SLDR S driver and woods and SLDR irons join TaylorMade family

TaylorMade SLDR S driver and woods, and SLDR irons
Courtesy of TaylorMade
The TaylorMade SLDR S driver, woods and rescues and the SLDR irons join an already expansive collection of clubs in the SLDR family.
By John Holmes
PGA.com

Series: Golf Buzz

The flagship SLDR franchise at TaylorMade, which has grown steadily since its introduction, is about to undergo a massive expansion. On Monday, the company showed off its forthcoming SLDR S driver, fairway woods and rescue clubs along with the first edition of SLDR irons.

The "S" stands for silver, which is the color of the crowns on the new driver and woods – differentiating them from the dark and white crowns on previous SLDR releases. They're all designed for players of a wide variety of skill levels, and all created to help golfers get more distance. In fact, the company is already using the hashtag #DistanceforAll to promote these new sticks.

The 460cc titanium driver includes the sliding weight system found on those earlier SLDR drivers, but not the adjustable hosel. And, in keeping with TaylorMade's current "Loft Up" campaign to get amateur golfers to use drivers with higher lofts – this new driver comes in lofts of 10, 12, 14 and even 16 degrees. Its stock shaft is the Fujikura Motore Speeder 57.

The fairway woods, whose heads are made of stainless steel, come in 3-wood (in 15- and 17-degree options), 5-wood (in 19- and 21-degree options) and 7-wood (23 degrees), and come standard with a Fujikura Motore Speeder 65 shaft. The stainless steel rescue clubs come in 19-, 22-, 25- and 28-degree models with a Fujikura Motore Speeder 72 stock shaft.

These clubs will be available at retail on May 16. The driver will carry a suggested retail price of $329, while the fairway woods will go for $229 and the rescue clubs for $179.

MORE SLDR: SLDR white driver | SLDR 430 driver | SLDR 14-degree driver | Original SLDR clubs 

The SLDR irons, like the new SLDR S woods, are designed for golfers of all skill levels. The 3- through 7-irons include the Speed Pocket, a narrow slot cut in the sole intended to generate more face flex, that is also found in other recent TaylorMade irons like the RocketBladez, while the 8- and 9-irons feature a solid sole. 

The Speed Pocket permits the face to rebound farther and more easily upon impact, particularly when a golfer hits the ball low on the face. The improved flex, says TaylorMade, promotes increased Coefficient of Restitution – or springiness – and can help most golfers add several yards per shot. The Speed Pocket also helps to lower the Center of Gravity, promoting a higher launch angle, higher peak trajectory and a steep, quick-stopping descent.

The SLDR irons feature a classic design with a thin topline and sole, and a limited amount of offset. They also will be available this month with a suggested retail price of $899 for a set of eight irons with KBS Tour C-Taper 90 steel shafts or three optional Fujikura graphite shafts.

Here is a TaylorMade video explaining more about the new clubs: