I couldn't really find any. It's pretty nuts."

Seitz has five career aces. So does Rusty Hilst. Rusty, Kent's older brother, picked up his most recent on April 25th on No. 4 at Prairie Dunes. He had a 33-year lapse between aces. Rusty is a fixture in the Kansas golf community. He's seen and heard it all. But this was something new.

Rusty: "I'd say I've been involved in helping run golf tournaments for the Kansas Golf Association for 40 years. I've never seen two hole-in-ones in the same group. Yeah, this was certainly one of the rarest things I've ever seen or heard of. It's a fun occurrence."

This article was written by Tommy Dahlk from The Hutchinson News, Kan. and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

By
Tommy Dahlk

Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Monday, August 31, 2015 | 12:49 p.m.

HUTCHINSON, Kansas -- After Kent, Keaton and Kalen Hilst teed off on the par-3, 128-yard fourth hole at Cottonwood Hills on Wednesday, August 19, Kalen rolled his eyes at his dad and big brother and gave them a stern look.

Facetiously, he told them something along the lines of, "I really don't like you guys very much."

Poor Kalen had hit his shot to around 25-feet from the pin. He'd eventually make an easy, ho-hum par.

But Kalen was the man in the middle of history. He was sandwiched in between an astronomic feat, a one-in-many-millions occurrence. Right before his shot, his older brother, Keaton, made his first career hole-in-one. Immediately following his shot, his dad, Kent, made his second career ace.

"I hit it about 25 feet away," Kalen said. "But found out afterwards I was just taking the boring and conservative approach. I kind of joked with them after they both went in that I was the only one who had to pull the putter out of the bag."

Having a father and son each hit an ace on the same hole a minute from each other may never happen again in this lifetime. Plus, another family member of the group playing between the two shots may never be topped. Certainly, it's far-fetched to think the family matriarch will catch something like this on camera again the way Debbie Hilst documented it.

Lots of factors were perfectly placed together to make this one-in-many millions occurrence even more special. The trio had never played at Cottonwood Hills together. Below is the oral history of the event through the lens of the Hilst family and others who were involved.

Usually the Hilst clan plays their home course, Prairie Dunes. But for some reason, they got the itch to try out the recently re-opened Cottonwood Hills. Keaton's job, which moved him to Kansas City, brought him to Hutchinson more frequently this summer. The day after this gorgeous Wednesday afternoon, Kalen was set to go back to start his sophomore year in Lawrence at the University of Kansas.

Kent: "Normally we'd play at Prairie Dunes. But my son's birthday, Keaton's birthday, was six days before that. I said 'you want to go out to Cottonwood Hills and do something different for your birthday?' or whatever. He said 'yeah, that sounds like fun.' So that was the first time we've been out there since they reopened. Kalen I don't think had ever played there and Keaton and I had maybe played there once or twice when it was open before. It was a different choice. Apparently a wise choice."

Kalen: "We usually just play Prairie Dunes and I left for college on Thursday and I wanted to golf with them my last day because my brother was in town. I actually recommended Sand Creek Station in Newton but my dad knew I had never played Cottonwood before and said it would be something different."

Debbie isn't a golfer. Yet she loves to follow along and spend time with her family. She wanted to try out her new camera that has enhanced video capabilities. She has a hobby for filming and capturing her family's most cherished memories. Thus, with an extra spot in a cart readily available, the stars aligned for mom to come and witness history. And film nearly every shot of the round to boot.

Kent: "She's really into photography and videos. She's done this numerous times. Certainly not close to all the time, but it's not an unusual thing for her to do. She'd never been out there. Since there was three of us, we were going to have two carts, we were like 'come along.' "

Debbie: "Keaton was home, Kalen was going to school the next day at KU, so I thought I would go out with the guys. I don't go every time because sometimes if they golf with other people, they don't want me around, you know. That day, I had never been to Cottonwood Hills. I had a new camera where you can film and you can pick off pictures. It's really the first time I've used it at all."

Yet, Debbie almost didn't tag along. Her parents were in town and she wanted to be a great host. Luckily, they left right before a 3:40 p.m. tee time and understood she was anxious to spend some time with her boys and husband. Another domino fell perfectly into place.

Debbie: "No, I was really close to staying home because I didn't want to be rude, you know. Anyway, I guess it all worked out for the best because all of the picture-taking I have done and video, I would have been excited for them, but I would have been like 'oh, man, I missed the Kodak moment.' "

Kalen: "They left five minutes before we did so it ended up working out so she could come."

After three holes, none of the Hilsts were playing particularly well. But the old adage that one shot can change everything fully came into fruition when they entered the short, par-3 fourth. The pin was not placed at too treacherous of a location, toward the front of a relatively flat, 33-yard deep green on the course's signature hole. It played 128 yards and the wind was especially benign for Kansas standards. Keaton, a former low-handicapper who tries to play one round every few weeks, teed off from the green tees first and pulled out a gap wedge, about 52 degrees of loft, at 4:29 p.m.

Keaton: "I'd gotten off to a really bad start, so I wasn't really super happy."

Kent: "Keaton's shot was just beautiful. It was high, towering at the pin the whole time."

Keaton: "I just hit a good one that was going right toward the flag the whole time. It kind of bounced right beside it and snuck back in. It was kind of a shock I guess... It was high, like I said, it bounced about three inches right of the hole, bounced past a little bit and spun back in."

Kalen: "He was pretty calm, I think he was more shocked than anything because he didn't really celebrate until after my shot, basically."

Kent: "He's a pretty laid back individual, but you could tell he was pretty thrilled that he had done this."

Keaton: "I just dropped my club. Raised my arms. I didn't really know how to react."

Kalen: "My brother made his and my dad was more excited than he was. I was probably more excited than he was too."

