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Rory McIlroy and Bubba Watson had nearly identical lies at the 18th -- and both made huge par-savers.

If you just happened to look at the scorecard, pars for Bubba Watson and Rory McIlroy at the 18th hole Saturday at Riviera Country Club doesn't seem like that much of a deal.

But what pars they were.

Both players missed the 18th green on their approach shots, leaving themselves almost identical shots, short-siding the hole in a low area next to the grandstand. With the green sloping quickly away, just getting the ball on the green and taking a two-putt bogey seemed likely. But these are two of the best players in the world -- and with good reason.

Watch this shot by Watson, who was clinging to a one-stroke lead at the time.

 

 

McIlroy was several groups in front of Watson when his approach went awry. His recovery nearly hit the flagstick, but rolled several feet by, leaving him with this tricky par-saver.

 

 

That puts McIlroy just two shots behind Watson heading into Sunday's final round.

Just a couple of outstanding pars that don't look that impressive on the scorecard.

 

Bubba Watson, Rory McIlroy make magic Saturday at Riviera's 18th
PGA Tour/YouTube
James Hahn was left with this 61-footer for birdie at No. 3 Thursday.

James Hahn won the 2015 Northern Trust Open, so he knows his way around Riviera Country Club. Even so, when you leave yourself a 61-foot birdie putt, the odds of making it seems pretty far-fetched.

Most amateurs would love to cozy it close and walk off with a two-putt par. But Hahn is no amateur. Watch what he does with this huge right-to-left breaker at the par-3, fourth hole in Thursday's first round.

 

 

To quote another famous Han -- Han Solo -- "Never tell me the odds!"

WATCH: James Hahn sinks 61-footer for birdie
Bubba Watson
USA Today Sports Images
Bubba Watson might be hearing a lot more from son Caleb if Justin Bieber's drum tips pay off.
 
Bubba Watson is out in Los Angeles this week for the Northern Trust Open at Riviera, and he's taken some time to see some sights. Earlier this week, he dropped by the set of "2 Broke Girls" and met the cast of "Girl Meets World." 
 
He also got Justin Bieber to show his young son Caleb around a drum set. Nice!
 
SPEAKING OF GOLF BOYS VIDEOS: Oh Oh Oh | Golf Boys 2.Oh
 
Bubba has long been a "Belieber." He and Bieber have apparently been friends for a few years and, after he won the Masters last year, he told TMZ Sports that he'd love to get the Beebs to sign on as the fifth member of the Golf Boys.
 
"Obviously I love Justin Bieber, so I'm trying to get him to join the band," he said, "but he's not doing it right now."
 
Well, maybe this little musical interlude will get the golf ball rolling toward a third Golf Boys video – and the first with a special guest star. The worlds of golf and music can only hope.
 
 
Justin Bieber gives Bubba Watson's son Caleb a drumming lesson
Vintage clubs at Northern Trust Open
PGA Tour via YouTube
Players like Rory McIlroy, Stuart Appleby, Anirban Lahiri, Kevin Na, Charley Hoffman and Jamie Donaldson took a few whacks with some classic old clubs at Riviera.
 
The PGA Tour event now known as the Northern Trust Open is marking its 90th anniversary this year and, to celebrate the occasion, a handful of players stopped by the range to hit some vintage golf clubs from various eras.
 
Being the old man of the PGA.com staff, I used persimmon woods when I first started out, and to this day I believe they feel better your hand than any metal club could ever feel. I've also hit a few hickory clubs over the years, and to this day I believe they feel … well, interesting.
 
So anyway, it was fun to see the reactions of players like Rory McIlroy, Stuart Appleby, Anirban Lahiri, Kevin Na, Charley Hoffman and Jamie Donaldson as they took a few whacks with these classic old clubs. The rapid advances in technology over the past couple of decades means that, as McIlroy said, even the clubs from the 1990s are like antiques to him.
 
 
It's too bad the video crew didn't have access to ShotTracker or a Trackman so we could get a definitive view of how far – or short – the balls were flying off these classic sticks. But you could get a pretty good idea based on the players' faces as they watched the balls in flight.
 
For the record, the tournament – created as the Los Angeles Open – was first played in 1926. The total purse that year was $10,000 – at the time the largest prize in golf – and the inaugural champion was "Lighthorse" Harry Cooper. No doubt even the oldest of the clubs being swung today would have felt pretty good to him.
 
Take a look:
 
 
PGA Tour players hit vintage clubs to mark history at Northern Trust
Dustin Johnson
USA Today Sports Images
Dustin Johnson is deadly accurate with a wedge in his hand, as he proved again on Monday.
 
One big difference between most PGA Tour-calber players and the rest of us is their impeccable distance control. From just about any spot on the golf course, they can hit just about any other spot on the golf course.
 
And while we know Dustin Johnson primarily for his prodigious tee shots – he's averaging 313 yards per tee shot this season – he is also a master with a wedge in his hand. He proved it just yesterday during a test session with the folks from TaylorMade at MountainGate Golf Club near Santa Monica.
 
Standing out in a fairway, he was aiming at a pin up on the green when someone off-camera yelled at him, "Hey DJ, aim for the camera" – meaning the cameraman lying on the ground just off the back edge of the putting surface.
 
 
DJ cut loose, and his ball arced toward its target. It hit with a thump a few feet from the flagstick – and hopped to within a millimeter of the camera before backing up a bit. Amazingly, the cameraman doesn't flinch when the ball suddenly fills his lens. 
 
We'd love to see the footage from the ground-level camera, but the video below provides a fantastic view of just how close to the camera that ball came. Take a look – and appreciate what an amazing shot that was. 
 
DJ, by the way, will be in action again this week at the Northern Trust Open at Riviera – cameramen, you have been notified!
 
 
Dustin Johnson has amazing wedge control – just ask this cameraman
Happy Gilmore
Courtesy of Happy Madison Productions
Adam Sandler's running swing in "Happy Gilmore" has spawned a million imitations, some much better than others.
 
Hard to believe, but "Happy Gilmore" was released 20 years ago today. In the film – which many call the funniest golf movie ever, with "Caddyshack" being the other half of that debate – Adam Sandler plays a down-and-out hockey player who tries his hand at golf to win enough money to save his grandmother's house.
 
Aside from the wisecracks – and an evil Bob Barker – what we mostly remember from the film is Happy's trademark running swing at the golf ball. Golfers everywhere have tried that move with varying degrees of success over the years and, to tip our cap to "Happy Gilmore," here is a collection of some of the most memorable of those attempts.
 
We'll start off with world No. 1 Jordan Spieth at the Grapefruit Pro-Am in Florida, courtesy of Spieth's buddy and country music star Jake Owen:
 
 
Next up is up-and-coming PGA Tour player John Peterson, who took his cut at the CIMB Classic in Malaysia last fall – and shot a 66! That earned him some serious respect from his fellow players, and rightly so:
 

 
Pro golfers aren't the only "Happy Gilmore" fans. Washington Nationals' star outfielder Bryce Harper obviously loves the guy as well, as he tried the big swing before Spring Training last winter – and cracked a prodigious drive.
 
 
The best we've ever seen is Padraig Harrington, who whaled away at the 2013 PGA Grand Slam of Golf. Check out his form:
 
 
U.S. soccer star Sydney Leroux didn't fare quite so well:
 
 
Several of the world's best players took a crack at it in their preparation for the 2013 British Open. We don't know that it helped:
 
 
And finally, just to refresh your memory, here is the original, revealed to us 20 years ago today. Happy anniversary to "Happy Gilmore!"
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
For 20th anniversary of "Happy Gilmore," here's a collection of Happy Gilmore swings
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