January 17, 2015 - 4:53pm
andrew.prezioso's picture
Child on Christmas
Looks like this child will remember this Christmas for many years to come.

Sure, Christmas was about four weeks ago but this home video is just starting to make the rounds on the Internet. And plus, it's pretty darn cute. 

Take a look at it for yourself, and see how excited this child gets when he finds out his present is a new set of golf clubs. 

Related: Watch Rory make a young fan's day at the BMW Championship

 

Looks like he'll be remembering this Christmas for a long time. 

Thanks to Golf News Net Geoff Shackelford for bringing this to our attention.

Golf clubs make child's Christmas
January 17, 2015 - 9:52am
andrew.prezioso's picture
Rickie Fowler
Rickie Fowler | Instagram
Rickie Fowler got a ride from a camel that was off the 18th green.

Rickie Fowler went out in style after Saturday's third round of the Abu Dhabi Championship.

First, Fowler made his first eagle of the tournament on 18. Then, he decided to go for a quick ride on a camel that was off of the 18th green. 

 

 

When #InAbuDhabi you ride a camel #SaddleUpPartner #MikeMikeMikeMike

A photo posted by Rickie Fowler (@therealrickiefowler) on

 

Of course, while riding a camel is a pretty neat thing to do, we've seen stories where it doesn't end so well. Back in October, Thorbjorn Olesen made news when he revealed that he had suffered a groin injury after falling off a camel.

Fowler's camel-riding foray seems to have gone off without a hitch. 

Overall, it's been a tough tournament for Fowler, who shot a 73 on Saturday and is 19 strokes behind leader Martin Kaymer.  

Rickie Fowler rides a camel at Abu Dhabi
January 17, 2015 - 9:30am
andrew.prezioso's picture
Mid Ocean Club
Ken Minschwaner | Instagram
Here's one option for a winter golf getaway: the Mid Ocean Club in Bermuda.

Not all of us are lucky enough to live in an area where it's possible to play golf 365 days a year. Some people need to go on vacation in order to get in a round. 

That's why we want to hear from you. We want to know where you would go, what courses you would play, who would go with you, etc. And of course, in this hypothetical, time and money are no obstacles. 

Related: Your favorite golf holes | Golf course bucket list

The good news is there are plenty of options. From the Caribbean to Florida to out west, there are many courses where playing in January and February are entirely possible. 

So where would you go? 

 

 

 

Your favorite winter golf trips
Bubba Watson's car
Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson
Bubba Watson's custom-built 1939 Cadillac LaSalle C-Hawk Custom Roadster raised $410,000 for Birdies for the Brave on Friday.
Bubba Watson, as we all know, is quite a car guy. He's not in the Ian Poulter category – at least not yet – but is the proud owner of the General Lee, not to mention a bulletproof pickup truck, one sexy Corvette and a hovercraft that doubles as a golf cart.
 
As it turns out, his collection also included the beauty in the photo above – until Friday night, when he sold it during the big Barrett-Jackson winter auction in Scottsdale, Arizona.
 
Watson's car went for a whopping $410,000, and the two-time Masters champ donated every cent of the proceeds to Birdies for the Brave.
 
The car is a custom-built homage to the 1939 Cadillac LaSalle C-Hawk Custom Roadster, which was a favorite of legendary car designer Harley Earl. It's handcrafted out of steel and outfitted with a fuel-injected, supercharged 556-horsepower Cadillac LSA engine with a 6-speed automatic transmission and custom Borla exhaust.
 
 
This C-Hawk, as it's known, also has air conditioning, custom-designed billet wheels, power windows, a C4 Corvette suspension with DANA 44 rear end, Dakota digital instrumentation, hidden headlights, and both GPS and a sound system. 
 
"It's an honor to support the Green Beret Foundation and Birdies for the Brave, who do so much to give back to members of our U.S. Armed Forces and their families," Watson said when he entered the car into the auction a few weeks ago. 
 
Birdies for the Brave was created in 2006 by Phil and Amy Mickelson to support combat-injured troops, and the PGA Tour subsequently adopted it and expanded it to include a variety of military outreach and appreciation activities. To date, it has raised more than $13 million for charities that directly serve wounded warriors and military families.  
 
The Green Beret Foundation, which works with Birdies for the Brave, is also close to Watson's heart, seeing as how his late father, Gerry Watson, was a lieutenant in the U.S. Army Special Forces during the Vietnam War, and taught Watson to play golf at the age of six. 
 
Bubba, by the way, spent part of his day playing golf with John Schneider, who of course played Bo Duke on "The Dukes of Hazzard." Even better, Watson got Schneider to autograph the General Lee – which, he stressed, is not for sale.
 
 
 

The General Lee getting signed by Bo Duke/John Schneider today at @barrett_jackson! #wahooo #dukesofhazzard #notforsale

A photo posted by Bubba Watson (@bubbawatson) on

 
 
 
 
 
Bubba Watson auctions off an extremely cool car for charity
January 16, 2015 - 7:14pm
Posted by:
Doug Ferguson
john.holmes's picture
Golf Channel
Associated Press
The Golf Channel now has nearly 700 employees and will televise 189 events from the major tours around the world this year.

HONOLULU (AP) — Twenty years ago on Saturday, Arnold Palmer flipped a ceremonial switch to launch a risky venture that cynics saw as an easy punch line.

 

The Golf Channel?

 

Tennis magazine mocked the idea as "24 hours of chubby guys in bad clothes speaking in jargon that only they understand." Rick Reilly, in his column for Sports Illustrated, suggested programming that included "Body by Jack," a workout session with Jack Nicklaus in which he "takes you through a 30-minute routine you can do without getting out of the cart."

 

Even the players had their doubts.

 

"I'm always stunned that there's enough golf stuff for 24 hours a day," Paul Goydos said. "I would have thought, 'Do we really need a Golf Channel? Is there enough viewership? Enough material?' I thought it would be a tough row to hoe, in my opinion. They've proven me wrong."

 

Players today can't imagine life without Golf Channel.

 

"That's all I watch," Jason Day said. "I say I don't watch much golf, but I do. Pretty much every day I'm watching Golf Channel."

 

The network was launched on Jan. 17, 1995, and could be seen in about 10,000 homes. It began as a premium fee ($6.95) and changed to part of a basic cable package by the end of the year, helping it to reach 1.4 million homes.

 

Twenty years later, Golf Channel can be seen in roughly 120 million homes in 83 countries and is broadcast in 12 languages around the world. Its offices in Orlando, Florida, have more than quadrupled to 160,000 square feet.

 

MORE: Bubba auctions cool car, raises $401K for charity | Check out golf course webcams

 

And there is no shortage of programming.

 

The first tournament it broadcast was the Dubai Desert Classic, which Fred Couples won in 1995. On its 20-year anniversary, Golf Channel will have four hours of live coverage from Rory McIlroy's season debut in Abu Dhabi; seven hours of taped coverage and four hours of live coverage from the Sony Open (including a pre-game show), along with its popular "Morning Drive" and a news show.

 

"It's a big deal," Palmer said Friday morning from his office at Bay Hill. "Everybody is excited and happy with the channel and all the stuff going on. Who would ever thought 20 years ago ... all the things that have happened with Golf Channel?"

 

Palmer was a co-founder with TV mogul Joe Gibbs, who plans to make an appearance on Golf Channel on Saturday to commemorate the anniversary. Golf Channel began 18 months before Tiger Woods turned pro, so it was blessed with good timing. Comcast eventually bought out the network, and then acquired NBC Universal, which gave Golf Channel even greater resources and branding capabilities.

