Equipment

Jack Nicklaus golf balls
Courtesy of Nicklaus Golf
Last fall, Jack Nicklaus came up with a clever twist on your basic golf ball – he came up with three models, designed to make them easy for golfers of all skill levels to know which one was most suited to their game.
 
A year later, the Golden Bear is at it again. On Monday, Nicklaus unveiled a new subscription service in which golfers can sign up to receive a dozen balls delivered directly to their home.
 
Even better, subscribers get a discount off the balls' retail price, and a percentage of their payment goes to children's charities. Since the balls were introduced, Nicklaus has donated a minimum of $1 per dozen sold on Nicklaus.com to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the Nicklaus Children's Health Care Foundation. 
 
In addition, subscribers will be able to make their own voluntary charitable contribution. To date, Nicklaus said, nearly 80 percent of golf ball buyers have chosen to do so.
 
VIDEO SWING COMPARISON: Jack Nicklaus vs. Bubba Watson 
 
"We wanted to make it easy for our devoted customers to receive product year-round, without having to visit the website or pro shop every time they needed golf balls," said Howard Milstein, co-chairman of the Nicklaus Companies. "By simplifying the process, we've introduced yet another innovation alongside our unique commitment to offering the highest quality golf balls at unmatched prices and helping to support pediatric charities."
 
The Nicklaus balls come in three versions – Black, Blue and White – and golfers make their choice according to the color of the tee markers from which they usually hit. Based on the premise that swing speeds can be accurately estimated by knowing the tees golfers regularly use, Nicklaus designed each model to help players who swing within specific speed ranges.
 
The balls are made in the United States, and sold online and golf shops at more than 200 domestic Nicklaus Design courses. They retail for $28 to $32 per dozen. You can check out the subscription service by clicking here and looking at any of the three balls for sale.
 
Nicklaus launches monthly golf ball subscription program
October 29, 2014 - 7:00am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Rukket
Rukket
Clockwise from top left: The RukkNet Portable Driving Range, Chipping Target, Monster Cage and Range Marker.

I love to work on my golf game. A certified golf junkie, that's me.

The problem these days is finding the time to get to the driving range, let alone the course for a round.

I'm a new parent, which is incredible, and I don't want to take all that time away from home to go to the range or the course. But, I still want to work on my game.

I've tried out a bunch of golf nets from golf stores, but they don't cut the mustard. They're flimsy, a pain to set up and if the wind blows, so too will that net.

Recently, I had the opportunity to try out three products from Rukket Sports: The RukkNet Portable Driving Range, Range Marker & Chipping Target and, the ultimate, Rukket Monster Cage.

Here's a breakdown of my experience with each...

The RukkNet Portable Driving Range

I was really a big fan of how the RukkNet Portable Driving Range is so compact in its packaging. It literally folds up into a perfect circle, into a carry bag that makes it easy to bring anywhere.

And the best part? There's very little set up time. You simply unzip the carry bag, pull out the net, and it pops out like a jack-in-a-box. Hammer down a couple of stakes just to keep it steady and you're ready to let some shots rip.

The net itself is high quality, too. You don't need to worry about hitting driver and sending a golf ball through the net into an unsuspecting neighbor's window.

This could be the most practical net on the market today. It doesn't require a ton of space to set up, you can take it with you to a friend's house and -- perhaps most importantly -- it takes up less storage space than one of grandma's folded quilts. Heck, if you have the room, you can even easily set if up indoors.

Like anything new, it took some getting used to folding the net into the carrying case, but once you practice a couple of times, it's a breeze.

The RukkNet Portable Driving Range sells for $219.99.

Rukket Range Marker & Chipping Target

The ease of use on the Range Marker & Chipping Target -- much like the Portable Driving Range -- is impressive. It just pops open, you hammer a couple of stakes down and you're ready to go.

For any golfer this is a great practice companion, because it really forces you to focus on the target. I spent most of my time working with the chipping target, going as far back as 25 yards. From there, I worked on shots with all my wedges, attempting to envision which of the three holes I wanted to hit and then trying to hit it there.

Of course, I didn't hit the target I intended every time, but over the course of about 15 minutes, my misses were much closer to my intended target.

And, if I'm being honest, the net wasn't used for just practice, but also for fun. My brother has come by for a couple of visits strictly to square off against one another in chipping contests.

I also found the Range Marker to be useful. Instead of pacing off a yardage, I used my rangefinder to lock in the marker at 50 yards. It really helped to develop a feel and consistency. I tried a variety of shots with different clubs, trying to hit the marker on the fly and one-bouncing it to the marker.