Like every shot when she's in attendance, Debbie was filming. However, while the ball was coming down, she pressed the off button.

Debbie: "I got behind him so I could see the flag, so I tried to aim. Kalen was in the right. Kalen came over to tee up, so I shut the camera off and I heard Kent yelling 'it went in, it went in.' So I saw it real quick so I got that excitement."

Kalen: "When he hit, I knew it looked good but I went and teed up my ball right after he had hit and we watched it back on film and I blocked it in from the camera so you can't see my brother's go in. My brother was joking with me, 'how could you do that?' "

Debbie: "My little one got in momma's way. I don't yell at them when they're golfing. I don't say 'hey get out of my way.' You know I have so much golf (footage) that I'd never dreamed they'd go in. So sometimes I shut the camera off."

But she got the aftermath. And now realized how to shoot the next shots. Kalen went next. He only hit a green in regulation.

Keaton (laughing): "All he did was hit to about 20 feet and make par, so he's kind of a bum."

After Kalen's shot, Kent teed up at 4:30 p.m. He said both his sons get an assist for his second career ace.

Kent: "The reality of it is I hit last, and I saw what my sons hit and I had a 9-iron in my hand and went back and switched it to a pitching wedge after I saw what they did. Had I hit first, I would not of had a hole-in-one. Maybe I would have still made it, but I would have had to mishit a 9-iron. I mean I hit my shot really, really well."

Going into his shot, Kent, a low-handicapper who usually plays once or twice a week, didn't have the faintest idea history would repeat itself a minute later. Keaton actually wasn't on the tee box for his dad's ace because he wandered down by the cart to get something.

Kent: "I wasn't thinking obviously about 'hey, let's put one in on top.' I don't know if I was thinking about that or not...I hit a really good shot. It was right on line the whole time. It landed in front of the hole, about 10 feet short and bounced on in the hole. I think as I recall I yelled, 'it's in' and just started laughing. Just because what are the chances of this happening?"

Debbie: "Then when Kent golfed, he was the only one in the picture. I got him and I could see the flag. So I filmed all the way through. You can see his go in. He went crazy."

Kent: "(Keaton) thought I was just joking around. It was pretty surreal. I don't know if that was a plus for him or if I took some of his limelight away. But I think it will be a more memorable thing when you have two of them, especially a father-son combination. It's pretty cool."

Keaton: "I was down there and heard him screaming. He said something like 'I did it too.' I thought he was playing a little joke, but then it seemed pretty legit. I wasn't 100 percent sure until I saw two balls in the hole, though."

Kent: "I had a joke with him. I told him for about two minutes you had the same number of career hole-in-ones as I did...I've doubled the number of hole-in-ones I've seen on that hole."

Keaton: "I tied him for 30 seconds, but I guess he had enough of that. He took the lead again."

Kent: "I had only done it once in my life, here I do it immediately after he does it, you know this is just freakish."

It's not particularly easy to keep focus after an occurrence like this unfolds. The rest of the round, the magnificence of the moment started to sink in.

Kent: "I cannot say the golf was brilliant after we were finished. We didn't really care too much what the score added up to once it was done."

Keaton: "Right after that I sent about four or five group texts about it. No one believed me. I posted on Facebook and everybody's commenting 'oh yeah right,' that sort of thing. I wouldn't believe anyone who told me it. Can't really blame them I guess."

Kalen: "I knew when it happened that the odds were very much stacked against us. But I didn't know exactly how ridiculous it was until my uncle Rusty being the math genius that he is came up with the million odds, then it kind of hit how rare that is."

Keaton: "Just crazy, and it's never going to happen again. Kind of surreal at first, but it kind of sunk in as the day went on and it didn't really matter what anybody shot. It was fun."

Debbie was glad her passion for photographing and videotaping her kids' big moments over the years led to capturing this moment. Plus, Kent played a Titleist 8. Keaton used a No. 1 ball. Kent was the eighth-born child while Keaton was the oldest of his siblings.

Debbie: "I have taken pictures since when Keaton (was born). I didn't really take too many (before), but when he was born I went kind of nuts you might say. I got into it then."

At the turn, news came into the clubhouse. Cottonwood Hills' Justin Alldritt said everyone was aghast. It was the perfect cherry on top to a pleasant first summer after reopening.

Alldritt: "That's when everyone in the clubhouse looked up and was like, 'woah, never heard of that happening before.' "

The staff relayed the news to course pro Matt Seitz, a friend of the Hilst's. He was giddy and off site.

Seitz: "I was just as happy can be for the family. I actually felt a little bad for Kalen because he was playing too and he got locked out. The poor guy just can't make a hole-in-one to keep up with his dad and big brother. It's a good golfing family, and I was just happy for them. It's good to see."

Years ago, two players in Hesston aced the same hole in a match. Playing a PGA Midwest Section tournament in Kansas City over a decade ago, Seitz, who's been a pro for over three decades, remembers two pros acing the same hole a group ahead of him. But a father and son on the same hole? This is something you don't see every decade.

Seitz: "As we all know, hole-in-ones, the odds are astronomical. Same group even more so and then you have a father-son do it on top of that, it's probably easier to get struck by lightning than to have that happen. As far as father-son happening on the same hole, I've never heard of that happening."

Keaton: "Last couple days I've tried to Google anywhere else it's happened before. I couldn't really find any. It's pretty nuts."

Seitz has five career aces. So does Rusty Hilst. Rusty, Kent's older brother, picked up his most recent on April 25th on No. 4 at Prairie Dunes. He had a 33-year lapse between aces. Rusty is a fixture in the Kansas golf community. He's seen and heard it all. But this was something new.

Rusty: "I'd say I've been involved in helping run golf tournaments for the Kansas Golf Association for 40 years. I've never seen two hole-in-ones in the same group. Yeah, this was certainly one of the rarest things I've ever seen or heard of. It's a fun occurrence."

This article was written by Tommy Dahlk from The Hutchinson News, Kan. and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Yokohama LPGA title goes to Tamulis

PRATTVILLE, Ala. (AP) — Kris Tamulis won the Yokohama Tire LPGA Classic on Sunday for her first LPGA Tour title.

Tamulis played 29 holes Sunday in the twice-delayed tournament, the 186th of her LPGA Tour career. She finished a third-round 67 and closed with a 65 to beat Yani Tseng and Austin Ernst by a stroke.

The 34-year-old former Florida State player had a 17-under 271 total on The Senator Course and didn't show the strain of being in contention with so little margin for error.

"It was amazing," Tamulis said. "I was definitely not expecting this today."

Tseng had rounds of 71 and 67, and Ernst shot 68-69 with the weather clearing up after delays totaling nearly 7 hours the previous two days. Both parred the final hole with a chance to force a playoff.

Tamulis birdied four of the first six holes in the final round before finally making her only bogey of the last three rounds. She hadn't finished better than fourth on the tour.

Tamulis was all smiles at the end. She made a short birdie putt on the 17th hole, cheerfully telling two fans "28 of 29 completed today." Then, a long birdie putt, hit seemingly perfectly on line, stopped inches shy of the final hole. Still smiling, she told her caddie the ball needed just "a little more oomph," then chatted with the teenager carrying the score placard.

She had about 45 minutes to sweat it out. Tseng and Ernst both had makeable birdie putts on 18, on opposite sides of the pin. Ernst's attempt went to the left. Tseng came closer, falling to her knees when her putt lipped out.

"When they both missed I was just shocked," said Tamulis, who chatted with volunteers and had a snack in air-conditioned comfort instead of watching or practicing for a possible playoff. A friend kept her updated.

Tamulis had been fourth last year in Prattville and earlier this year at the Meijer LPGA Classic. She didn't make the cut at last week's Canadian Pacific Women's Open after posting two 73 rounds. Her rounds steadily improved from 71 to 68 to 67 and finally 65.

It was her first win since Florida State but she had a pair of runners-up finishes in 2004 on the Symetra Tour.

Tamulis said she was trying to ignore the leaderboard, focusing instead on a countdown from 29 holes.

"The last time I actually saw where it was at was by accident on No. 9," she said. "Then I felt really good and I was just out there trying to have a good time. My goal was to come in here have a decent week, play well and secure my spots in Asia."

She also wanted to ensure she made the field in her hometown of Naples, Florida, for the season finale, the CME Group Tour Championship. Her expression matched the smiley face magnet affixed to her visor, given to her two years ago by an elderly scorekeeper in Phoenix.

Tseng is a 26-year-old Taiwanese player who ranked No. 1 for 109 weeks early in her career. She came close to snapping an 85-event winless streak dating to the 2012 Kia Classic, making a long birdie putt on No. 16.

This was Tseng's second runner-up finish of the year.

Ernst was seeking her second tour win. Sydnee Michaels finished with a 67, finishing in a fourth-place tie with 2011 winner Lexi Thompson. Thompson closed with a 69 and was in the 60s all four rounds.

This article was written by John Zenor from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

By
John Zenor

Series: LPGA Tour

Published: Sunday, August 30, 2015 | 11:25 p.m.

PRATTVILLE, Ala. (AP) — Kris Tamulis won the Yokohama Tire LPGA Classic on Sunday for her first LPGA Tour title.

Tamulis played 29 holes Sunday in the twice-delayed tournament, the 186th of her LPGA Tour career. She finished a third-round 67 and closed with a 65 to beat Yani Tseng and Austin Ernst by a stroke.

The 34-year-old former Florida State player had a 17-under 271 total on The Senator Course and didn't show the strain of being in contention with so little margin for error.

"It was amazing," Tamulis said. "I was definitely not expecting this today."

Tseng had rounds of 71 and 67, and Ernst shot 68-69 with the weather clearing up after delays totaling nearly 7 hours the previous two days. Both parred the final hole with a chance to force a playoff.

Tamulis birdied four of the first six holes in the final round before finally making her only bogey of the last three rounds. She hadn't finished better than fourth on the tour.

Tamulis was all smiles at the end. She made a short birdie putt on the 17th hole, cheerfully telling two fans "28 of 29 completed today." Then, a long birdie putt, hit seemingly perfectly on line, stopped inches shy of the final hole. Still smiling, she told her caddie the ball needed just "a little more oomph," then chatted with the teenager carrying the score placard.

She had about 45 minutes to sweat it out. Tseng and Ernst both had makeable birdie putts on 18, on opposite sides of the pin. Ernst's attempt went to the left. Tseng came closer, falling to her knees when her putt lipped out.

"When they both missed I was just shocked," said Tamulis, who chatted with volunteers and had a snack in air-conditioned comfort instead of watching or practicing for a possible playoff. A friend kept her updated.

Tamulis had been fourth last year in Prattville and earlier this year at the Meijer LPGA Classic. She didn't make the cut at last week's Canadian Pacific Women's Open after posting two 73 rounds. Her rounds steadily improved from 71 to 68 to 67 and finally 65.

It was her first win since Florida State but she had a pair of runners-up finishes in 2004 on the Symetra Tour.

Tamulis said she was trying to ignore the leaderboard, focusing instead on a countdown from 29 holes.

"The last time I actually saw where it was at was by accident on No. 9," she said. "Then I felt really good and I was just out there trying to have a good time. My goal was to come in here have a decent week, play well and secure my spots in Asia."

