Tiger Woods named PGA Tour Player of the Year

Tiger Woods
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For the 11th time in his career, Tiger Woods has been named the PGA Tour's Player of the Year.
By T.J. Auclair, Senior Interactive Producer
PGA.com
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Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Friday, September 27, 2013 | 11:02 a.m.
The PGA Tour announced on Friday that Tiger Woods -- for the 11th time in his career -- has been named the Player of the Year.
 
Jordan Spieth was named PGA Tour Rookie of the Year.
 
 
PGA Tour members who played in at least 12 official money events in 2013 were eligible to vote following the conclusion of the Tour Championship by Coca-Cola.The balloting process ended on Sept. 26.
 
“On behalf of the PGA TOUR, my congratulations to Tiger and Jordan for their impressive performances in 2013,” said PGA TOUR Commissioner Tim Finchem. “Tiger’s five wins came against some of the strongest fields in golf including The Players and two World Golf Championships while Jordan’s rookie season was historic in terms of his accomplishments for a player just 20 years old. The member vote reflects the respect their peers have for both players.”
 
While Woods didn't capture a major championship in 2013, it was still a remarkable season. His five victories were three more than anyone else on the PGA Tour. Woods didn't miss a single cut in 16 starts and walked away with eight top-10 finishes overall.
 
Spieth, meanwhile, began the year with no status on the PGA Tour, relying on sponsor's exemptions for starts.
 
Spieth made history at the John Deere Classic where he became the youngest player (19 years, 11 months and 18 days) to win on the PGA Tour since Ralph Guldahl (19 years, 8 months, 3 days) at the 1931 Santa Monica Open.
 
In his 23 starts, Spieth tied Brandt Snedeker and Bill Haas for most top-10 finishes on Tour with nine, including runner-up finishes in three events.
 
Follow T.J. Auclair on Twitter, @tjauclair.
 
 

T.J. Auclair is a Senior Interactive Producer for PGA.com and has covered professional golf since 1998, traveling to over 60 major championships. You can follow him on Twitter, @tjauclair.


Comments

cari33

So many of you seem to forget that Tigers peers voted for him for this award. The men he plays golf with week after week. They disagree with all of you haters. Clearly they felt he deserved it more than anyone else. What YOU think does NOT matter! Tiger is a superstar. He may not have a sweet gentle disposition like so many of you wish he had, but he is the best golfer and he has done more for the game than anyone else ever has.

stockbox

knightonguard give us all a break, everyone knows of Tigers past achievements, he is a great player, again Tiger did NOT win a major and does not deserve the recent award. His past achievements should mean nothing and the advertisers dollars should not mean anything either.

Thanks for your passion although it is misguided. Shall I remind you of Tigers foul mouth and past failings? He is Not a gentleman...

JT

knightonguard

THE PGA TOUR PLAYER OF THE YEAR IS SELECTED BY THE PLAYERS BY BALLOT. USUALLY (EXCEPTING 1990) THE PGA POY AND THE PGA TOUR POY ARE THE SAME. SO FOR THOSE WHO FEEL THAT THE PGA IS CATERING TO HIM, DO SOME HOMEWORK. WHAT ABOUT TIGER'S PEERS? ARE THEY CATERING TO HIM?
HE WON IT BECAUSE HE DESERVED IT. I AGREE WITH THOSE WHO SAY WE SHOULD APPRECIATE HIS GREATNESS INSTEAD OF TRYING TO TEAR HIM DOWN. WHO ELSE IN ANY SPORT HAS ACCOMPLISHMENTS TO EVEN COME CLOSE TO TIGER'S? HERE'S A REMINDER:
Chronology
AGES 2 - 5 (1978-81)
• Appeared on both CBS News and Mike Douglas Show putting with Bob Hope (age 2)
• Shot 48 for nine holes at Navy Golf Club in Cypress, Calif. (age 3)
• Appeared on That's Incredible (age 5)

AGES 6 - 13 (1982-89)
• Appeared on Today Show, Good Morning America, ESPN, CBS, NBC and ABC
• First hole-in-one, May 12, 1982 (age 6)
• Won - Optimist International Junior World at ages 8, 9, 12 and 13
• Second place - Insurance Youth Golf Classic (Big "I") National at age 13
• Handicaps of 2 at age 11, scratch at age 13

AGE 14 (1990)
• Won - Optimist International Junior World (fifth time)
• Won - Insurance Youth Golf Classic (Big "I") National (youngest ever to win)
• Second place - PGA National Junior Championship
• Competed in Southern California/French Junior Cup, Paris, France
• Semi-finalist at U.S. Junior Amateur Championship
• Southern California Player of the Year

AGE 15 (1991)
• Won - U.S. Junior Amateur Championship (youngest ever to win)
• Won - Optimist International Junior World (sixth time)
• Won - CIF-SCGA High School Invitational Championship (individual)
• Won - Southern California Junior Championship
• Won - PING/Phoenix Junior (AJGA)
• Won - Edgewood Tahoe Junior Classic (AJGA)
• Won - Los Angeles City Junior Championship
• Won - Orange Bowl Junior International
• AJGA Player of the Year
• Golf Digest Player of the Year
• Southern California Player of the Year
• Titleist-Golfweek National Amateur of the Year
• First Team - Rolex Junior All-American
• Participated in U.S. Amateur Championship

AGE 16 (1992)
• Won - U.S. Junior Amateur Championship (only golfer to win twice)
• Won - PING/Phoenix Junior (AJGA)
• Won - Nabisco Mission Hills Desert Junior (AJGA)
• Won - Pro Gear San Antonio Shootout (AJGA)
• Won - Insurance Youth Golf Classic (Big "I") National
• Second place - Optimist Junior International World
• Fifth place - Sunnehanna Amateur Tournament of Champions
• Played in Nissan Los Angeles Open on PGA TOUR and U.S. Open Sectional Qualifying
• Top 32, U.S. Amateur Championship
• First Team - Rolex Junior All-American
• Golf Digest Player of the Year
• Southern California Player of the Year
• Titleist-Golfweek National Amateur of the Year
• Golf World Player of the Year

