Nike Golf TW'15 golf shoes
Courtesy of Nike Golf
The TW'15 is the first golf shoe to feature the Flyweave technology that Nike implemented in its basketball shoes last year.
The buzz in Phoenix on Tuesday was all about Tiger Woods' 2015 debut at the Waste Management Phoenix Open. Also making its debut is Woods' new golf shoe – the TW'15 from Nike Golf.
The shoe's headline: It's the first golf shoe to feature the Flyweave technology that Nike implemented in its basketball shoes last year.
Even though the movements of a basketball player's feet are different from a golfer's, Nike explained, both require stability and a natural range of motion. Flyweave, the company said, lets designers create a one-piece upper that is woven to provide great strength-to-weight support where it's needed most.
And due to the light weight of the Flyweave technology and the golf-specific Nike Free-inspired outsole, the company said, the TW '15 shoes are 10 percent lighter than last year's model.
"Nike keeps answering the bell every time I want to push the envelope," said Woods. "The new Flyweave technology provides even more stability and support for my foot, and when you pair that with the Free-inspired outsole, I noticed I can push off the ground better and finish my swing with power."
Woods provided detailed feedback that, Nike said, that led to the creation of an outsole three millimeters lower than the TW '14 shoes to maximize feel and longer contact with the ground. Meanwhile, Nike's Integrated Traction in the toe area offers more flexibility to help golfers swing fully without sacrificing traction.
Woods' love of diving and spearfishing also is reflected in the shoe's design. The first sketch from Tobie Hatfield, Nike's senior director of athlete innovation, had starfish-shaped traction elements, while the final product features traction elements in the toe shaped like octopus beaks and the rubber in the tip and heel are inspired by shark scales.
The Nike TW '15 shoes will come in three colorways: University Red/Black, Metallic Silver/Black and Black/White. They'll be available at retail on March 5 with a suggested retail price of $250 per pair, though a limited number will be available on beginning Feb. 2.
Here's a video introducing the shoes:
Nike Golf's new Tiger Woods golf shoe is stronger and more flexible
Puma TitanTour golf shoes
How cool are Puma's TitanTour golf shoes? These are packed in ice at the Puma booth at the PGA Merchandise Show.
In recent years, golf shoe makers have seemingly have been trying as hard as they could to make shoes as lightweight as possible. Light is still right, but many of this year's footwear releases include more comfort and stability to create a more well-rounded shoe.
PUMA: With Rickie Fowler carrying its torch, Puma Golf has always exuded coolness as a brand. And to hammer home its point that its new TitanTour shoes are the "coolest shoes in golf," the shoes in its booth here at the PGA Show are packed in ice.   
The reason: The TitanTour features proactive Outlast cooling technology – which was created to help astronauts stay comfortable in their spacesuits – to regulate the temperature in the shoes and keep golfers cool throughout their rounds. 
To achieve this, Puma applies its Outlast coating to the shoe's insole, and the coating stores excess heat away from the foot. If the temperature inside the shoe cools off, the shoe releases the warmth. And if not, it keeps the heat away from the foot.
The TitanTour also features Puma's Shapelock memory foam – like that in beds – for comfort and stability, an ultra-thin "Power Frame" in the midsole for flexibility and stability, and low-profile cleats. It's available in seven color options: black/white, white/vibrant orange, white/strong blue, white/gray violet, brown/mustang, white/black, and "flash" (a reflective material). 
They'll be available at retail on Feb. 1, with a suggested retail price of $190.
FOOTJOY: One of the shoes that hits this new sweetspot of comfort and stability is the HyperFlex from FootJoy – which looks more progressive and less like a traditional FootJoy release than perhaps anything the company has ever created.
The HyperFlex's most distinctive feature is its FlexGrid 2.0 exoskeleton, which is made of a high-performance material that helps to control the foot during the swing. If the exoskeleton pattern looks familiar to Northeasterners, it's because it was inspired by the cable-like structure that supports the Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Bridge in Boston.
"Our designers have carried out research in civil engineering and construction to create the distinguishing aesthetics of HyperFlex that are also fundamental to its performance," said Doug Robinson, FootJoy's vice president of  design and development worldwide. This outer layer also incorporates a breathable membrane that's guaranteed waterproof for two years.
MORE FROM THE PGA SHOW: Complete coverage | PGA Show video | Photo galleries 
Stability comes from the bottom as well as the top of the HyperFlex. An Optimized Performance Stabilizer (O.P.S.), which you can see on the rear of the shoe, provides support and motion control to the heel during the swing, and the sole is outfitted with SoftSpikes' brand-new Tornado cleats that provide even more grip that standard SoftSpikes models.
The HyperFlex comes in four styles (Navy/Electric Green, White/Grey/Blue, Black and Grey/Orange) for $190, along with three styles (White/Grey/Blue, Grey/Orange and Black/Red) with the Boa Lacing System ($210). The standard model will be available Feb. 15 for $190 per air, while the Boa version will be available April 15 for $210 per pair.
ADIDAS: In its new adipower Boost golf shoes, adidas focuses on optimizing energy return – storing and releasing energy during the golf swing. The company is adapting this technology from its running and basketball shoes to golf for the first time.
In the Boost, thousands of TPU (Thermoplastic Polyurethane) energy capsules are imbedded in the show via a high-pressure steam molding process. The integrity of the EVA foam used in many other shoes can get hard in cold weather and break down in the heat, adidas says, but its Boost material retains its cushioning and responsiveness in all weather conditions.
"During the swing, the energy return is noticeable – as if you can feel the technology in action," said PGA Tour player Jason Day. "They feel good, and look good, too."
Adidas rounded out the shoe by adding gripmore spikes of varying sizes, and placing them in strategic locations on the outsole for improved traction and stability.
The adipower Boost will be available Feb. 27 in four colorways, and will carry a suggested retail price of $190 per pair.
NIKE: The big news about Nike's new Lunar Control 3 shoe is that incorporates a lot of feedback from world No. 1 Rory McIlroy. His big suggestion – make the shoe more stable so he can swing more aggressively without having to worry about slipping.
The Nike designers listened. They widened the shoe's base to improve its stability and remain in contact with the ground longer through impact. They also added a lightweight carbon fiber midfoot shank to make the shoe stronger yet still flexible.
The Lunar Control comes in four colorways: Black/Pure Platinum, Pure Platinum/Bright Crimson, White/Pure Platinum and White/Volt. It is available now with a suggested retail price of $210 per pair. 
ECCO: Danish shoemaker Ecco Golf is out with its BIOM Hybrid 2, the next generation of its best-selling golf shoe. This new edition – worn by Fred Couples, Ernie Els and Graeme McDowell – is 15 percent lighter than the original model thanks to an extra-thin midsole that helps bring players closer to the ground.
The shoe also has a dual-density TPU outsole, which is harder in areas that need the most stability and softer in the key comfort zones around the foot.
Like all Ecco golf shoes, BIOM Hybrid 2 is created using a direct-injection process that bonds the upper and outsole unit to make a one-piece shoe without glue or stitching. This, the company says, gives it an exceptionally water-tight seal as well as comfort and flexibility without the need for a break-in period.
The shoes contain soft and breathable uppers made of yak leather and treated to resist both staining and water. The bottom is outfitted with molded bars that offer hundreds of traction angles for superb grip.
They're available now at a suggested retail price of $195 per pair.
New golf shoes offer improved comfort and stability
SuperStroke + Plus Series putter grips
The SuperStroke + Plus Series grip allows golfers to unscrew the cap and easily screw a 50-gram core (shown) to provide a counterbalancing weight to the top of the putter shaft.
Few golf products have broken out more visibly in recent years than the oversized putter grips from SuperStroke. Jordan Spieth won multiple events with a Flatso Ultra grip on his Scotty Cameron putter last year, and an ever-growing legion of converts is discovering that the big grip can improve their performance on the green.
What can SuperStroke do for an encore? Well, two things. First, the company is debuting its + Plus Series grips, which let golfers add weight to the top of the putter shaft to provide counterbalancing. And second, it has begun making grips for clubs other than putters.
"Backweighting, when combined with a SuperStroke grip, can quickly promote a more repeatable, pendulum stroke, leading to less putts and lower scores," said SuperStroke Vice President of Marketing Greg Sabella. 
The new + Plus Series putter grip has what SuperStroke calls CounterCore Technology. Essentially, it's a threaded cap design that lets golfers easily unscrew the cap and screw in a 50-gram weight to provide counterbalancing. Adding weight to the top end of the shaft helps balance out the weight of the putter's head, and helps golfers make smoother, less wristy strokes.
The + Plus Series grips come in two diameters in the Legacy Profile (2.0, 3.0) along with a 2.0 Flatso version. Each grip is 13.75 inches long and retails for $29.99. The CounterCore weight is an additional $9.99. 
Along with the new putter grips, SuperStroke is expanding into grips for other clubs with the debut of its TX1 Tour Extreme Club Grips.
"We are extremely excited to bring a club grip to the consumers," said Sabella. "We've been working on this for a few years using feedback straight from the tours."
The new grips contain a proprietary blend of two rubber compounds. The top portion is made of a soft, tacky, cord-infused rubber that SuperStroke says provides excellent control, while the bottom portion is a softer, non-cord rubber for better feel and feedback, especially on shots around the green. 
And unlike the putter grips, these aren't oversized – they're much closer to the size of a standard club grip, though there is a slightly larger mid-sized model.
They come in five colors (Black/White, Red/White, Blue/White Grey/White, Green/White), and the mid-sized version is available in Black/White. They retail for $10.99 per grip, while the mid-size version retails for $11.49 per grip. All the new SuperStroke grips will be available online and at leading retailers this spring. 
SuperStroke unveils counterbalancing putter grips
Jordan Spieth
Chris Trotman/The PGA of America
Jordan Spieth says he usually needs to hit a club 2,000 or 3,000 times before he really trusts it.
The beginning of the new calendar year means that many PGA Tour players have switched to new clubs. Among those is fast-rising American star Jordan Spieth.
Updating his bag for 2015 proved to be a multi-month process, he revealed on Wednesday at the PGA Merchandise Show in Orlando, Florida, where he helped to introduce Titleist's new line of clubs and balls.
Speith switched to the 915F 3-wood and 915H.d hybrid last August, a few weeks after Titleist introduced them to their staff players. However, he held off on moving to a new driver and a new ball until near the end of the year – after the PGA Tour playoffs and the Ryder Cup (he upgraded his irons to the 2014 edition of the Titleist AP2 a year ago).
"I'm very picky with my driver and my putter," he explained. "They have to look and feel right, so that when I'm in a big tournament and everything is on the line, all I have to do is hit the shot.
"It is rare for me to trust anything right away," he added. "I usually need to hit 2,000 or 3,000 balls" to get comfortable with a new club.
For his driver switch – to the new 915D2 – Spieth and swing coach Cameron McCormick traveled out to the Titleist Performance Institute in Oceanside, California. On the range there, Spieth focused on remaining very "feel-based" in his swing, he explained, while McCormick focused on the numbers generated by a TrackMan swing analyzer so that together they could hone in on his preferred ball-flight characteristics.
While he was changing out his driver, he moved to the 2015 edition of the Titleist ProV1x ball at the same time. The biggest change wasn't stepping up to the brand-new generation of his previous driver or balls, he said, but to a new shaft.
"I had played the same shafts for six or seven years," he revealed. "Finally, now, I have switched to an Aldila Rogue [Black 60], which a lot of the tour players are going to."
Spieth also spent time at Oceanside updating his wedges, moving to the new SM5 wedges from Titleist's Vokey Designs. He spent an hour and a half, he said, testing them and "getting the grinds and the spin down" like he wanted. 
Updating his putter was the easiest task of all – because he's sticking with the Scotty Cameron 009 model he has used for seven years. "The 009 was my favorite putter" as a young junior golfer, he said, even though he didn't actually have one at that time.
"Adam Scott and Geoff Ogilvy, two of my favorite golfers, used it, and that got me," he said. "I've been using it since I was 15, and I won't be changing anytime soon. 
"I realize technology changes," he noted, "but it feels right for me."
Clearly, all of his new equipment feels right. After making his change, he won the Australian Open by six shots at the end of November, then returned to the United States and immediately captured the Hero World Challenge with a record-setting, wire-to-wire performance. He begins his 2015 campaign next week at the Waste Management Phoenix Open.
Here's Spieth's bag:
Driver: Titleist 915D2 (9.5 degrees of loft, Aldila Rogue Black 60 X shaft)
3-Wood: Titleist 915F (15 degrees, Graphite Design Tour AD DI-7 X shaft)
Hybrid: Titleist 915H.d (20.5 degrees, Graphite Design Tour AD DI-95 X shaft)
3-Iron: Titleist 712U (True Temper Project X 6.0 shaft)
4-9 Irons: Titleist AP2 714 (True Temper Project X 6.0 shaft)
46-Degree Wedge: Titleist Vokey Design SM5 (True Temper Project X 6.0 shaft)
52-Degree Wedge: Titleist Vokey Design SM5 (True Temper Project X 6.0 shaft)
56-Degree Wedge: Titleist Vokey Design SM5 (True Temper Project X 6.0 shaft)
60-Degree Wedge: Titleist Vokey Design SM5 (True Temper Project X 6.0 shaft)
Putter: Titleist Scotty Cameron 009
Ball: Titleist Pro V1x
For Jordan Spieth, new clubs "must look right and feel right"
golf balls
Many of golf's top ballmakers are focused on creating softer balls that feel better on impact and react more precisely.
Titleist kicked off the 2015 PGA Merchandise Show bright and early Wednesday by formally introducing the 2015 editions of its Pro V1 and Pro V1x. The new models of Titleist's flagship ball – which is marking its 15th anniversary this year – are softer than ever, and "soft" is a common characteristic among the new golf balls on display here in Orlando.
The new Pro V1 and Pro V1x are designed "for total performance from tee to green," said Titleist Vice President Mary Lou Bohn, and are "the best-performing golf balls for all golfers." They offer "softer feel, and spin a little bit more," she added.
The soft feel of these 2015 editions comes from a reformulated thermoset urethane elastomer cover that helps to deliver more short-game spin and control, which Titleist says helps gives golfers the confidence to hit the ball closer to the hole.
On its cover, the new ProV1 has a spherically-tiled 352 tetrahedral dimple design. Inside the three-piece ball is a very soft-compression ZG process core and an ionomeric casing layer. The new formulation also creates a penetrating trajectory and more durability than previous models.  
The four-piece ProV1x also features a ZG process dual core – which helps generate much of the distance the ball is famous for – along with an ionomeric casing layer, softer thermoset urethane elastomer cover and spherically-tiled 328 tetrahedral dimple design. These characteristics create a higher launch and less spin than the ProV1 to help achieve that extra distance.
CALLAWAY: "Soft" is so important to Callaway that the company even put the word in the name of its newest ball. The company is so high on the Chrome Soft ball that it says it will "completely redefine golf ball performance" because golfers no longer have to sacrifice distance to gain more feel and vice-versa.
The Chrome Soft is built around a new proprietary SoftFast Core. This core creates a very low compression without sacrificing ball speed, Callaway says, which helps retain energy off the driver to maximize distance, while still allowing golfers to compress the ball enough on shorter shots to enhance its feel and gain control on shots into the green.
Surrounding this core is a mantle layer that helps to retain the energy stored in the core, which aids faster ball speed. And covering that middle layer is a DuraSpin cover that Callaway says is its softest and most durable cover to date. The cover also helps to optimize lift and reduce drag to increase distance.
WILSON: Wilson Golf calls the new editions of its Wilson Staff Duo ball nothing less than the world's softest golf ball, and says its new Duo Spin is the world's softest multilayer ball.
The Duo achieves an extremely low 29 compression via a larger, rubber-rich core for extremely soft feel and increased velocity off the tee and with long irons. Its feel, Wilson says, also improves its playability around the greens, while its two-piece construction delivers minimal spin off the driver face to aid in accuracy and its seamless 302 dimple pattern produces a consistent ball flight. 
The Duo Spin ball has similar distance and feel characteristics to the Duo, but has a slightly higher 35 compression rate. It was created for golfers seeking more workability around the green, but also want soft feel and low spin off the driver. 
The Duo Spin's three-piece construction adds an inner mantle made from a soft DuPont HPF material that increases spin on mid- and short-iron shots and provides increased resilience for ball velocity and distance. The ionomer cover on both balls helps to generate high-lift characteristics on tee shots and long approaches from the fairway. 
BRIDGESTONE: One of the prominent new ball lines promoting distance over soft feel comes from Bridgestone, which is out with a newly redesigned E-Series family dedicated to help golfers overcome what the company calls their "ballflight challenges" while also adding significant distance.
This is possible, Bridgestone says, because of its new WEB Dimple Technology, which is implemented in every model of the 2015 e-Series line. 
The new dimple design deploys a cutting-edge "spidering" pattern that affords 10 percent more dimple-surface-coverage than the previous e-Series models. This new pentagonal pattern combines with the aerodynamics of Bridgestone's Dual Dimple design to reduce drag for a more penetrating ball flight and greater distance. 
"We're very pleased with distance increases we've seen from WEB Dimple Technology during testing. In both robot and live testing, we have seen substantial distance increases versus previous models," said Director of Marketing Corey Consuegra. "The distance increases are consistent and significant."
The e-Series family consists of three models. The two-piece e5 is features urethane construction for golfers seeking a higher ball flight, more distance and greater control. 
The multilayer – and extremely soft – e6 is designed to help players eliminate slices and hooks. And the multilayer e7 is best for players wanting to produce longer, more penetrating shots and reduce "ballooning" in windy conditions.
All these new balls are either available now or will be in stores within the next few weeks.
Soft feel is common characteristic of 2015 golf balls
Odyssey works putters
Courtesy of Odyssey Golf
The Odyssey Works 2-Ball Fang mallet (left) has curved "fangs" for extra stability, while the #7 has weighted alignment wings. Both have Odyssey's new Fusion RX mesh and Versa alignment stripes.
The best way to describe the new line of Odyssey Works putters from Odyssey Golf? Let's just call them Odyssey's version of a greatest hits album.
The faces of the 11 putters in the Works family feature a thin (0.406 millimeters) stainless steel mesh laid across a White Hot insert – the insert found in some of Odyssey's best and most popular putters over the past several years. The mesh, called Fusion RX, is similar to the insert in the company's recent Metal-X line of putters, helps get the ball rolling straight and true.
The idea behind blending these two elements in one face is to combine the mesh's skid reduction with the feel provided by the White Hot insert, and Odyssey says the new Works putters reduce skidding even quicker than the Metal-X models.
This new impact zone is housed in 11 putter heads outfitted with Odyssey's popular Versa color scheme – the bold black and white stripes that serve as very distinctive alignment aids.
Two of the putters stand out from the group – the Versa 2-Ball Fang mallet and the heavier Tank Versa 2-Ball Fang mallet. Both contain Odyssey's 2-Ball alignment system with a pair of "fangs" – curved bars arcing from front to back that add perimeter weight to increase their stability through the swing.
The 2-Ball Fang has a 360-gram head with a full shaft offset, while the Tank model has a slightly heavier 380-gram head and is counterbalanced by a weight in the butt of the shaft to improve its stability. It also has a full shaft of offset. The 2-Ball Fang retails for $199.99, while the Tank version goes for $219.99.
MORE FROM CALLAWAY AND ODYSSEY: Big Bertha Alpha 815 drivers | Versa Jailbird putter
The other Odyssey Works models are the:
--#1. A 350-gram heel-toe weighted blade with a crank-neck hosel and a full-shaft offset. $179.99. 
--#1 Wide. A 350-gram blade with a wide flange, double-bend shaft and full-shaft offset. $179.99.
--Tank #1 Wide. A 380-gram blade with heel-toe weighting and a wide flange, it also has counterbalancing weight in the butt of its double-bend shaft and a full-shaft offset. $199.99.  
--Arm Lock #1 Wide. A 400-gram blade with heel-toe weighting and a wide flange. It has a full-shaft offset and its double-bend shaft is 43 inches long to "lock" into the golfer's arm for more stability and control. $199.99.
--Tank Rossie #1. A 380-gram face-balanced mallet with counterbalance weighting in the butt of its double-bend shaft, and a full-shaft offset. $199.99.
--V-Line. A perimeter-weighted mallet with a new "Big T" version of the Versa alignment system and a full-shaft offset. $179.99.
--#7. A modified 350-gram mallet with weighted alignment wings, a double-bend shaft and a full-shaft offset. $179.99
--Tank #7. A modified 380-gram mallet with weighted alignment wings and counterbalance weighting in the butt of the double-bend shaft, and a full-shaft offset. $199.99.
--#9. A 350-gram flanged blade with toe weighting, a heel shaft, a long hosel and a half-shaft offset. $179.99.
All the putters except for the Arm Lock model can be outfitted with an oversized SuperStroke grip for an extra $20. They're all available for pre-order now and will be in stores on Jan. 30. 
Here's a quick introductory video from Odyssey:
Odyssey Works putters combine best of previous models
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