She also wanted to ensure she made the field in her hometown of Naples, Florida, for the season finale, the CME Group Tour Championship. Her expression matched the smiley face magnet affixed to her visor, given to her two years ago by an elderly scorekeeper in Phoenix.

Tseng is a 26-year-old Taiwanese player who ranked No. 1 for 109 weeks early in her career. She came close to snapping an 85-event winless streak dating to the 2012 Kia Classic, making a long birdie putt on No. 16.

This was Tseng's second runner-up finish of the year.

Ernst was seeking her second tour win. Sydnee Michaels finished with a 67, finishing in a fourth-place tie with 2011 winner Lexi Thompson. Thompson closed with a 69 and was in the 60s all four rounds.

This article was written by John Zenor from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Inkster wins The Legends Championship

FRENCH LICK, Ind. (AP) — U.S. Solheim Cup captain Juli Inkster won The Legends Championship on Sunday, finishing with a 4-under 68 for a two-stroke victory over Trish Johnson.

"If a 55-year-old can win, they can, too," Inkster said about her Solheim Cup team that will face Europe in Germany on Sept. 18-20. "This has been a tough year, and I'm really tired right now. I have an outing Tuesday in Detroit, then I'll be home for a week."

The Hall of Famer had a 5-under 139 total after opening with a 71 on French Lick Resort's Pete Dye Course.

"I wasn't playing very well on the front side, but I birdied 13, 15, 17 and 18," Inkster said. "That won the tournament for me. I stayed patient and started hitting it a lot better. I had no idea where I was in the tournament. I just tried to keep making birdies. It was good to win. I feel good."

The 31-time LPGA winner earned $37,500 for her first Legends Tour victory.

Johnson bogeyed the final hole for a 70.

Pat Hurst and Lorie Kane tied for third. Hurst had a 69, and Kane shot 70.

Jan Stephenson won the Super Legends competition for players 63 and older. The 63-year-old Australian shot a 71 for an eight-shot victory over Judy Dickinson. Stephenson finished at even-par 144.

"Winning can never get old," Stephenson said. "This was so much fun, and it was really emotional for me. It was for my mom. She passed away earlier in the month."


Series: Other Tour

Published: Sunday, August 30, 2015 | 11:09 p.m.

FRENCH LICK, Ind. (AP) — U.S. Solheim Cup captain Juli Inkster won The Legends Championship on Sunday, finishing with a 4-under 68 for a two-stroke victory over Trish Johnson.

"If a 55-year-old can win, they can, too," Inkster said about her Solheim Cup team that will face Europe in Germany on Sept. 18-20. "This has been a tough year, and I'm really tired right now. I have an outing Tuesday in Detroit, then I'll be home for a week."

The Hall of Famer had a 5-under 139 total after opening with a 71 on French Lick Resort's Pete Dye Course.

"I wasn't playing very well on the front side, but I birdied 13, 15, 17 and 18," Inkster said. "That won the tournament for me. I stayed patient and started hitting it a lot better. I had no idea where I was in the tournament. I just tried to keep making birdies. It was good to win. I feel good."

The 31-time LPGA winner earned $37,500 for her first Legends Tour victory.

Johnson bogeyed the final hole for a 70.

Pat Hurst and Lorie Kane tied for third. Hurst had a 69, and Kane shot 70.

Jan Stephenson won the Super Legends competition for players 63 and older. The 63-year-old Australian shot a 71 for an eight-shot victory over Judy Dickinson. Stephenson finished at even-par 144.

"Winning can never get old," Stephenson said. "This was so much fun, and it was really emotional for me. It was for my mom. She passed away earlier in the month."


Day fires 62, buries Barclays field

Jason Day
USA Today Sports Images
Jason Day shot a final-round 62 to win the Barclays by six strokes.

EDISON, N.J. (AP) — Jason Day powered and putted his way to another blowout against a world-class field Sunday at The Barclays.

Fresh off his first major at the PGA Championship, Day pulled away early and poured it on with three long birdie putts on the back nine at Plainfield. A birdie on the closing hole gave him an 8-under 62 for a six-shot victory over Henrik Stenson.

Day closed with a 63-62 weekend and finished at 19-under 261. He won two weeks ago by three shots over Jordan Spieth with a record to par at 20-under 268.

THE BARCLAYS: Results, scores | Sunday's photos

The victory moves the 27-year-old Australian to the top of the FedEx Cup after the opening playoff event, assuring that Day will be among the top five who have a clear shot at the $10 million bonus at the Tour Championship.

More compelling is another race for No. 1.

With his second straight victory, and fourth of the year, Day remains at No. 3 in the world but now enters the picture with Spieth and Rory McIlroy for golf supremacy. All three will have a mathematical chance to get to No. 1 at the Deutsche Bank Championship next week at the TPC Boston.

"It's been a special summer for me, and it's not over," Day said. "To be able to play the way I did over the weekend is fantastic. Today was just phenomenal golf."

Stenson gave it a good shot.

He made birdies on the 13th and 14th holes to get within two shots, and Day hit a tee shot well to the right in the trees in the group behind on No. 13. There was just enough of an opening for Day to pound a gap wedge over the trees and onto the green, and then he effectively ended the tournament.

ACE OF CLUBS: Brian Harman records two holes-in-one in same round

He holed a 30-foot birdie across the green on the par-3 14th, and rolled in a birdie from 35 feet on the 15th to stretch his lead to five shots.

Day is tied for Spieth with four wins on the PGA Tour this year, though two of those for Spieth were the Masters and U.S. Open.

Bae Sang-moon, tied with Day going into the final round, fell behind with a bogey on No. 3 and was in reverse for much of the day. He closed with a 72 and tied for sixth. Ryan Palmer, playing a week after his 71-year-old father died in a traffic accident in west Texas, closed with a 70 and tied for sixth. Palmer choked back tears when he finished.