I'm not sure I'll use the marker part of this tool as much as the chipping target, but for those with a bigger yard, it could certainly be useful in essentially setting up your own personal backyard, short-iron driving range (the yardage "flaps" go up to 150 yards).

The Rukket Range Marker & Chipping Target costs $43.99.

Rukket Monster Cage

Last, but not least, the mother of all golf nets -- the Rukket Monster Cage.

I'm not going to lie -- this thing was not easy to put together. It took two of us (not very handy guys, mind you) roughly 1 hour and 30 minutes to get the job done. The assembly video on Rukket.com was helpful, but we both laughed at the video when the narrator suggested it would take two people about 20 minutes.

Basically, there are just a lot of pieces. Two things about that, which I realized not long after we got it assembled though: 1. There's a reason for all the pieces; 2.This isn't the type of net you're going to keep putting up and taking down. This is a heavy, heavy duty net. So, yes, it may take longer than the estimated 20 minutes to set up (or, maybe not for you), but once it's up, it's got that "wow" factor. I mean, really.

My advice would be to set it up exactly where you want it to be located. It's certainly moveable with just two people, but it's a little awkward because of the size.

OK, now let's talk about performance after we got it set up.

In a word: unreal.

Just like its name suggests, this net is, in fact, a "monster." Like Rukket's other products I tested, the net was such high quality that there wasn't a single worry about letting a driver rip.

What also separated the Monster Cage from other nets I've tried is that it's an actual cage. There's a "ceiling" net and three "wall" nets (right, left and center). It's pretty much mishit-proof (well, you can still mishit, but it won't cause unwanted damage) to something in your yard, neighbor's yard, or house).

It's also built to last. It's the kind of net you'd expect to see in a simulator, pro shop or trade-show booth. The frame is made from three-part steel tube construction with nickel-plated fasteners and the powder-coated frame ensures long-term outdoor use. The frame tubes and corners have extended ends for greater stability and the corners have PVC base plates that won't scratch floors if you're lucky enough to be able to assemble this indoors.

While I'll get plenty of golf use out of the Monster Cage, I also love the fact that it's so much more than a golf net. The quality and sturdiness, make it perfect for a growing family like mine that will be able to kick soccer balls, hit baseballs and softballs, throw footballs, or whatever else, right in the comfort of the backyard. It's an all-sports cage.

With a price tag of $599.99, it's certainly not cheap. But trust me, you get what you pay for. This is a net for the long haul. When you think of all the money you spend on golf balls at the driving range over the course of a year (if you're a serious golfer), or the money you spend for your kids to go to the batting cages, you quickly realize that having the luxury to do both in your own backyard has the Monster Cage paying for itself in no time.

To learn more about Rukket's offerings, visit www.rukket.com

Rukket provides driving range experience right at home
Adams Golf Idea Tech Hybrid Iron set
Courtesy of Adams Golf
The Adams Idea Tech Hybrid Iron set is designed for players with swing speeds of 85 mph or less.
Golfers with slower swing speeds often struggle to get the most out of high-performance clubs that perform better when swung faster – especially long irons. The Idea Tech Hybrid Iron set from Adams Golf, however, is designed specifically for golfers with slower swing speeds (85 mph and lower) who want to launch the ball high and achieve greater distance than they can manage with traditional irons. 
 
There are different sets:
 
--Men's: 3-5 Hybrid, 6-7 Driving Hybrid and 8-pitching wedge Hybrid Irons  
--Senior: 4-6 Hybrids, 7-8 Driving Hybrids and 9-gap wedge Hybrid Irons
--Women's: 4-6 Hybrids, 7-8 Driving Hybrids and and 9-sand wedge Hybrid Irons
 
"From the highest lofted iron to the lowest lofted hybrid, each club in the new Idea Tech hybrid iron set is intended to enhance the golfer's enjoyment of the game," said Michael Fox, director of product category management at Adams Golf. "This set was specifically made for the golfer who doesn't generate a lot of speed, but wants to experience the thrill of hitting high and straight launching golf shots."
 
By adding an external 24-gram weight to the back of the 3-5 hybrids, engineers could position the center of gravity lower and further back in the head than in any previous Adams hybrid. This low-and-back design gives slower swing-speed players higher launch and increased spin, helping them keep the ball airborne longer.
 
 
As in the previous generation, the Hybrid Irons (6-pitching wedge) feature an enhanced wrap-around slot that stretches from the toe across the sole and into the crown. This expands the sweet spot across the entire face, delivering better performance on off-center strikes. 
 