AGE 17 (1993)
• Won - U.S. Junior Amateur Championship (third time)
• Won - Southern California Junior Best Ball Championship
• Second place - AJGA Taylor Made Woodlands
• Top 32, U.S. Amateur Championship
• First Team - Rolex Junior All-American
• Played in the following PGA TOUR events: Nissan Los Angeles Open, Honda Classic, GTE Byron Nelson Classic
• Played in the U.S. Open Sectional Qualifying
• Southern California Player of the Year
• Golf World Player of the Year
• Winner, Dial Award - emblematic of top national high school male athlete for 1993
• Accepted scholarship at Stanford University in November 1993 (to enter Stanford in 1994)

AGE 18 (1994)
• Won - U.S. Amateur Championship, Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. (youngest ever to win; largest comeback ever)
• Won - Western Amateur Championship
• Won - Southern California Golf Association Amateur Championship
• Won - Pacific Northwest Amateur Championship
• Won - William Tucker Invitational (first collegiate event)
• Won - Jerry Pate Invitational
• Semi-finalist - California State Amateur Championship
• Tied sixth place - Porter Cup
• Played in the Johnnie Walker Asian Classic (Thailand)
• Played in the following PGA TOUR events: Nestle Invitational, Buick Classic, Motorola Western Open
• Los Angeles Times Player of the Year
• Orange County Player of the Year
• Orange County League Most Valuable Player (fourth time)
• Member, United States team at the World Amateur Team Championships in Versailles, France (led team to an 11-stroke victory by shooting rounds of 71-75-67-72-285)
• Golf World Man of the Year

AGE 19 (1995)
• Won - U.S. Amateur Championship, Newport Country Club, Newport, R.I.
• Won - Stanford Invitational
• Finalist for the Sullivan Award
• Tied 41st - Masters Tournament (first professional major championship) with scores of 72-72-77-72-293 (only amateur to make the cut)
• Withdrew from U.S. Open Championship at Shinnecock Hills because of wrist injury
after five holes of the second round (shot 74 in first round)
• Tied 67th - British Open at St. Andrews, Scotland, with scores of 74-71-72-78-295
• Played in Motorola Western Open on PGA TOUR and Scottish Open on PGA European Tour
• Member, United States team in Walker Cup Match in Porthcawl, Wales
• Tied fifth - NCAA Championship, Columbus, Ohio, with scores of 73-72-70-71-286
• Pac-10 Player of the Year
• First-team All-American
• Stanford's Male Freshman of the Year (all sports)

AGE 20 (1996)
• Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year
• PGA TOUR Rookie of the Year
• Won - Disney World/Oldsmobile Classic
• Won - Las Vegas Invitational
• Won - U.S. Amateur Championship, Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club, Cornelius, Ore. (only golfer ever to win three consecutive titles, record 18 consecutive match-play victories).
• Won - NCAA Championship, The Honors Course, Chattanooga, Tenn., with scores of 69-67-69-80-285
• Won - John A. Burns Invitational
• Won - Cleveland Golf Championship
• Won - Tri-Match (Stanford, Arizona, Arizona State)
• Won - Cougar Classic
• Won - Pac-10 Championship (shot course-record 61)
• Won - NCAA West Regional
• Missed cut - Masters Tournament with scores of 75-75-150
• Fred Haskins College Player of the Year
• Jack Nicklaus College Player of the Year
• Pac-10 Player of the Year
• First-team All-American
• Al Masters Award co-winner (presented to the outstanding athlete at Stanford for attaining the highest standards of athletic performance, leadership and academic achievement)
• Finished tied for 82nd in U.S. Open with scores of 76-69-77-72-294 and had lead through 13 holes of first round at Oakland Hills
• Tied British Open 72-hole record for an amateur with total of 281 (75-66-70-70) at Royal Lytham & St. Annes, England, matching Iain Pyman at Royal St. George's in 1993.
His second-round five-under 66 was the lowest by an amateur since Frank Stranahan registered the same score at Royal Troon in 1950
• Earned $940,420 worldwide in 11 tournaments as a professional, an average of $85,493 per event. Earned $790,594 on the PGA TOUR in eight events as a professional, finishing 25th on the money list. Earnings were the second-most for a rookie in PGA TOUR history behind David Duval ($881,436 in 26 events in 1995)
• Became the first player to win twice in his first year on the PGA TOUR since Robert Gamez won the 1990 Northern Telecom Tucson Open and Nestle Invitational. Became the first player to record five consecutive top-five finishes on the PGA TOUR since Curtis Strange in 1982
• Advanced to No. 33 on the world ranking, the fastest rise into the top 50 in history

AGE 21 (1997)
• The Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year
• ESPY Male Athlete of the Year (Tied with Ken Griffey Jr.)
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $2,066,833 (most ever won in a single year)
• Won $2,440,831 worldwide in 25 events.
• Won - Masters Tournament (first professional major championship)
• Won - Mercedes Championships
• Won - Asian Honda Classic (Thailand)
• Won - GTE Byron Nelson Classic
• Won - Motorola Western Open
• Qualified for United States team for Ryder Cup Matches
• Set Masters record for youngest champion (21 years, three months, 14 days) and became the first major champion of African or Asian heritage
• Set Masters 72-hole record with a total of 270 (70-66-65-69) and set Masters record with 12-stroke victory margin
• Other Masters records set or tied: most shots under par, second nine (16), low middle 36 holes (131), low first 54 holes (201), tied Raymond Floyd, 1976), low last 54 holes (200),
lowest score par-five holes in one round (six under par, tied Steve Jones, 1990), largest 54-hole lead (nine strokes), youngest 36-hole and 54-hole leader, most threes, one tournament (26)
• Shot 59, 13 under par in practice round on April 4 at home course, Isleworth Country Club, Windermere, Fla., with two eagles, nine birdies and two pars on par-five holes
• Set record with five PGA TOUR victories in his first 16 events. He was the second-youngest (21 years, four months, 20 days) to win five events, behind Horton Smith (20 years, 10 months, one day) in 1929
• Achieved $2 million in PGA TOUR career earnings in a record 16 events (previous record was 50 events by Ernie Els in 1990-96)
• Achieved No. 1 world ranking in his 42nd week as a professional and became the youngest-ever No. 1 golfer (21 years, 24 weeks), ahead of Bernhard Langer (29 years,
31 weeks) in 1986. He also made the fastest rise from amateur status to the top 100
(six weeks), top 50 (eight weeks) and top 10 (33 weeks)
• In first year as a professional, ending with NEC World Series of Golf, won $2,740,514 on the PGA TOUR ($2,946,163 worldwide) with six victories and 14 top-10 finishes in 25 events (seven victories and 19 top-10 finshes in 30 events worldwide)

AGE 22 (1998)
• Won $2,927,006 worldwide in 26 events to surpass 1997 earnings of $2,440,832
• Had 13 top-10 finishes in 20 starts on PGA TOUR, including second in Mercedes
Championships and Nissan Open, and official earnings of $1,841,117 for fourth place
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 1998 Official World
Golf Ranking
• Won - Johnnie Walker Classic (Thailand)
• Won - BellSouth Classic
• Won - PGA Grand Slam
• Qualified for United States team for Presidents Cup
• Achieved eight-stroke comeback, winning Johnnie Walker Classic after starting fourth round tied for 18th place, then scoring 65 and beating Ernie Els with birdie on second playoff hole
• Reached final of Cisco World Match Play Championship before losing 1-up to Mark O'Meara despite being 12 under par for 36 holes (record score for losing finalist)
• Won PGA Grand Slam, defeating Lee Janzen and Vijay Singh in match play
• Finished second in Nedbank Million Dollar Challenge after five-hole playoff with Nick Price
• Had current PGA TOUR record for most consecutive events without missing the cut (17). Has missed only one cut (1997 Bell Canadian Open) in 48 events since joining PGA TOUR 1996. Current record of 17 events is based on withdrawal from storm-delayed AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am
• In two years as a professional, ending with NEC World Series of Golf, won $4,561,494 on PGA TOUR ($5,300,204 worldwide) with seven victories and 26 top-10 finishes in 47 events (nine victories and 30 top-10 finishes in 55 events worldwide)

AGE 23 (1999)
• World Sportsman of the Year as chosen by the founding members of the World Sports Academy in voting for the Laureus Sports Awards
• The Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year for the second time in three years and the seventh man -- and the second golfer -- to earn the award twice since it was begun in 1931, following Byron Nelson, Don Budge, Sandy Koufax, Carl Lewis, Joe Montana and Michael Jordan, who won three times
• ESPY Male Athlete of the Year for the second time in three years and ESPY Golfer of the Decade
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR ( Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America
and Golf Writers Association of America
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.43) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $6,616,585 (most ever won in a single year). Had margin of $2,974,679 over runner-up, a figure greater than the previous single-year record. Had 81.7 percent more than David Duval, the highest percentage since Byron Nelson in 1945 (87.2 percent) and Ben Hogan in 1946 (85 percent)
• Won $7,681,625 worldwide in 25 events (100.02 percent more than runner-up)
• Had 16 top-10 finishes in 21 starts on PGA TOUR, and missed no 36-hole cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to 39 consecutive events
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 1999 Official World Golf Ranking. Achieved the highest points average (20.61) in the history of the Ranking and had the largest margin ever over his closest rival (7.46 points), leading David Duval by that amount on Nov. 7. His 750 points earned in 1999 were also a record
• Won - Buick Invitational
• Won - Deutsche Bank - SAP Open (Germany)
• Won - Memorial Tournament
• Won - Motorola Western Open
• Won - PGA Championship (fifth youngest to win at age 23 years, seven months, 16 days)
• Won - WGC NEC Invitational
• Won - National Car Rental Classic
• Won - Tour Championship
• Won - WGC American Express Championship
• Won - World Cup individual and team titles (with Mark O'Meara)
• Won - PGA Grand Slam
• Qualified for United States team for Ryder Cup Matches
• Set records for most victories by age 23 and after three years on the PGA TOUR with 15 PGA TOUR victories and 21 overall. Horton Smith had 10 victories after three years in 1929 and 15 victories in 1931 at age 23
• His eight PGA TOUR victories and 11 overall were the most in one year at such a young age since Horton Smith had eight PGA TOUR victories in 1929 at age 21
• Was the first to have as many as eight PGA TOUR victories in one year since Johnny Miller won eight in 1974
• Won four consecutive PGA TOUR events, the first to do that since Ben Hogan in 1953
• In three years as a professional, ending with WGC NEC Invitational, won $8,965,129 on PGA TOUR ($10,895,083 worldwide) with 12 victories and 40 top-10 finishes in 67 events (16 victories and 45 top-10 finishes in 81 events worldwide)
• Participated in the first network telecast of a golf event live in prime time, defeating David Duval, 2 and 1, in the Motorola Showdown at Sherwood, at Sherwood Country Club in Thousand Oaks, Calif., to win $1.1 million (including $200,000 to charity)

AGE 24 (2000)
• Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year, the first person to win the award more than once
• The Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year. He, Lance Armstrong and Michael Jordan are the only athletes to win the award three times
• ESPY Male Athlete of the Year for the third time in four years and winner of four ESPY awards for a record total of 11 career ESPY awards.
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• The Sporting News Most Powerful Person in Sports
• L'Equipe (France) World Champion of Champions
• Reuters Sportsman of the Year
• World Sportsman of the Year as chosen by the founding members of the World Sports Academy in voting for the Laureus Sports Awards
• Lowest actual scoring average (68.17), breaking Byron Nelson's record (68.33) in 1945
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (67.79) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America) and breaking the record (68.43) which Woods set in 1999
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $9,188,321 (most ever won in a single year). Had margin of $4,441,864 over runner-up Phil Mickelson (93.6 percent more than Mickelson)
• Won $11,034,530 worldwide in 25 events (82 percent more than runner-up)
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $20,503,450 ($25,024,412 worldwide)
• Had 17 top-10 finishes in 20 starts on PGA TOUR, and missed no cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to 59 consecutive events
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2000 Official World Golf Ranking. Achieved the highest points average (29.40) in the history of the Ranking and had the largest margin ever over his closest rival, leading Ernie Els by 17.75 points. His 948.22 points earned in 2000 were also a record.
• Won - Mercedes Championships
• Won - AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am
• Won - Bay Hill Invitational
• Won - Memorial Tournament
• Won - U.S. Open Championship
• Won - British Open Championship
• Won - PGA Championship
• Won - WGC NEC Invitational
• Won - Bell Canadian Open
• Won - Johnnie Walker Classic
• Won - PGA Grand Slam
• Won - World Cup (with David Duval)
• Qualified for United States team for Presidents Cup
• Was the first to have as many as nine PGA TOUR victories in one year since Sam Snead won 11 in 1950
• Extended his PGA TOUR record streak of consecutive rounds of par or better to 47 (Since second round of GTE Byron Nelson Classic, 61 rounds worldwide)
• Became the first to be under par in every event played on the PGA TOUR for an entire year
• Rallied for fifth and sixth consecutive victories, the longest PGA TOUR winning streak since Ben Hogan's six in a row in 1948. Played last three holes in 4-under par at
Mercedes Championships, then defeated Ernie Els in playoff with 40-foot birdie putt. Trailed Matt Gogel by seven strokes with seven holes to play in final round at AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, then played the last four holes in 4-under par to win by two strokes
• Became PGA TOUR's career-leading money-winner after AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am with over $12.8 million
• Became career victories leader (20) among active players on PGA TOUR by winning the U.S. Open
• Became the first ever to have won the U.S. Open, U.S. Amateur and U.S. Junior Amateur titles.
• Tied U.S. Open record with 272 total (65-69-71-67), equaling the totals of Jack Nicklaus in 1980 and Lee Janzen in 1993
• Set U.S. Open record for margin of victory (15 strokes), surpassing the 11-stroke margin by Willie Smith in 1899. Also set major championship record, surpassing the 13-stroke margin by Old Tom Morris in 1862 British Open
• Set U.S. Open records for largest leads after 36 holes (six strokes) and 54 holes (10 strokes). Also tied Henry Cotton in 1934 British Open for largest lead in a major championship after 54 holes
• Set U.S. Open record for lowest score in relation to par, 12 under par
• Became the fifth player to lead U.S. Open from start to finish without being tied at end
of any round. Had lowest score in three of the four rounds
• With British Open victory, became the fifth ever and the youngest to complete the career Grand Slam of professional major championships, following Jack Nicklaus (age 26) Gary Player (29), Gene Sarazen (33) and Ben Hogan (40)
• Became the sixth to win the U.S. Open and British Open in the same year, following Bobby Jones (1926, '30), Gene Sarazen (1932), Ben Hogan (1953), Lee Trevino (1971) and Tom Watson (1982)
• Set British Open and major championship records for the lowest score in relation to par, 19 under par, 269
• With PGA Championship victory, became the first since Ben Hogan in 1953 to win
three major championships in the same year. Hogan won the Masters, U.S. Open and
British Open
• Became the first since Denny Shute in 1936-37 to win the PGA Championship in
consecutive years
• Became the first to win the U.S. Open, British Open and PGA Championship in the sameyear
• Set PGA Championship record for the lowest score in relation to par, 18 under par, 270 (Shared with Bob May, who lost in three-hole playoff)
• In four years as a professional, ending with WGC NEC Invitational, won $19,007,950 on PGA TOUR ($21,938,114 worldwide) with 23 victories and 56 top-10 finishes in 86 events (29 victories and 74 top-10 finishes in 105 events worldwide)
• Set PGA TOUR record for lowest score after 36 holes (125 on rounds of 64 and 61) in WGC NEC Invitational
• Became the second, along with Lee Trevino in 1971, to win the U.S. Open, British Open and Canadian Open in the same year
• Participated in the second network telecast of a golf event live in prime time, losing to Sergio Garcia, 1 up, in the Lincoln Financial Group Battle at Bighorn, at Bighorn Golf Club in Palm Desert, Calif., to earn $400,000 (including $200,000 to charity)

AGE 25 (2001)
• ESPY Male Athlete of the Year for the third consecutive year, for the fourth time in five years and winner of three ESPY Awards for a record total of 14 career ESPY Awards
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• First player to win Jack Nicklaus Award (presented since 1990) for three consecutive years and four years total
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.81) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America).
• Second player (other was Greg Norman 1993-95) to win Byron Nelson Award (presented since 1980) for three consecutive years
• Third player (others were Lee Trevino, 1970-72, and Tom Watson, 1977-79) to win Vardon Trophy (presented since 1937) for three consecutive years
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $5,687,777
• Fourth player (others were Ben Hogan 1940-42, Jack Nicklaus, 1971-73, and Tom Watson, 1977-80) to be leading money-winner on PGA TOUR for three or more consecutive years
• Won $7,771,562 worldwide in 24 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $26,191,227 ($32,795,974 worldwide)
• Had nine top-10 finishes in 19 starts on PGA TOUR, and no missed cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to 78 consecutive events
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2001 Official World Golf Ranking
• Won - Bay Hill Invitational
• Won - THE PLAYERS Championship
• Won - Masters Tournament
• Won - Deutsche Bank - SAP Open
• Won - Memorial Tournament
• Won - WGC NEC Invitational
• Won - PGA Grand Slam
• Won - Willams World Challenge
• Tied for first place with amateur partner Jerry Chang in AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. Tied with Phil Mickelson and amateur Kenny G
• With Masters victory, became the first ever to hold all four professional major championships at the same time
• With Memorial victory, became the first to win the same event for three consecutive years since Tom Watson (1978-80 Byron Nelson Classic)
• With WGC NEC Invitational victory, became the fourth to win two events for three or more consecutive years, joining Walter Hagen, Gene Sarazen and Arnold Palmer. Note: Some record-keepers do not include Sarazen
• Set PGA TOUR record with 52 consecutive rounds of par or better (second round of 2000 GTE Byron Nelson Classic through first round of 2001 Phoenix Open, 66 consecutive rounds worldwide)
• Set PGA TOUR record with 35 consecutive events at par or better (stroke-play events only, all under par), from 1999 PGA Championship through 2001 Memorial Tournament
• Set record at Buick Classic with 97th consecutive week as No. 1 on the Official World Golf Ranking, surpassing Greg Norman, who had 96 consecutive weeks in 1995-97. Finished 2001 with 124 consecutive weeks
• In five years as a professional, ending with WGC NEC Invitational, won $25,989,198 on PGA TOUR ($31,035,613 worldwide) with 29 victories and 69 top-10 finishes in 106 events (38 victories and 92 top-10 finishes in 130 events worldwide)
• Participated in the third network telecast of a golf event live in prime time, teaming with Annika Sorenstam to defeat David Duval and Karrie Webb in playoff in Lincoln Financial Group Battle at Bighorn, at Bighorn Golf Club in Palm Desert, Calif., to earn $1.1 million (split with Sorenstam after $200,000 donated to charity)

AGE 26 (2002)
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• First player to win Jack Nicklaus Award (presented since 1990) for four consecutive years and five years total
• Second player to win PGA of America Award for four consecutive years (other was Tom Watson 1977-80)
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.56) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
• First player to win Byron Nelson Award and Vardon Trophy for four consecutive years
• First player to win PGA of America Player of the Year and Vardon Trophy in the same year for four consecutive years
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $6,912,625
• Second player to be leading money-winner on PGA TOUR for four consecutive years (other was Tom Watson 1977-80)
• Won $8,417,188 worldwide in 24 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $33,103,852
• Had 13 top-10 finishes in 18 starts on PGA TOUR, and missed no cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to 96 consecutive events
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2002 Official World Golf Ranking
• Finished 2002 with 176 consecutive weeks as the No. 1 player on the Official World Golf Ranking
• Won - Bay Hill Invitational
• Won - Masters Tournament
• Won - Deutsche Bank - SAP Open
• Won - U.S. Open Championship
• Won - Buick Open
• Won - WGC American Express Championship
• Won - PGA Grand Slam
• Qualified for United States team for Ryder Cup Matches
• With Bay Hill victory, became the first to win three different events for three or more consecutive years
• Became the first ever to have won two or more titles each in the U.S. Open, U.S. Amateur and U.S. Junior Amateur. (Earlier in 2000, became the first ever to have won all three of those championships)
• Became the first ever to lead the U.S. Open twice (also in 2000) from start to finish without being tied at the end of any round. Four other players had done so once, Walter Hagen (1914), Jim Barnes (1921), Ben Hogan (1953) and Tony Jacklin (1970)
• Became the sixth to win the Masters and U.S. Open in the same year, following Craig Wood (1941), Ben Hogan (1951, '53), Arnold Palmer (1960) and Jack Nicklaus (1972)
• Participated in a network telecast of a golf event live in prime time, teaming with Jack Nicklaus to defeat Lee Trevino and Sergio Garcia, 2 and 1, in Lincoln Financial Group Battle at Bighorn, at Bighorn Golf Club in Palm Desert, California, to earn $1.2 million (split with Nicklaus after $200,000 donated to charity)

AGE 27 (2003)
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America. First player to win awards for five consecutive years.
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.41) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
• First player to win Byron Nelson Award and Vardon Trophy for five consecutive years
• First player to win PGA of America Player of the Year and Vardon Trophy in the same year for five consecutive years
• Won $6,673,413 on PGA TOUR
• Won $7,400,288 worldwide in 20 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $39,777,265
• Had 12 top-10 finishes in 18 starts on PGA TOUR, and missed no cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to a record 114 consecutive events, breaking the record of 113 consecutive events set by Byron Nelson in the 1940s
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2003 Official World Golf Ranking
• Finished 2003 with 299 total weeks as the No. 1 player on the Official World Golf Ranking (record is 331 weeks by Greg Norman)
• Finished 2003 with a record 229 consecutive weeks as the No. 1 player on the Official World Golf Ranking (Since Aug. 15, 1999)
• Won - Buick Invitational
• Won - WGC Accenture Match Play
• Won - Bay Hill Invitational
• Won - Western Open
• Won - WGC American Express Championship
• Qualified for United States team for Presidents Cup
• With Bay Hill victory, tied PGA TOUR record for the most consecutive victories in a single event with four consecutive victories
• First player to win at least five events on PGA TOUR every year for five consecutive years
• Participated in a network telecast of a golf event live in prime time for the fifth year, teaming with Ernie Els to lose to Sergio Garcia and Phil Michelson, 3 and 1, in Lincoln Financial Group Battle at the Bridges in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif., to earn $500,000 (split with Els after $100,000 donated to charity)

AGE 28 (2004)
• Won - WGC Accenture Match Play
• Won - Dunlop Phoenix
• Won - Target World Challenge
• Qualified for United States team for Ryder Cup Matches
• Won $5,365,472 on PGA TOUR
• Won $7,379,407 worldwide in 23 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $45,142,737
• Had 14 Top-10 finishes in 19 starts on PGA TOUR, and missed no cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to a record 133 consecutive events (Previous record was 113 events by Byron Nelson in the 1940s)
• Set record with 264 consecutive weeks as No. 1 on the Official World Golf Ranking, from the list of Aug. 15, 1999, through the list of Aug. 29, 2004 (Previous record was 96 consecutive weeks by Greg Norman in 1995-1997)
• Set record with 334 total weeks as No. 1 on the Official World Golf Ranking, through the list of Aug. 29, 2004 (Previous record was 331 weeks by Greg Norman)
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2004 Official World Golf Ranking
• Participated in a network telecast of a golf event live in prime time for the sixth year, teaming with Hank Kuehne to defeat Phil Mickelson and John Daly, 2 and 1, in Lincoln Financial Group Battle of the Bridges at Rancho Santa Fe in Rancho Santa Fe, California, to earn $500,000 (Split with Kuehne after $100,000 donated to charity)

AGE 29 (2005)
• Player of the Year as selected by the PGA (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.66) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
• First player to win PGA of America Player of the Year for seven years ( Tom Watson won six, Jack Nicklaus, five, and Ben Hogan, four) and Vardon Trophy for six years (Billy Casper and Lee Trevino won five each)
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR ( Arnold Palmer Award) with $10,628,024
• Won $12,158,439 worldwide in 26 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $55,770,760

AGE 30 (2006)
• Won Buick Invitational
• Won Dubai Desert Classic
• Won Ford Championship
• Won British Open Championship
• Won Buick Open
• Won PGA Championship
• Won WGC Bridgestone
• Won Deutsche Bank Championship
• Won WGC American Express
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $9,941,563
• Won $13,025,558 worldwide in 17 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $65,712,324
• Had 11 top-10 finishes in 15 starts on PGA TOUR
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2006 Official World Golf Ranking
• Qualified for United States team for Ryder Cup Matches

AGE 31 (2007)
• Won Buick Invitational
• Won WGC CA Championship
• Won Wachovia Championship
• Won WGC Bridgestone
• Won PGA Championship
• Won BMW Championship
• Won Tour Championship
• Won Target World Challenge
• As founder of the Tiger Woods Foundation, honored by Golf Writers Association of America "for unselfish contributions to the betterment of society"
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America
• Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $10,867,052
• Won $12,352,706 worldwide in 17 events
• Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $76,579,376
• Had 12 top-10 finishes in 15 starts on PGA TOUR
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (67-79), equaling record which Woods set in 2000 for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
• Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2007 Official World Golf Ranking
• Qualified for United States team for Presidents Cup

AGE 32 (2008)
• Won Buick Invitational
• Won Dubai Desert Classic
• Won WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship
• Won Arnold Palmer Invitational
• Won U.S. Open Championship
• Won four of six PGA TOUR starts, including the U.S. Open, before season-ending knee surgery in June
• Won fourth consecutive Buick Invitational at Torrey Pines
• Second time he has won an event four years in a row, also winning the Arnold Palmer Invitational from 2000-03
• Won at Bay Hill for the fifth time in his career, becoming the first player in PGA TOUR history to win four tournaments at least five times
• Tied Arnold Palmer (62 victories) with his first win of the year, and ended his season one ahead of Ben Hogan (65-64) for third place all-time
• Captured five consecutive TOUR events over two seasons
• In his first start two months after surgery, parred the first hole of sudden death (91 holes) to defeat Rocco Mediate and win the U.S. Open. Sank a 12-foot birdie putt on the 72nd hole to force an 18-hole playoff
• U.S. Open win made him 14-14 in majors when holding the third-round lead
• June 16 Official World Golf Ranking marked his 500th week atop the Ranking
• Unable to compete due to injury for United States Team for Ryder Cup Matches

AGE 33 (2009)
• Won Arnold Palmer Invitational
• Win at Arnold Palmer was his sixth victory in the event.
• At AP, rallied from five shots back the final day to tie his best PGA TOUR comeback mark (2000 AT&T Pebble Beach)
• Sank winning birdie on the final hole for the second consecutive year at Bay Hill, the third time overall
• Returned to the winner's circle after 286 days
• Was 10-under-par after 70 holes at the Masters before finishing T6
• Won Memorial Tournament
• Win at the Memorial Tournament was his fourth victory in the event
• At Memorial, rallied from four shots back the final day. Final round included birdies on the last two holes for a one-stroke victory
• Was 14 of 14 in fairways hit Sunday at Memorial and 49 of 56 during the week, equaling the best mark of his professional career (1998 Masters)
• Won AT&T National
• Win at the AT&T National marks the 25th different official PGA TOUR event he has won
• Became just the second player to win an official PGA TOUR event as host. Jack Nicklaus won the Memorial Tournament as host in 1977 and '84.
• Victory was his 90th professional career win
• Won Buick Open
• Captured the event for the third time (2002, '06, '09), joining Vijay Singh as the only three-time winners of the tournament
• Started the second round at No. 10 and went birdie-birdie-eagle-birdie-birdie for 6-under after five holes (Nos. 10-14), his best opening five-hole stretch
• Had his largest opening-round comeback on the leaderboard after starting tied for 95th, 1-under 71
• Has now won four or more tournaments in 11 of 14 seasons on tour
• Won WGC-Bridgestone Invitational
• 70th victory on the PGA TOUR
• Captured the event for the seventh time and became the first PGA TOUR player to win a tournament seven times on the same golf course (Firestone Country Club's South Course)
• Fourth consecutive win at Bridgestone Invitational (2005-'07, '09; missed 2008 due to knee surgery)
• Was his 160th top-10 finish on the PGA TOUR
• 27th top-10 finish in 30 GC events
• Won the Notah Begay III Foundation Challenge (nine of 18 skins and $230,000)
• Won BMW Championship
• 71st victory on the PGA TOUR
• Fifth tournament he has won at least five times
• Tenth time he has won a PGA TOUR event by eight or more strokes
• Has won six or more tournaments in six seasons on tour
• Posted a Cog Hill Golf & Country Club record 9-under 62 in the third round, one stroke shy of his best 18-hole score on tour, en route to victory
• Tied Walter Hagen with a tournament-record five wins at the event (1997, '99, 2003, '07, '09)
• Won the FedExCup, a season-long points competition on the PGA TOUR (clinched title with a second-place finish at THE TOUR Championship)
• Member of the victorious U.S. Presidents Cup team. Clinched the American victory with a 6 and 5 win over Y.E. Yang. First time in either The Presidents Cup or Ryder Cup that Woods earned the decisive point.
• Woods went 5-0 for the week, joining Mark O'Meara and Shigeki Maruyama as the only players to win all five matches in The Presidents Cup. Woods' 18 victories are the most by any player in the event. Joined Steve Stricker to become the first partnership in the tournament to win all four of their matches
• Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.05) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
• Leading money winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $10,508,163
• Won the JBWere Masters at Kingston Heath Golf Club in Melbourne, Australia, for his first victory in that country
• Was inducted into the Stanford Athletics Hall of Fame and served as honorary captain at the Big Game against California
• Selected AP Athlete of the Decade. Woods received 56 of 142 votes cast by AP editors throughout the country
• Player of the Year as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America and Golf Writers Association of America for the 10th time
• Announced on Dec. 11 that he would take an indefinite break from professional golf to deal with personal matters

AGE 34 (2010)
• Finished tied for fourth at the Masters in his first event in 2010 after a 144-day hiatus from competitive golf
• Tied the Masters' record with four eagles in one tournament (Rd. 1, Nos. 8 and 15; Rd. 4, Nos. 7 and 15)
• Forced to withdraw from THE PLAYERS Championship (fourth round, hole No. 7) with what was later diagnosed as an inflamed facet joint in his neck
• Recorded eight birdies (his most sub-par scores in one round at the tournament, breaking his previous mark of six) and scored a 66 in the third round of the U.S. Open
• Entered the FedExCup Playoffs 112th out of 125 players that qualified and finished tied for 12th at The Barclays to qualify for the Deutsche Bank Championship
• Finished tied for 11th at the Deutsche Bank Championship to advance to the BMW Championship
• Finished tied for 15th at the BMW Championship but failed the qualify for the season-ending TOUR Championship (42nd place in FedExCup standings)
• Fell to second in the Official World Golf Rankings to Lee Westwood (Nov. 1) after 281 consecutive weeks in the top spot and 623 weeks total
• Went winless for the first time in his 15-year PGA TOUR career
• Was 6-under par the last six holes -- including two eagles -- at the JBWere Masters. His final-round 65 earned him a fourth-place finish, three strokes behind the winner
• Lost in a one-hole playoff to Graeme McDowell at the Chevron World Challenge

AGE 35 (2011)
• Posted a final-round 6-under 66 to finish tied for 10th at the WGC-Cadillac Championship, the 11th time in as many starts that he has finished with a top-10 finish. He has also finished inside the top 10 in all eight starts at the TPC Blue Monster at Doral.
• Finished tied for fourth at the Masters, including rounds of 66 (second) and 67 (fourth). Scored a pair of 5-under-par 31s on the back nine during the second round and on the front nine during the final round.
• At Augusta, began the last day tied for ninth with a seven-shot deficit but rallied to share the lead after his first nine holes.
• Seventh consecutive year finishing sixth or better at the Masters.
• Forced to withdraw from THE PLAYERS Championship after nine holes Thursday after reinjuring his left leg.
• Missed both the U.S. Open and British Open with left leg injuries.
• Returned to action at the WGC Bridgestone Invitational (Aug. 4) after not having competed since THE PLAYERS (May 12).
• Missed the cut at the PGA Championship (77-73 -- 150), marking the first time he has failed to make the cut in the event.
• Played in the Frys.com Open, finishing the event with three consecutive 68s.
• Led after the second round of the Emirates Australian Open and finished third, two strokes behind the winner.
• Defeated Aaron Baddeley, 4 and 3, to score the winning point in the U.S. Team's 19-15 win at The Presidents Cup at Royal Melbourne in Australia.
• Birdied hole Nos. 17 (15 feet) and 18 (six feet) to win the Chevron World Challenge by one stroke over Zach Johnson. It was his first victory in more than two years (26 tournaments, 749 days) and his fifth win in the event. The victory moved him to No. 21 in the OWGR.

AGE 36 (2012)
• Finished tied for third at the Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship, including a third-round 66, in the opening event of the year. Tied for the lead with eventual winner Robert Rock after 54 holes.
• Finished tied for second in his first appearance at The Honda Classic. Second-place showing included a final-round, 8-under-par 62, Woods' lowest final-round score in his PGA TOUR career. Final bogey-free 18 holes boasted two eagles and four birdies.
• Forced to withdraw from the WGC-Cadillac Championship after his tee shot at No. 12 on Sunday.
• Later diagnosed as a mild strain of the left Achilles tendon.
• Captured his seventh Arnold Palmer Invitational. Victory was his first full-field PGA TOUR win in 30 months (2009 BMW Championship). It was his 72nd on tour, one short of tying Jack Nicklaus (73) for second place. Started the day one stroke ahead of McDowell and defeated him by five.
• Captured the Memorial Tournament for the fifth time, scoring a 67 that equaled the low round the last day.
• Won the Arnold Palmer Invitational and the Memorial Tournament in the same season for the fourth time in his career. Has won six tournaments at least five times. Come-from-behind win was aided by three birdies on the final four holes, including a holed flop shot from 49 feet, 10 inches on the par-3 No. 16 that Jack Nicklaus said, "I don't think under the circumstances I've ever seen a better shot." Victory tied him with Nicklaus with 73 all-time PGA TOUR victories, trailing only Sam Snead (82).
• Was tied with Jim Furyk and David Toms for the second round lead (1-under 139) at the U.S. Open at the Olympic Club. Finished the tournament tied for 21st, six strokes behind winner Webb Simpson.
• Moved into sole possession of second place on the PGA TOUR's all-time wins list by claiming his 74th career victory at the AT&T National, where he served as tournament host.
• Earned his 74th career PGA TOUR victory at the age of 36 years, 6 months and 2 days in his 285th (271st professional) start on tour. Surpassed Jack Nicklaus for second on the all-time PGA TOUR win total, trailing only Sam Snead (82).
• Has now won 74 out of 271 (27.3 percent) professional starts on the PGA TOUR.
• Earned his 23rd come-from-behind victory in the final round on the PGA TOUR.
• Moved to No. 1 on the FedExCup points total, the first time he held the No. 1 spot in 100 weeks.
• Finished tied for third, four back of winner Ernie Els, at the British Open after opening rounds of 67-67.
• Tied for the 36-hole lead at the PGA Championship before finishing tied for 11th.
• Third-place finish at the Deutsche Bank Championship, and subsequent winnings ($544,000), pushed Woods over the $100 million mark in career earnings on the PGA TOUR ($100,350,700).
• A T4 finish at the BMW Championship moved him to No. 2 in the Official World Golf Ranking.
• Tied for eighth at the TOUR Championship to finish the FedExCup playoffs in third place.
• Finished in third place at the Turkish Airlines World Golf Final. Went 2-1 in group play, defeating Matt Kuchar and Rory McIlroy, before falling to Justin Rose by one stroke in the semifinals.

AGE 37 (2013)
• Captured the 2013 Farmers Insurance Open for his 75th PGA TOUR victory.
• Seventh PGA TOUR win at Torrey Pines, and his eighth there overall (2008 U.S. Open)
• Led after 36 and 54 holes winning the event by four strokes in a darkness-and-weather-delayed Monday finish.
• Won the 2013 WGC-Cadillac Championship. Win marked his 76th PGA TOUR triumph and his 17th in WGC events.
• Led the tournament wire-to-wire (tied in the first round).
• Defeated friend Steve Stricker by two strokes after the runner-up worked with Woods on the putting green Wednesday.
• Set personal records for most birdies in two (17) and three (24) rounds and number of putts (100) in four rounds.
• It was the 22nd time Woods had taken at least a three-shot lead into the final round on TOUR, and he has won them all.
• Captured the 2013 Arnold Palmer Invitational by two strokes over Justin Rose. Victory was his 77th on the PGA TOUR, his second straight at the API and eighth overall in the event. Grand total tied the PGA TOUR record held by Sam Snead for the most wins at a single event.
• Victory propelled him to No. 1 in the Official World Golf Ranking, ahead of Rory McIlroy, and for the first time since October 2010. At one point he was ranked as low as No. 58 in the world. The move to No. 1 marked his 624th week in that position.
• Ended T4 at the Masters marking his eighth top 10 finish at Augusta National in the last nine years.
• Captured THE PLAYERS Championship for the second time (2001) for his 78th career PGA TOUR win. Snead, with 82 TOUR wins, had his 78th victory at age 46.
• It was quickest Woods had reached four victories in one year. Title came in his 300th start, and he also won on his 100th and 200th attempt. Has won 78 out of 286 (27 percent) professional starts on the PGA TOUR.
• Captured his 79th PGA TOUR title at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, placing him just three shy of tying Sam Snead's mark.
• Scored a course-record tying 61 in the second round at WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, equaling the low 18-hole score of his career. Two-day total 127 (66-61) provided a seven-stroke 36-hole lead which also equaled a career mark.
• Eighth win at Bridgestone equaled his mark at the Arnold Palmer Invitational and is tied with Sam Snead for most titles in a single event.
• Tied his own record for most wins on the same golf course, also with eight at Torrey Pines and Bay Hill.
• Earned his 18th WGC title in 42 attempts.

stockbox

Tiger is a great player, however here is a clear example of awarding him something he did not earn. No Majors should mean no award. I am tired of the PGA catering and bowing down to this rude and arrogant person all because he brings in the advertisers dollars. Shame on those that voted this way, other golfers were more worthy.

Thanks JT.

twoputtbob

I'm sorry, but this choice is just wrong. A British Open and two other victories trump, five tour victories. Come on, Phil deserved this one.

jmbrown5052

WTG TIGER !!!! don't listen to the narrow minded people who think you don't deserve it...You deserve the title

Lwelfling

PGA Voters-- How much money did Tiger give you in order to win this award? At least I hope this is not the case. Worst choice EVER! I thought the game of golf was founded on Morals and Values! World ranking should not guarantee POY! I cannot believe it. Just am shocked! SHAME!

staneb

There was never a doubt after the tour Championship who would and should win this award. His peers know it and anybody with an ounce of golf knowledge knows it. In 1996 I thought by 2013 something would have changed (and it has for most), but for those with petty minds and hearts, they will never change. I feel nothing but gratitude to have been alive to see Jack and Tiger in my lifetime. These people come along usuually once in a lifetime. I am particularly taken aback by the post that says about Tiger "he only does what he is suppose to do". Are you kidding me? And by the way while you keep celebrating that tiger hasnt won a major in 5 years, please note he is exactly where Jack was at this point in his career with 14 majors. So keep listning to your favorite hater commentators and looking for "the next TIger". And miss out on what this player has done and is doing. I feel sorry for you. Congrats toTiger and Jordan. Your peers have spoken. And Jordan if you are able to accomplish just half of what Tiger has, the future of golf is bright.

brobinson_2

Once again, I am blown away by this decision. Hasn't won a major since 2008? So many other players should have been chosen for this distinguished award but it seems the award is decreasing in its value- The PGA has stated in the past that Tiger brings in the money for the tour - well, okay, let's give him the "tour money maker of the year" award and let it go at that Shame on the voters who made this decision.

davidlee1053

Surprise! Surprise!...and whoop-dee-do.
Not to take anything away from Tiger`s accomplishments. But, really? The guy does what he`s expected to do (with the exception, I guess, of what his whole life is about..winning Majors).
JORDAN SPIETH: Rookie of The Year, Player of the Year (in my book). A year ago this kid had NO status (as I understand it) on the PGA Tour. Now he has a win, 9 top ten finishes with 4 top 5`s. 10 Sunday rounds in the 60`s. 10th on the money list. Tiger: played only 16 times (he only plays Majors, Jack and Arnie`s tournaments, and the big money events). Look to the Leaderboard on Friday night to see where Tiger will most likely finish. Only 2 Sunday rounds in the 60`s. Has more excuses and excuse-makers in his corner than John Daly could dream of.
Of course, we shouldn`t be too surprised. The voting is open only to those who stand in awe of Tiger (the Tiger of 10 years ago) whenever he shows up to collect a paycheck.
I hope Tiger continues to do well. He can be exciting to watch on those days when he makes up his mind to "bring his A game". But, I`m watching Spieth a bit more. I think he is the real deal.

wvtiger

Good job, PGA. Wise choice.