Bubba Watson made two late birdies for a 69 to finish alone in third, though this was a two-man race over the final back nine.

It wasn't the only contest, though.

The top 100 in the FedEx Cup advance to the next playoff event at the TPC Boston. PGA Tour rookie Zac Blair was among eight players who played their way into the top 100, and he did it in a big way. He closed with a 66 and tied for fourth, moving him from No. 106 to No. 35.

Camilo Villegas at No. 123 appeared to be playing his way out of another week when he made three straight bogeys early on the back nine. Facing elimination if he failed to make par on the 18th, he got up-and-down by making a par putt from just inside 10 feet.

"As bad as I putted today, I think I made the hardest putt today," Villegas said.

MISS CUT? NO PROBLEM: Spieth, Fowler play practice round at Baltusrol

The Barclays did not end well for Stewart Cink and Nick Taylor. Cink needed a par on the final hole to advance, pulled his tee shot left into high grass and missed a 15-foot par putt for a 72. He finished at No. 102 in the FedEx Cup. Taylor, the Canadian rookie who won early in the season last November, took a double bogey on the 14th hole and then missed a 7-foot birdie putt on the final hole to move on to Boston.

Jason Kokrak, who missed the cut, finished one point ahead of Taylor as the last man to advance.

Day has no such worries. He is in free flight, even though his week began with some doubt. He was moving a box from under his motor home when he felt a twinge in his back, and Day pulled out of the pro-am to rest his back and have tests to check on the structural being of his back.

He still felt some pain on Thursday, but the heat helped over the weekend. And nothing was hotter than his putter. He began the back nine with a 30-foot birdie putt on No. 10 to keep his margin, and it never looked as though anyone else was going to win.

Day went six years with only one PGA Tour, and now they are starting to pile up. He was thrilled when he won the Canadian Open because it was his first multiple-win season on tour. Now he has four victories, and has never looked tougher to beat.

By
Doug Ferguson

Series: PGA Tour

Published: Sunday, August 30, 2015 | 11:04 p.m.

EDISON, N.J. (AP) — Jason Day powered and putted his way to another blowout against a world-class field Sunday at The Barclays.

Fresh off his first major at the PGA Championship, Day pulled away early and poured it on with three long birdie putts on the back nine at Plainfield. A birdie on the closing hole gave him an 8-under 62 for a six-shot victory over Henrik Stenson.

Day closed with a 63-62 weekend and finished at 19-under 261. He won two weeks ago by three shots over Jordan Spieth with a record to par at 20-under 268.

THE BARCLAYS: Results, scores | Sunday's photos

The victory moves the 27-year-old Australian to the top of the FedEx Cup after the opening playoff event, assuring that Day will be among the top five who have a clear shot at the $10 million bonus at the Tour Championship.

More compelling is another race for No. 1.

With his second straight victory, and fourth of the year, Day remains at No. 3 in the world but now enters the picture with Spieth and Rory McIlroy for golf supremacy. All three will have a mathematical chance to get to No. 1 at the Deutsche Bank Championship next week at the TPC Boston.

"It's been a special summer for me, and it's not over," Day said. "To be able to play the way I did over the weekend is fantastic. Today was just phenomenal golf."

Stenson gave it a good shot.

He made birdies on the 13th and 14th holes to get within two shots, and Day hit a tee shot well to the right in the trees in the group behind on No. 13. There was just enough of an opening for Day to pound a gap wedge over the trees and onto the green, and then he effectively ended the tournament.

ACE OF CLUBS: Brian Harman records two holes-in-one in same round

He holed a 30-foot birdie across the green on the par-3 14th, and rolled in a birdie from 35 feet on the 15th to stretch his lead to five shots.

Day is tied for Spieth with four wins on the PGA Tour this year, though two of those for Spieth were the Masters and U.S. Open.

Bae Sang-moon, tied with Day going into the final round, fell behind with a bogey on No. 3 and was in reverse for much of the day. He closed with a 72 and tied for sixth. Ryan Palmer, playing a week after his 71-year-old father died in a traffic accident in west Texas, closed with a 70 and tied for sixth. Palmer choked back tears when he finished.

Bubba Watson made two late birdies for a 69 to finish alone in third, though this was a two-man race over the final back nine.

It wasn't the only contest, though.

The top 100 in the FedEx Cup advance to the next playoff event at the TPC Boston. PGA Tour rookie Zac Blair was among eight players who played their way into the top 100, and he did it in a big way. He closed with a 66 and tied for fourth, moving him from No. 106 to No. 35.

Camilo Villegas at No. 123 appeared to be playing his way out of another week when he made three straight bogeys early on the back nine. Facing elimination if he failed to make par on the 18th, he got up-and-down by making a par putt from just inside 10 feet.

"As bad as I putted today, I think I made the hardest putt today," Villegas said.

MISS CUT? NO PROBLEM: Spieth, Fowler play practice round at Baltusrol

The Barclays did not end well for Stewart Cink and Nick Taylor. Cink needed a par on the final hole to advance, pulled his tee shot left into high grass and missed a 15-foot par putt for a 72. He finished at No. 102 in the FedEx Cup. Taylor, the Canadian rookie who won early in the season last November, took a double bogey on the 14th hole and then missed a 7-foot birdie putt on the final hole to move on to Boston.

Jason Kokrak, who missed the cut, finished one point ahead of Taylor as the last man to advance.

Day has no such worries. He is in free flight, even though his week began with some doubt. He was moving a box from under his motor home when he felt a twinge in his back, and Day pulled out of the pro-am to rest his back and have tests to check on the structural being of his back.

