TaylorMade shows how Jason Day's putter is made

Jason Day's putter
TaylorMade via YouTube
Welding the hosel into the proper position is a key part of the construction of Jason Day's TaylorMade Itsy Bitsy Spider putter.
By John Holmes
PGA.com

Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Tuesday, September 01, 2015 | 3:38 p.m.
 
Jason Day could probably sink putts with a monkey wrench these days, but the fact is that he's won three of his last four starts – the RBC Canadian Open, the PGA Championship and the Barclays – with a prototype model of TaylorMade's Ghost Itsy Bitsy Spider mallet.
 
Earlier today, TaylorMade posted a video that shows how its technicians build Day's putter from scratch. It is definitely worth the 152 seconds it'll cost you to watch it.
 
TaylorMade describes the putter as an Itsy Bitsy Japan model whose hosel is cut off and then hand-welded with a #3 short slant neck. Day prefers no sightline, TaylorMade says, so the technicians hand-weld in the existing line and buff the top until it's smooth. The head is then coated with a custom acrylic to give it its grey finish. 
 
 
The face insert is the 80/20 insert from the Ghost Tour line, TaylorMade explains. However, the insert must be hand ground to fit into the head, which is slightly smaller than other similar models.
 
The most interesting thing to me is how many individual parts and pieces TaylorMade uses to create this one putter. More specifically, I should say, I'm impressed with how well all these individual components fit together and work together. I don't yet have the details on Day's Itsy Bitsy Spider prototype, but the Daddy Long Legs  – also a large, high-MOI mallet– includes 16 different pieces made out of eight different materials ranging from carbon steel to Surlyn.    
 
The video is also a welcome reminder of the creativity and craftsmanship it takes to produce not only these putters but all of today's best golf clubs. And I'm glad to see that the TaylorMade technicians who assemble these putters get to take a bow at the end of the video – they, and their counterparts who make high-quality equipment at companies large and small around the world, deserve some recognition.
 
By the way, TaylorMade hasn't yet announced any plans to bring Day's putter to market. The company did create 20 exact replicas (since Day set the PGA Championship scoring mark of 20 under par) for sale at $750 apiece, but as you might guess they sold out awfully fast.  
 
Here's the video: