The putt that put Harbor Shores on the map

Jack Nicklaus
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Jack Nicklaus has been known to make the game look easy. But this was just ridiculous.
By T.J. Auclair
PGA.com
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Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 | 3:33 p.m.

BENTON HARBOR, Mich. -- The Senior PGA Championship presented by KitchenAid takes place this week at Harbor Shores.

Harbor Shores also hosted the 2012 Senior PGA Championship, which was won by England's Roger Chapman.

It usually takes a lot of time for a course to generate notable moments in its history. That isn't the case with Harbor Shores.

RELATED: What's it like to play Harbor Shores? | Senior PGA Champ. coverage

This course was put on the map the day it officially opened, July 10, 2010, thanks to its designer Jack Nicklaus.

As part of the grand opening, Nicklaus was joined by Arnold Palmer, Tom Watson and Johnny Miller to play 18 holes.

When the group reached the par-5 10th hole, something unfolded that you couldn't make up.

The 10th green at Harbor Shores is one of the most undulating on the course -- which is saying something because a lot of the greens here are of the hit-and-hope variety: hit it and hope it finishes somewhere reasonably close to the hole.

On opening day, Miller found his third shot on the lower level of the green, with the pin placement up a hill in the back, middle portion of the green, 102 feet away with the kinds of twists and turns you only expect to see on a roller coaster.

At first, Miller contemplated using a wedge, arguing it was the only wat to get close to the hole. Nicklaus insisted the ball could be putted up there.

With that, Nicklaus walked down to where Miller was, dropped a golf ball, took a quick look at the hole and proceeded to do this:

 

 

Amazing.

So, this week when you see players struggling for a three-putt on the 10th green at Harbor Shores, just remember it's not as easy as Nicklaus made it look.

Follow T.J. Auclair on Twitter, @tjauclair.

 

T.J. Auclair is a Senior Interactive Producer for PGA.com and has covered professional golf since 1998, traveling to over 60 major championships. You can follow him on Twitter, @tjauclair.