A timeline of the PGA Tour's drug-testing policy

Tim Finchem
Getty Images
Will PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem take action against Vijay Singh for his use of a banned substance?
PGA.com

Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Thursday, January 31, 2013 | 9:30 a.m.

In light of what's happened this week with World Golf Hall of Famer Vijay Singh admitting to the use of a banned substance in a Sports Illustrated article, GolfChannel.com has put together a helpful, informative timeline of the PGA Tour's drug-testing policy.

Late adopters of an anti-doping/drug-testing policy, the PGA Tour on July 1, 2008, officially began its testing at the AT&T National. The European Tour followed suit that same week at the European Open (Click here for a look at the PGA Tour's anti-doping policy).

When the testing began -- two weeks after the epic U.S. Open playoff between Rocco Mediate and Tiger Woods at Torrey Pines -- Mediate did an interview with ESPN.com and called the new process, "the biggest joke in the history of the world."

Well, it's clearly a joke no longer.

It's not known what action -- if any -- the PGA Tour will take against Singh. At the time of this blog post, Singh was still scheduled to tee off in the first round of the Waste Management Phoenix Open. If he does in fact play, it will be interesting to see the reception he gets on the par-3 16th hole at TPC Scottsdale -- the rowdiest in golf.

(UPDATE: SINGH HAS WITHDRAWN FROM THE WASTE MANAGEMENT PHOENIX OPEN CITING A BACK INJURY)

Doug Barron, a journeyman in the professional golf ranks, was the first player suspended under the PGA Tour's anti-doping policy. He was suspended for one year after a random test at the St. Jude Classic in 2009, where he tested positive for high levels of testosterone.

Shortly after, Golf.com's Cameron Morfit wrote:

Barron was diagnosed in 1987 with mitral-valve prolapse, a heart murmur that led to tightness in his chest and made him feel like he was having a heart attack. Only 18, he was put on the beta-blocker Propranolol to treat the murmur and alleviate anxiety attacks brought on by the condition. He was diagnosed with low testosterone in 2005 and began taking testosterone injections.

While players can take banned substances if they are medically necessary, the Tour never granted Barron a therapeutic-use exemption (TUE) for either drug.

Barron has since been granted the therapeutic-use exemption.

Time will tell what the fate of three-time major champion and former world No. 1 Singh will be.

Follow T.J. Auclair on Twitter, @tj_auclair.

PGA.com