He still felt some pain on Thursday, but the heat helped over the weekend. And nothing was hotter than his putter. He began the back nine with a 30-foot birdie putt on No. 10 to keep his margin, and it never looked as though anyone else was going to win.

Day went six years with only one PGA Tour, and now they are starting to pile up. He was thrilled when he won the Canadian Open because it was his first multiple-win season on tour. Now he has four victories, and has never looked tougher to beat.


Maggert captures Dick's Sporting Goods Open

ENDICOTT, N.Y. (AP) — Jeff Maggert won the Dick's Sporting Goods Open on Sunday for his fourth Champions Tour victory of the year, closing with a 6-under 66 to beat Paul Goydos by two strokes.

Maggert took the lead in the Charles Schwab Cup standings, 119 points ahead of Colin Montgomerie. Montgomerie skipped the tournament because of commitments in Europe.

Maggert finished at 14-under 202 at En-Joie Golf Club. He won the Regions Tradition in May and the U.S. Senior Open in July, both major championships, and took the Shaw Charity Classic three weeks ago in Canada.

The Texan's second straight 68 on Saturday put him in good position for another win, and he took advantage in a big way with six birdies in a bogey-free round.

Goydos shot a 68. Corey Pavin (69), David Frost (64), Peter Senior (65), Jerry Smith (67) and Ian Woosnam (70) tied for third at 10 under.

Bernhard Langer, the winner last year and third in the Schwab Cup, failed to earn any points. He tied for 20th at 6 under after a 68.

The victory was worth $285,000 and boosted the 51-year-old Maggert's earnings for the year to $2,094,976.

Second-round leader Rod Spittle (74) of Canada, bidding for his second career victory, couldn't keep the magic going that had placed him atop the leaderboard after rounds of 68 and 66.

Fifty-year-old Scott McCarron (75), who had a 64 on the second round and was tied for second with John Huston to start the day, faltered in his fourth Champions Tour event. He made only two birdies and a triple-bogey 7 at the 15th hole put a damper on his day.

As usual, the ninth edition of this tournament came down to the closing holes. Trailing by one shot on a warm, humid afternoon, Goydos hit his tee shot into the large water hazard that lines the left side of the fairway at the difficult par-4 15th hole and had to take a penalty as Maggert paused to watch.

Goydos recovered to make bogey and lose just one shot, then missed a birdie putt inside 8 feet at No. 16 after driving over a cart path to the right of the green.

Pavin tied Goydos at 12 under with a brilliant pitch for birdie from off the fringe at the par-3 17th. Moments later, the smile on Pavin's face disappeared when he hit his tee shot into the water hazard at No. 18. He then walked the fairway with head down, frustrated at a lost opportunity.

Maggert stayed out of trouble over the final three holes and was home-free when Goydos missed a birdie putt at No. 18.

Huston, the winner here four years ago, was at 10 under heading to the par-3 seventh but took himself out of contention to become the tournament's first repeat champion with a triple bogey. He mishit his drive, the shot nearly landing in the imposing water hazard that guards the right side, had to take a penalty, and couldn't recover when his next shot landed in a greenside bunker.

Maggert, two shots behind Spittle at the start of play, birdied the first three holes to reach 11 under and added two more before the turn. He chipped to a foot at the par-5 eighth hole and rolled in a 10-foot putt at No. 9.

The surge continued at No. 10 when Maggert rolled in a 40-foot putt to reach 14 under, two shots clear of Goydos.

Goydos, who began the day tied for fourth with Maggert, Woosnam and Stephen Ames, also started with a flurry of five birdies on the front side, but he, too, faltered at No. 7, making bogey. A birdie at the par-5 12th had Goydos back within one of the lead at 13 under.

By
John Kekis

Series: Champions Tour

Published: Sunday, August 30, 2015 | 10:11 p.m.

ENDICOTT, N.Y. (AP) — Jeff Maggert won the Dick's Sporting Goods Open on Sunday for his fourth Champions Tour victory of the year, closing with a 6-under 66 to beat Paul Goydos by two strokes.

Maggert took the lead in the Charles Schwab Cup standings, 119 points ahead of Colin Montgomerie. Montgomerie skipped the tournament because of commitments in Europe.

Maggert finished at 14-under 202 at En-Joie Golf Club. He won the Regions Tradition in May and the U.S. Senior Open in July, both major championships, and took the Shaw Charity Classic three weeks ago in Canada.

The Texan's second straight 68 on Saturday put him in good position for another win, and he took advantage in a big way with six birdies in a bogey-free round.

Goydos shot a 68. Corey Pavin (69), David Frost (64), Peter Senior (65), Jerry Smith (67) and Ian Woosnam (70) tied for third at 10 under.

Bernhard Langer, the winner last year and third in the Schwab Cup, failed to earn any points. He tied for 20th at 6 under after a 68.

The victory was worth $285,000 and boosted the 51-year-old Maggert's earnings for the year to $2,094,976.

Second-round leader Rod Spittle (74) of Canada, bidding for his second career victory, couldn't keep the magic going that had placed him atop the leaderboard after rounds of 68 and 66.

Fifty-year-old Scott McCarron (75), who had a 64 on the second round and was tied for second with John Huston to start the day, faltered in his fourth Champions Tour event. He made only two birdies and a triple-bogey 7 at the 15th hole put a damper on his day.

As usual, the ninth edition of this tournament came down to the closing holes. Trailing by one shot on a warm, humid afternoon, Goydos hit his tee shot into the large water hazard that lines the left side of the fairway at the difficult par-4 15th hole and had to take a penalty as Maggert paused to watch.

Goydos recovered to make bogey and lose just one shot, then missed a birdie putt inside 8 feet at No. 16 after driving over a cart path to the right of the green.