 

The most significant moment in its 20 years was when the PGA Tour signed it to a 15-year deal in 2006 that gave Golf Channel rights to Thursday and Friday rounds from the PGA Tour, along with full tournament coverage for the opening three events and the tournaments in the fall. Golf Channel previously had the European Tour and other global events, along with the other three U.S. tours (seniors, women and what is now Web.com).

 

But there was another turning point equally important in the infancy of the network, a time when even Palmer had his doubts about the future. The question was whether it was prudent for Palmer and his investors to get out and cut their losses.

 

"We were questioning what we were doing and the viability of what was happening," Palmer said. "And they said, 'How do you feel?' I said, 'Let me say this to you: If I didn't try to hit it through the trees a few times, none of us would be here.'"

 

The quote is now on a wall at Golf Channel headquarters, a daily reminder that when you hitch up your pants and go for broke, the reward can be immense.

 

"Even though we're now part of a big company, you still want the spirit of how this place was founded to be a living, breathing part of what makes it tick," Golf Channel President Mike McCarley said. "That culture and everything Arnold represented, that should be part of it."

 

GALLERIES: Week's best golf equipment photos | Golf course photos by pro tour players

 

McCarley said Golf Channel now is the most affluent network of those devoted to a sport, mainly because of the demographic of those watching.

 

Davis Love III smiled at the coincidence that a network co-founded by Palmer would benefit from the arrival of Woods, the two players who in different ways made golf appealing to the masses.

 

"It's make a big difference for our sport," Love said.

 

Golf Channel has kept the newspaper clippings from two decades ago that either panned the idea of a golf channel or predicted failure.

 

"That was an easy column to write," McCarley said. "It was the first of its kind. Now every sport has its own network."

 

Geoff Ogilvy of Australia was among the skeptics. He remembers when he first came over to America to play in events like the Western Amateur and the Porter Cup. Golf Channel was just getting started.

 

"Coming from Australia, we had four channels and we didn't have any cable," Ogilvy said. "I thought this was cool, but no chance anyone was going to watch. They had all these infomercials, like Orlimar Trimetal. Remember that? So I was like, 'Who's going to watch this?' But in the last 10 years when they got the tour deal, I think it really kicked on. Now it's a legitimate channel — really legitimate.

 

"ESPN was the same," he said. "I remember when they started, they showed Aussie Rules football because it was the only thing they could afford. ESPN only got there when they started showing real sport, and Golf Channel is probably the same. It's a big channel now. It's a big part of our tour."

 

How far has Golf Channel come?

 

There are sheer numbers. Golf Channel had the rights to 23 domestic tournaments when it began (mostly the LPGA and Nike tours) and 41 events from Europe, South Africa and Australia. This year, it will televise 189 events from the major tours around the world. It began with 180 employees and now has nearly 700; McCarley said 13 employees have been there from the start.

 

And there are intangibles. On the day before it celebrated its 20-year anniversary, Palmer watched his grandson, Sam Saunders, compete on the PGA Tour on a network that he helped to start.

 

Copyright (2015) Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

 

This article was written by Doug Ferguson from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.

 

Golf Channel, lampooned at creation, celebrates 20 years on air
January 16, 2015 - 7:59am
Michael.Benzie's picture
Rory McIlroy
European Tour
Rory McIlroy celebrates his hole-in-one with playing partner Rickie Fowler.

One day after Tom Lewis and Miguel Angel Jimenez each made a hole-in-one in the Abu Dhabi Championship, world No. 1 Rory McIlroy knocked one in of his own.

RELATED: January's most creative reader golf course photos | Share your hole in one

Here it is, McIlroy's very first ace in European Tour competition:

That wasn't only McIlroy's first hole-in-one on the European Tour, but also his first as a professional.

It happened on the 177-yard, par-3 15th hole and he used a 9-iron. The ace helped McIlroy to a 6-under 66. At 11-under par, he enters the weekend trailing leader Martin Kaymer by two shots. 

 

Watch: Rory's first professional ace