In addition, a refined barbell-shaped slot on the crown reduces stress on the face while improving ball speed. This, Adams says, results in the fastest and longest Idea hybrid and iron combination in the company's history.
 
The set also features a new progressive shaft design in which the shaft tip diameters get thinner towards the lower end of the set. This makes it easier to generate speed and launch on the downswing, making it ideal for slow swing speed players. 
 
The men's set carries a suggest retail price of $799.99 with steel shafts and $899.99 with graphite shafts. Both the women's and senior sets retail for $899.99 with graphite shafts, and all will be available at retail on Oct. 24.
 
Adams Golf unveils new Idea Tech Hybrid Iron set for slower swinging players
October 21, 2014 - 7:00am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Back 9 USA
Back 9 USA
Head covers, socks, hats and sweatshirts are just some of Back 9 USA's offerings.

Believe it or not, there was a time when golf wasn't considered cool.

An old man's game, some may have argued.

These days, however, it couldn't be further from that. Sure, there are personalities to thank for golf's coolness factor -- guys like Tiger Woods, who brought the game to the masses; Rickie Fowler, who has a cult following; Rory McIlroy, the world's No. 1 player and a four-time major champion at the age of just 25; and, of course, Fred Couples -- the King of Cool -- who came before all the aforementioned.

Apparel and accessory companies have also come a long way toward creating that "cool" golf vibe, extending their respective offerings to stuff you can wear off the course, while paying homage to the game you love, essentially making it so your love of golf is an entire lifestyle -- not just restricted to the fairways (OK, the rough, woods and bunkers for many of us).

RELATED: Custom accessories from Appalachian Leather Works | MannKrafted Milled Putters

One such company in this very space is Back 9 USA. Co-founded by Andy Hydorn, Back 9 USA's Chief Brand Officer, the company that started just outside Boston in 1996 now calls Houston home.

Back 9 USA got itself on the map -- initially -- with its headwear and its logo, which is brilliant in its meaning and simplicity. It's a backwards No. 9, indicative of playing the "back nine" on the golf course.

Over the years, Back 9 USA has expanded into so much more than that neat little company from Boston that makes the cool hats. The brand has morphed into an entire golf lifestyle brand.

It's not just lids for Back 9 USA anymore. Though you can still find those too, Back 9 USA also offers polos, fun t-shirts with witty golf-related phrases, sports socks, golf towels, custom headcovers and more.

Back 9 USA is Hydorn's dream coming to fruition -- he's cracked the code on creating his very own golf lifestyle and bringing it to the masses.

We sat down with Hydorn recently to learn more about his brand.

PGA.com: Back 9 USA started out as a golf headwear company. Over the last several years, you've transformed into so much more. It's not just hats anymore -- it's an entire golf lifestyle. Can you tell us about the transition?

Hydorn: Well, when we first got into the business, we had a great resource at Twins Enterprise in Boston (now 47 Brand). They were and still are, in my opinion, the best casual headwear makers in the country. They taught us a lot about the headwear business by observation alone and because of this relationship, we decided it was a natural that hats would be a great way to promote our new brand.

As time went by, the reaction to our logo and brand was consistently positive and it always begged an inquiry. That’s when we started to see that the correct way to build this company would be around the brand and not around a particular product category. We agreed then and there that if we could make a great product that we could design internally and brand it appropriately, the product category didn’t matter. We also realized that golfers have lives before the first tee and after the 18th green and making products for the lifestyle of the people who play golf as opposed to just “on the course” stuff just made more sense to us. Golfers are people too!

PGA.com: Tell us about your plethora of new offerings.

Hydorn: We like to look at what is going on in the rest of the retail world and not just in golf. It’s pretty easy to see what ‘s relevant if you remove your eyes from the golf course.

T-shirts and socks are great examples of that. The T-shirt has transformed greatly over the last several years into a more fashionable item. The fit is better and the fabrics are better. The tee has transcended into a whole new category. Socks are another great example of product evolution.

If you take a look around, the crew sock has made a huge comeback. Like any other comeback, it has its new wrinkles of color and style. We certainly saw this a year ago and wanted to be out front on a new golf crew sock as well as some colored ankle socks we saw lacking in the market. We’ll continue to look for opportunities this way. Things like golf bags, luggage, and an expanded line of apparel are always being closely looked at.

PGA.com: Let's talk a little about the logo. People love it. It seems like such a simple idea, but you're the only one who thought enough to create it! What made you think of the backwards nine?