Pavin tied Goydos at 12 under with a brilliant pitch for birdie from off the fringe at the par-3 17th. Moments later, the smile on Pavin's face disappeared when he hit his tee shot into the water hazard at No. 18. He then walked the fairway with head down, frustrated at a lost opportunity.

Maggert stayed out of trouble over the final three holes and was home-free when Goydos missed a birdie putt at No. 18.

Huston, the winner here four years ago, was at 10 under heading to the par-3 seventh but took himself out of contention to become the tournament's first repeat champion with a triple bogey. He mishit his drive, the shot nearly landing in the imposing water hazard that guards the right side, had to take a penalty, and couldn't recover when his next shot landed in a greenside bunker.

Maggert, two shots behind Spittle at the start of play, birdied the first three holes to reach 11 under and added two more before the turn. He chipped to a foot at the par-5 eighth hole and rolled in a 10-foot putt at No. 9.

The surge continued at No. 10 when Maggert rolled in a 40-foot putt to reach 14 under, two shots clear of Goydos.

Goydos, who began the day tied for fourth with Maggert, Woosnam and Stephen Ames, also started with a flurry of five birdies on the front side, but he, too, faltered at No. 7, making bogey. A birdie at the par-5 12th had Goydos back within one of the lead at 13 under.


Agent: Daly had collapsed lung

John Daly
USA Today Sports Images
1991 PGA Champion John Daly was taken to the hospital Saturday after collapsing during a round of golf.

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — John Daly was out of the hospital and playing golf again Sunday less than 24 hours after he was stricken on the course with what he says was a collapsed lung.

The two-time major champion was taken by ambulance to Baptist Medical Center on Saturday after he collapsed on the 18th tee during an outing at Deerfield Country Club. Daly said doctors ran tests and X-rays but found no other serious problems besides the lung.

"I was having a great time and then suddenly -- boom -- I'm falling down while on the 18th tee and the next thing I know I'm in an ambulance," Daly said. "It was scary."

But Daly was back at Deerfield on Sunday, smoking cigarettes on the clubhouse patio while mingling with some of the other players before his round. The tournament is a small, local gathering that includes some of Daly's friends.

Daly's agent, Bud Martin, said in an email earlier Saturday that the 49-year-old golfer has been coping with a lingering rib injury dating to 2007. The injury recently was causing pain and affected his breathing.

Daly's right hand was heavily taped on Sunday. He said he hurt it while putting a new tire on his son's golf cart earlier this week, which indirectly led to Saturday's problems.

"I had to change my swing some to get a good grip and the doctor said the changed motion is likely what led to the collapsed lung," Daly said.

Deerfield club pro Leigh Brannan says Daly was having trouble with the heat Saturday and had difficulty breathing before being taken to the hospital. Temperatures were near 90 degrees.

"It was just kind of a freak injury," Daly said.

Daly's hard-living ways have been well documented during a turbulent career on the PGA Tour. He recently threw his 6-iron into Lake Michigan during the PGA Championship after hitting three balls into the water.

This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Series: PGA Tour

Published: Sunday, August 30, 2015 | 5:36 p.m.

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — John Daly was out of the hospital and playing golf again Sunday less than 24 hours after he was stricken on the course with what he says was a collapsed lung.

The two-time major champion was taken by ambulance to Baptist Medical Center on Saturday after he collapsed on the 18th tee during an outing at Deerfield Country Club. Daly said doctors ran tests and X-rays but found no other serious problems besides the lung.

"I was having a great time and then suddenly -- boom -- I'm falling down while on the 18th tee and the next thing I know I'm in an ambulance," Daly said. "It was scary."

But Daly was back at Deerfield on Sunday, smoking cigarettes on the clubhouse patio while mingling with some of the other players before his round. The tournament is a small, local gathering that includes some of Daly's friends.

Daly's agent, Bud Martin, said in an email earlier Saturday that the 49-year-old golfer has been coping with a lingering rib injury dating to 2007. The injury recently was causing pain and affected his breathing.

Daly's right hand was heavily taped on Sunday. He said he hurt it while putting a new tire on his son's golf cart earlier this week, which indirectly led to Saturday's problems.

"I had to change my swing some to get a good grip and the doctor said the changed motion is likely what led to the collapsed lung," Daly said.

Deerfield club pro Leigh Brannan says Daly was having trouble with the heat Saturday and had difficulty breathing before being taken to the hospital. Temperatures were near 90 degrees.

"It was just kind of a freak injury," Daly said.

Daly's hard-living ways have been well documented during a turbulent career on the PGA Tour. He recently threw his 6-iron into Lake Michigan during the PGA Championship after hitting three balls into the water.

This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Pieters wins Czech Masters for 1st European Tour victory

VYSOKY UJEZD, Czech Republic -- Thomas Pieters shot a 3-under 69 on Sunday to win the Czech Masters by three strokes for his first European Tour victory.

Pieters overcame a bad start with a double bogey on the third hole by making four birdies the rest of the way to hold off Pelle Edberg of Sweden. The 23-year-old Belgian finished with a 20-under 268 at the Albatross Golf course near Prague.

"To be a European Tour winner it's an amazing feeling right now,"Pieters said. "Right now it means everything, you work for it all year long, up till now my whole life. I played really well after making an early double."

Edberg shot a 71 after mixing three birdies with two bogeys, with Matthew Fitzpatrick of England another shot back after a 68.

Edberg opened the final round with two straight birdies to surge into the lead before his hopes for a first European Tour win suffered a blow with a bogey on the 3rd and another on the 11th.

"Overall, I'm pleased," ''Edberg said. "This is a step in the right direction."

This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Series: European Tour

Published: Sunday, August 30, 2015 | 4:27 p.m.

VYSOKY UJEZD, Czech Republic -- Thomas Pieters shot a 3-under 69 on Sunday to win the Czech Masters by three strokes for his first European Tour victory.

Pieters overcame a bad start with a double bogey on the third hole by making four birdies the rest of the way to hold off Pelle Edberg of Sweden. The 23-year-old Belgian finished with a 20-under 268 at the Albatross Golf course near Prague.

"To be a European Tour winner it's an amazing feeling right now,"Pieters said. "Right now it means everything, you work for it all year long, up till now my whole life. I played really well after making an early double."

Edberg shot a 71 after mixing three birdies with two bogeys, with Matthew Fitzpatrick of England another shot back after a 68.

Edberg opened the final round with two straight birdies to surge into the lead before his hopes for a first European Tour win suffered a blow with a bogey on the 3rd and another on the 11th.

"Overall, I'm pleased," ''Edberg said. "This is a step in the right direction."

This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Trio leads crowd atop Legends leaderboard

Julie Inkster
USA Today Sports Images
Julie Inkster, who will lead the U.S. Women's Solheim Cup Team, is at the top of the leaderbaord of The Legends Championship.

FRENCH LICK, Ind. -- U.S. Solheim Cup captain Juli Inkster, Laura Davies and Trish Johnson are tied for the lead with 71s in the first round of The Legends Championship at French Lick Resort on Saturday.

That trio holds a slim one shot lead over five others: Wendy Doolan, Christa Johnson, Maggie Will, Rosie Jones and Lorie Kane, all at par 72.

With threatening weather in the forecast for today, play is scheduled to begin off both the Nos. 1 and 10 tees at 8 a.m., in order to finish by around 3 p.m.

Defending champion Laurie Rinker is four shots back in a tie for 19th place but watch out. Last year she produced a 66 under a similar set of circumstances at the Pete Dye Course.

"If someone (among the first-round leaders) can go out and shoot 66 or 67, that would be hard to beat," said Davies.

Jones was coming off an emotional induction ceremony for The Legends Hall of Fame the night before.

"I was more worried about my speech than my putting before this week," she said. "Now that that's over I can concentrate on what happens on the golf course."

Though she's tied for the lead, Inkster called her first round, "very sloppy."

"The speed on my putting wasn't very good," she said. "I've got to clean that up before tomorrow."

The tournament for Super Legends, players 63 and older, isn't quite as top-heavy on the leaderboard. Jan Stephenson, playing her first event as a Super Legend, shot a solid 73 to take a two-stroke lead over Judy Dickinson.


Series: LPGA Tour

Published: Sunday, August 30, 2015 | 8:41 a.m.

FRENCH LICK, Ind. -- U.S. Solheim Cup captain Juli Inkster, Laura Davies and Trish Johnson are tied for the lead with 71s in the first round of The Legends Championship at French Lick Resort on Saturday.

That trio holds a slim one shot lead over five others: Wendy Doolan, Christa Johnson, Maggie Will, Rosie Jones and Lorie Kane, all at par 72.

With threatening weather in the forecast for today, play is scheduled to begin off both the Nos. 1 and 10 tees at 8 a.m., in order to finish by around 3 p.m.

Defending champion Laurie Rinker is four shots back in a tie for 19th place but watch out. Last year she produced a 66 under a similar set of circumstances at the Pete Dye Course.

"If someone (among the first-round leaders) can go out and shoot 66 or 67, that would be hard to beat," said Davies.

Jones was coming off an emotional induction ceremony for The Legends Hall of Fame the night before.

"I was more worried about my speech than my putting before this week," she said. "Now that that's over I can concentrate on what happens on the golf course."

Though she's tied for the lead, Inkster called her first round, "very sloppy."

"The speed on my putting wasn't very good," she said. "I've got to clean that up before tomorrow."

The tournament for Super Legends, players 63 and older, isn't quite as top-heavy on the leaderboard. Jan Stephenson, playing her first event as a Super Legend, shot a solid 73 to take a two-stroke lead over Judy Dickinson.


John Daly collapses, hospitalized

John Daly
USA Today Sports Images
John Daly was taken by ambulance to a Jackson, Miss., area hospital Saturday evening.

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — John Daly collapsed near the end of a round of golf Saturday and was taken by ambulance to a hospital.

The 49-year-old Daly was playing in a small, local tournament at Deerfield Golf Club in Jackson's northern suburbs.

Daly's friend, Billy Allen, who was with Daly at the hospital, said the two-time major champion's vital signs were good but doctors were checking on possible injuries to his ribs and fingers.

SWING SMARTER, NOT HARDER: John Daly's swing analyzed

Deerfield club pro Leigh Brannan, who was at the tournament, said Daly was having trouble with the heat and had some difficulty breathing before being taken to the hospital. Temperatures were near 90 degrees in the Jackson area.

This article was written by David Brandt from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

By
David Brandt

Series: PGA Tour

Published: Sunday, August 30, 2015 | 2:44 a.m.

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — John Daly collapsed near the end of a round of golf Saturday and was taken by ambulance to a hospital.

The 49-year-old Daly was playing in a small, local tournament at Deerfield Golf Club in Jackson's northern suburbs.

Daly's friend, Billy Allen, who was with Daly at the hospital, said the two-time major champion's vital signs were good but doctors were checking on possible injuries to his ribs and fingers.

SWING SMARTER, NOT HARDER: John Daly's swing analyzed

Deerfield club pro Leigh Brannan, who was at the tournament, said Daly was having trouble with the heat and had some difficulty breathing before being taken to the hospital. Temperatures were near 90 degrees in the Jackson area.

This article was written by David Brandt from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


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