Gary Player course on schedule in South Carolina

Cliffs at Mountain Park
Courtesy of The Cliffs
The new Cliffs at Mountain Park course is set in a wooded valley surrounded by mountains and split by the Saluda River.
PGA.com

Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Friday, August 31, 2012 | 7:29 p.m.

Here’s a sentence you don't read much these days: The construction of a high-profile golf course in the United States is progressing on schedule.

Gary Player Design is planning to open The Cliffs at Mountain Park Golf Course in the fall of 2013. One of only a handful of courses currently being built in North America, The Cliffs at Mountain Park is the seventh golf course in The Cliffs, a huge golf community in the Blue Ridge Mountains of western South Carolina.

Player Design expects the grassing of Mountain Park to be complete over the next several weeks. The course is part of the 5,000-acre Mountain Park residential community.

Surrounded by more than a million acres of state parks and national forests, the new course is set in a wooded valley surrounded by mountains and split by the Saluda River. The layout was carefully routed to preserve the site’s natural beauty and allow native flora, fauna, trees and grasses to flourish and cuts down on operating and maintenance costs by using organic materials and implementing eco-friendly design practices.

“In designing the Mountain Park Golf Course, we paid close attention to making the fairways firmer, not use as much water, not use as much fertilizer and take full advantage of the natural characteristics of the land,” said Gary Player Design President Scott Ferrell. “The setting is extraordinary and will prove to be a perfect showcase of our most recent design work.”

The Player organization has a special interest in this course – its Black Knight International global headquarters are adjacent to the course, which also borders the Gary Player Estates enclave and the Player Residence, an 8,000-square-foot home outfitted with artifacts, fabrics, furniture, light fixtures, reclaimed wood and rugs from various parts of Africa.

PGA.com