Two new Titleist clubs in Adam Scott's Masters-winning bag

Adam Scott's Scotty Cameron Futura X prototype putter
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In this close-up shot from Masters Saturday, you can see the semi-circular head of Adam Scott's new Titleist Scotty Cameron Futura X long putter with weights on the far corners of the head.
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Series: Golf Buzz

With Adam Scott earning his first green jacket, Titleist certainly had a Masters to remember.

For starters, Scott played with a brand-new Titleist 913D3 driver – in fact, he put it in his competition bag for the first time at Augusta National, though he had been testing it for a month or so. He also was using a new Titleist Scotty Cameron Futura X long putter (and both Scott and Angel Cabrera played Titleist balls, Scott the Pro V1 and Cabrera the Pro V1x).

Scott switched to his new driver from a Titleist 910D3 – the model that preceded the 913D3. His new 913D3 9.5-degree driver has an A-1 (neutral) SureFit Tour Hosel setting with a Graphite Design Tour AD DI 8, X flex graphite shaft at 44.75 inches, according to Titleist. 

Scott was custom fit for the new driver on the Wednesday before the Tampa Bay Championship, according to Titleist, then continued to play his old driver while working with the new one in practice leading up to the Masters. 

"Adam came to Augusta ready to put it in play and was extremely confident in his performance with it following several practice rounds,'' said Titleist. ''Scott cited that he was getting a higher ball flight without increased spin for longer carry distance with the new driver – which would be beneficial to him at Augusta National and going forward.''

Scott had been famously playing a Scotty Cameron Studio Select Kombi long putter, but switched to the Futura X prototype for the Masters. Switching flatsticks for those daunting greens at Augusta National seems like a risky proposition, but Scott had been working with Cameron on the new model since December and the Futura is, generally speaking, quite similar to the Kombi.

The big difference, according to Titleist, is that the new one adds stability through the stroke thanks to the design of its head, and the fact that the head is perimeter weighted. The semi-circular head is made of aluminum and includes a balance bar running perpendicular to the face. In addition, four tungsten weights are positioned under four adjustable stainless steel weights in the far four corners of the head. The one Scott is using is 49 inches tall, and has a 79-degree lie angle and 3 degrees of loft.

In an interesting bit of trivia, Scott's victory completed the career Grand Slam for long putters – Scott at the Masters, Webb Simpson at the 2012 U.S. Open, Ernie Els at the 2012 British Open and Keegan Bradley at the 2011 PGA Championship – and four of the last six majors now have been won by long putters.

Scott was asked whether he thought yet another major won by a long putter might have an impact on the USGA and R&A's decision to ban the anchored putting stroke.

"I don't know that this is going to impact any decisions at all. You know my feeling on it all; that it was inevitable that big tournaments would be won with this equipment, because you know, these are the best players in the world and they practice thousands of hours,'' he said. ''They are going to get good with whatever they are using.  It's inevitable. I don't know that is going to have any impact on any decisions upcoming.''

To see this week's edition of What's in the Winners' Bags, click here. And to see a photo gallery of Scott's Masters-winning clubs, click here.

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