Arron Oberholser thinks long putters provide advantage

Arron Oberholser
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"Guys I've talked to that have gone from conventional to anchoring say [it's] an advantage, especially [on] short putts," said PGA Tour player Arron Oberholser on Twitter.
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Series: Golf Buzz

The reports out of the WGC-HSBC Champions that Keegan Bradley and Ernie Els might consider legal action if golf's governing bodies ban long putters prompted fellow PGA Tour player Arron Oberholser to chime in on Twitter.

In China, Bradley said that he would have the backing of many of his peers in fighting a ban.

"I think we all would be together on this," said Bradley. "We're all in the same boat."

Apparently, though, Oberholser hasn't boarded that ship just yet.

"The guys threatening to sue if anchoring is banned are not helping their case. Seems to me they're admitting [it's] an advantage for them," he tweeted on Friday. "Guys I've talked to that have gone from conventional to anchoring say [it's] an advantage, especially short putts. 'Improves the motion'."

Oberholser, like the rest of us, is curious as to exactly how a ruling from the U.S. Golf Association and the R&A would be phrased.

"I think they will mention the word 'Torso'," Oberholser tweeted. "Another option would be to limit the length of a putter."

Limiting putter length is a notion that Tiger Woods endorsed earlier this year. There's been no real indication whether or not that would be part of any decision.

Oberholser also tossed out a nugget that I hadn't heard, and haven't confirmed.

"One of real reasons for the talk of banning anchoring; I heard more than 50% of the players at the USGA Junior Amateur had one in play," he tweeted.

After his comments had floated about the Twitterverse for a bit, Oberholser got a response from a fellow tweeter, who said to him "Then fix the ball."

That, replied Oberholser, "will be fixed after the putter, or so a little birdie told me."

Oberholser then added that he would love to have a standard ball.

"Same for everyone. Let us 'figure it out, '" he tweeted. "Pretty much had one in the wound ball [which was widely used by top players before the advent of the current solid-construction balls]. The cream rose to top."

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