Hydorn: Sometimes the most impactful things are right in front of your face the whole time. Iconic logos are tough to come by; we get that. We were lucky enough to take a really golf-centric term and pair it with the very simple process of turning a regular 9 into a backwards 9. The greatest thing about the mark is that it’s ours. It’s not a 9 or another number or a letter even. It’s a mark that was not known before it popped onto a notepad on my nightstand. It’s literal too, which makes it kind of cool. Truth be told, we had some pretty terrible ones on that same notepad but this one was different from the rest. The logo brings questions almost every time we’re in public. That’s a cool thing.

PGA.com: What's it like to see people wearing your gear?

Hydorn: It’s surreal. Knowing that you’ve created something from nothing and seeing it on complete strangers is a feeling that every entrepreneur should experience.

PGA.com: What was it that made you realize there was a need/want for golf lifestyle gear for people to take off the course?

Hydorn: For example, we saw the T-shirt category become a real component of people’s wardrobes, especially people in our target demographic group. As I said before, golfers are people too and we think they would prefer to wear a T-shirt that could tie them to golf as opposed to a guy in Iowa buying a tee from a surf brand.

Until recently though, the only cool T-shirts you could get were mostly from surf or skate brands. Well, not everyone desires or identifies with that culture. We have our own culture.

PGA.com: It seems as though custom golf head covers are sprouting up everywhere these last few years. What separates Back 9's from the others?

Hydorn: We are a design company. We saw a nice opening in the head cover market a few years ago. We felt like people were starting to tire of the manufacturers “give away” covers and wanted to dress their bag up a little more. We saw the emergence of the boutique head cover companies that were out there making really nice product, but manufacturing them one by one and bringing them to market for $50-$60.

First, we made a design upgrade by adding a stretch fabric panel on each side of the cover which made the footprint in the bag a little smaller and allowed us to embroider a completed head cover.

Second, we sourced a great fabric and manufacturing relationship that allowed us to bring the head covers to market for around $30. We also established some domestic production and partnered with the Woolrich Woolen Mill to make some really unique “Made-in-USA” wool slip on covers to go along with our engineered leather slip on covers. We feel like the price and value of our covers is really an advantage for us.

PGA.com: You've been involved in golf for many, many years -- both as a competitive amateur player and in the business. Can you ever remember it having as much of a "coolness" vibe as it has now?

Hydorn: No I can’t really. There are some really cool new brands out there now who are doing some great things and the iconic golf brands still are like royalty in the golf community. Golf is a younger game and I think the new stars are attracting a great new crop of aspiring players. Tiger, Rory, Rickie, and more have certainly done a lot to help our game in that respect. The brands are making cooler products now too; not just for the kids but for the adults also.

PGA.com: What's your favorite Back 9 item?

Hydorn: My favorite is whichever product I am working on now!

PGA.com: One of your more unique offerings is what's available to your customers in "The Lounge" on your website. Can you tell our readers about it?

Hydorn: Ah… “The Lounge.” It’s something I’m very proud of. We saw other industries doing some cool things in regards to personal customization and we thought that head covers would be the perfect product for us to offer this feature.

Today’s consumer is definitely more into personal design and we wanted to make this available to our customers on their head covers. We have a full menu of icons to pick from like the shamrock and skull and bones designs. The customer can then add a monogram or personal message to finish the design.

We also use the Lounge for our collegiate licenses. Some schools have a multitude of logos and we decided to let our customer tell us how they wanted to show their school pride instead of us guessing what they wanted. There are a ton of options and the Lounge just allows our customer to have more things to choose from.

PGA.com: Back 9 provided headcovers for the U.S. and European Solheim Cup teams in the 2011 matches. That had to be a neat experience for you.

Hydorn: That is that “surreal” feeling again. A few years back we had done some head covers for Callaway and Beth Daniel got her hands on one. She was the incoming captain for the 2009 Solheim Cup and we’ve been doing them ever since. It’s truly a sense of satisfaction when you see your head cover being ripped off a driver by Michelle Wie in an international competition.

PGA.com: The golf industry can be tough for small companies. How have you been able to not only stick around so long, but also expand your brand?

Hydorn: That hasn’t been easy by any stretch. I wish we had more resources but I’m sure everyone wishes for the same. We understand the importance of building the awareness of our brand and everything we do is focused on just that. We’re still so small and still relatively unknown to the masses but we do take pride in knowing that the "golf moles" know who we are and like what we do.

That’s the assurance we need to keep our eyes focused on the right things. We also believe that the struggles in the golf industry are real but a bit overstated. We don’t feel as if people “like” golf any less than before but just find it harder to play as much as before. Golf has become more accessible to more people and definitely has that cooler vibe you alluded to, so the desire for the game continues to grow. The lifestyle is vibrant.

To learn more about all Back 9 USA has to offer, you can visit www.back9usa.com. You can also find Back 9 USA on Facebook and on Twitter, @back9usa.

As a special to PGA.com readers, Back 9 USA is offering 10 percent off any purchase through the end of October. Just use coupon code “PGA10” at checkout. 

Back 9 USA: A golf lifestyle brand
Courtesy of Titleist Scotty Cameron
All three new Scotty Cameron Futura putters from Titleist are designed to be extremely stable through the putting stroke.
If you say "trick or treat" to puttermaker Scotty Cameron on Halloween this year, he'll most assuredly reply, "treat."
 
Why? Because Oct. 31 is the launch date for the three latest additions to his Futura family of putters – the X5, X5R and X5 Dual Balance.
 
The new putters join 2013's original Futura X and Futura X Dual Balance to form the most stable line of putters that Cameron offers – Adam Scott won the 2013 Masters with a prototype of the original Futura putter.
 
The X5 model is angled in the back, while the X5R features a more rounded shape. The counterbalanced X5 Dual Balance combines the X5 head style with Cameron's Dual Balance technology to provide maximum stability for golfers who struggle to make a consistent stroke with a conventional length putter. 
 
 
The X5 Dual Balance contains a head weighing in at 400 grams (whereas the X5 and X5R both have standard 350-gram heads) as well as a 50-gram counterweight in the butt of the shaft. Dual Balance putters have a standard length of 38 inches with a 15-inch grip that allows the player to grip down below the counterweight for a more stable stroke.
 
All three models feature a multi-material design with a precision-milled 303 Stainless Steel body and high-grade 6061 aluminum soleplate. A lighter aluminum center section also extends down the wings, and the body features a soft Silver Mist finish contrasted by the anodized black aluminum sole plate and center.
 
By using aluminum, Cameron could hollow out the area under the soleplate and redistribute the weight to the wings to help provide extra stability. It also allowed for a thicker face and topline for better feel and sound. Heel-toe weights directly under the face also contribute to solid feel while increasing forgiveness.
 
 
All three putters come with a new single bend shaft with a higher bend point that Cameron says produces a true face-balanced configuration, and one shaft of offset. The X5 and X5R putters include 10-inch Matador Red Midsize grip that weighs in at 77 grams, while the Dual Balance model features a 15-inch Cameron Dual Balance grip.
 
"The Futura X5 mallet is for someone who likes the stability of a bigger head, the feel of a bigger grip, and likes to look down and see more lines for alignment purposes," said Cameron. "X5 is more of a mechanical shape where the X5R is a softer, rounder shape. 
 
"There’s no right or wrong. Same performance, same weight, same feel," he added. "It all depends on what you like to look at."
 
The X5 and X5R models carry a suggested retail price of $375, while the X5 Dual Balance has a $425 suggested retail price.
 
Here is a video from Titleist introducing the new putters:
 
 
Scotty Cameron adds three models to Futura line of putters
Webb Simpson
USA Today Sports Images
Webb Simpson has used his belly putter since he was in college a decade ago.
Webb Simpson – the defending champion at this week's Shriners Hospitals for Children Open – is one of the last holdouts still using a long putter on the PGA Tour. On Friday, he said that he'll switch to a short putter in 2015, and perhaps even sooner.
 
In fact, the move could come as early as Simpson's appearance in the Dunlop Phoenix tournament in Japan, which begins Nov. 20.
 
"I may switch for Japan in a few weeks," he told PGATour.com, "but I’m still just trying to make sure I'm ready to go and have worked on everything I need to work on before I start."
 
 
Simpson has practiced with a traditional-length putter over the past several years and has been using one in about half his practice at home and during casual rounds, according to the PGATour.com report. He hasn't yet settled on a special type or model of short putter.
 
Simpson began using a belly putter a decade ago in college, and has used the long stick in all four of his PGA Tour victories, including the 2012 U.S. Open. Simpson's Open victory came in a cluster of major wins by players using long putters including Keegan Bradley at the 2011 PGA Championship, Ernie Els at the 2012 British Open and Adam Scott at the 2013 Masters.
 
The U.S. Golf Association and Royal & Ancient Golf Club have banned the use of the anchored stroke commonly used with belly putters and broom-handle putters as of Jan. 1, 2016. Players still will be allowed to use a long putter as long as they don't press it against their body to create a hinge effect.
 
Webb Simpson preparing to switch to short putter
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