Do you prefer a golf GPS, or a laser rangefinder on the course?

GPS, rangefinder, golf
Do you use a GPS device, or a laser rangefinder on the golf course? We surveyed our loyal friends in PGA.com Facebook Nation and learned that it's pretty much a split decision.
By T.J. Auclair
PGA.com
Connect with T.J.

Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Thursday, August 11, 2016 | 11:05 a.m.

There are so many things out there promising to improve your golf game. And, trust us, a lot of them work.

Two of the most important items out there that you should consider are these: A GPS watch/smartphone GPS app of some kind, or a Laser Rangefinder.

Why are these so important, you ask? Because with the help of these products, you're going to discover a more precise yardage, which -- in theory -- means that even your misses should be closer to the hole because you'll be hitting the right club.

RELATED: Here's how measuring devices can shave strokes off your game

With that, we surveyed our hundreds of thousands of friends in PGA.com Facebook Nation to figure what it is you prefer to use between a GPS watch style, or a Laser Rangefinder.

Here are your arguments for why you like one over the other.

Pro-GPS:

Jane Garrard: GPS watch because it gives me front, back and center of the green distance and more accurate distance readings of water and sand. Plus, it's right there on my wrist and I don't have to pull it out and take time to focus it!

Dwight Corky Callihan: As a ranger on a golf course, I prefer the watch. I watch people use the rangefinder and it takes much more time to use than the watch. When I compare distances with my watch with someone using a laser, they are always very close. Besides most of the players that use the lasers don't really need them because they don't play well enough to hit the shot after they use it.

Bruce Jarzmik: I've used a GPS watch for quite awhile. It's always handy and much more convenient then a rangefinder. I don't use it for anything except yardages to the front, middle and back of the green. I've worn it to a number of PGA tour events over the years as a spectator, gives a great idea of what the players yardages are while watching from the ropes.

Mike Shilkitus: GPS watch because its always right there on my wrist and doesn't slow down play.

David Wayne Morgan: GPS. Quick and easy.

John Lancaster: Watch works for me. I've recently upgraded to the Garmin X40 in your picture and it does so much more than just yardages.

Iain Henty: GPS -- much more than a rangefinder. Keeps all your stats up to date -- fairways, GIR, putts, club yardages etc.

John Foglio: The GPS since it doesn't require line of site or steady hands, but not the watch type. The watch makes it look like you're continually checking the time during your round. I'm a high 80s shooter, and the GPS accuracy is MORE than good enough for my game.

Daniel Mcgregor: GPS watch it's more efficient and practical.

Pro-Laser Rangefinder:

Samy Said: I'd rather have the rangefinder at the course. You can have the info of any point such as elevation. Sometimes use the smartphone apps with GPS to give me the info I cannot see at the spot I am.

Dan Sanders: I did the GPS for about 5 years. Found out there were discrepancies on certain holes depending on time of day. Even from height off the ground and spots just to the left or right. This year I bought the rangefinder and have been having a much better time with yardages.

Sammy Saunders: Rangefinder because I don't think they always update the watch stuff when it comes to changes in holes, we play on a lot of temp greens up here in Montana in the spring and a watch is not effective.

Robert Cardone: Rangefinder for me. I find it quicker and no need to worry about inputting any info it just reads the distances for you. I find it making my game easier and more enjoyable.

Payton Gunckel-Johnson: Rangefinder. I can scan specific trees or hazards with it and all that other good stuff. GPS just has never been for me.

Khoa Nguyen: Rangefinder. Can't shoot distance at hazard or bunkers with a watch.

Mike Rushing: Rangefinder simply because it gives me to the pin measurements and slope.

Alex Buysse: Rangefinder. Has so many more uses. Can use it on the driving range to practice better because we all know how accurate the range distances always are. You can also use it to see how far your drive was by shooting back towards the tee box.

Joseph Sciotto: Rangefinder. No need to deal with charging anything, less cords, and mostly because like Khoa mentioned, with a rangefinder can get distance for layup shots!

Geoff Morrison: Laser. Exact yardage to anything.

So, there you have it. Practically split down the middle and fantastic arguments for both.

 

 

T.J. Auclair is a Senior Interactive Producer for PGA.com and has covered professional golf since 1998, traveling to over 60 major championships. You can follow him on Twitter, @tjauclair.