Phil Mickelson
Phil Mickelson prepares to hit a shot from the grandstand next to the fifth hole Friday at The Barclays.

It was Oscar Wilde who famously wrote the phrase "life imitates art." He certainly had to have been referring to Phil Mickelson, who always seems to be one shot away from needing to pull off a scene from a sequel to "Tin Cup" or "Happy Gilmore."

Friday's second round of The Barclays was a perfect example. Mickelson hit his tee shot on the par-4 fifth hole well left, and then got an unfortunate bounce when his ball ricocheted into the grandstand.

Ninety-nine percent of the field would have surveyed the situation and taken a drop. But Phil being Phil, that's all the more reason to do something extraordinary (or take a page right out of Hollywood) or foolish.

Besides, how often do you get a perfect lie on all-weather carpet and a clear shot to the green over a row of chairs and a beer bottle? Just watch.

Unfortunately, real life doesn't always mirror Hollywood. If it had, Mickelson's ball would have gone in the hole, or at least landed on the green. Instead, he failed to get up and down from the bunker and had to settle for bogey.

But for the crowd in the grandstand, it may have been the most exciting bogey of the day.

And unbelievably, Mickelson did it AGAIN on Saturday morning. Except this time he made par, mainly because he had already practiced the shot 24 hours before!

 

 

You truly can't make this stuff up, folks. Talk about your flair for the dramatic. 

Watch: Phil's TWO grandstand plays at The Barclays
Rickie Fowler in New York City
Rickie Fowler sure knows how to visit New York City in style.

With the PGA Tour making a stop this weekend in Paramus, N.J., golfers have been dropping clues all over social media on the proper way to visit New York. We've scoured all the sites and have come up with five steps on how to visit the Big Apple like a PGA Tour professional.  

Step 1: Grab a bite to eat

New York is home to some of the best restaurants in the world. The Big Apple has you covered no matter what type of food you want, and at virtually any hour of the day. If you're like Russell Knox, you go for what may be the biggest slice of pizza in history.

 

 

Step 2: Go see the sights

There are plenty of marquee landmarks in New York. Everything -- from Coney Island in Brooklyn to Central Park in Manhattan -- is just a subway ride away. If you're like Rickie Fowler, you'll stop at the Empire State Building and get a great view of the city.

 

Step 3: Go for a run

After eating such a large meal earlier in the day, you may worry about gaining a few pounds -- especially if you want to play your best on the course. But fear not, there are plenty of parks in New York where you can work off those extra calories. Best part, you never know if Rory McIlroy will join you for your jaunt. 

 

 

Step 4: Go to a professional sporting event

There are multiple nightime options when visiting New York, but one of the more popular ones is to catch a game. The New York sports scene has you covered every time of the year, though going to see the Jets or Giants play does require a quick trip into New Jersey. Even if you're not a fan of the team or sport you're at, it's still a great experience. 

 

 

Step 5: Guest star on a late night talk show

This one is reserved for all you big stars. New York is home to a number of late-night talk show hosts. One of the more popular options recently has been the "Tonight Show" with Jimmy Fallon. 

 

 

Complete these five steps and you'll have visited New York like a true PGA Tour professional. 

Of course, this list is assuming you have some free time and don't have to get up early for a round of golf. If you find yourself in that case, Ian Poulter has one suggestion for you. 

 

 

Visit the Big Apple: Five tips from the Tour pros
August 22, 2014 - 2:53pm
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
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Cheyenne Woods
Instagram
Like her Uncle Tiger Woods, Cheyenne Woods sure is talented when it comes to juggling a golf ball.

This isn't the first time Cheyenne Woods has recreated the famous Nike golf ball-juggling commercial starring her uncle, Tiger Woods.

But this time it was a lot cleaner, scoring a "10" from all the judges (OK, we made that part up).

Here's the clip Cheyenne posted on her Instagram account yesterday:

That's some talent. I particularly enjoyed the bump off the top of the golf grip.

Cheyenne, 24, won the Volvik RACV Ladies Masters on the European Ladies Tour back in February.

Here's a look back at the video she posted last November, similar to the latest effort:

And, as a refresher, here's Tiger's actual commercial:

Cheyenne Woods, again, recreates Uncle Tiger's famous juggling commercial
August 22, 2014 - 1:09pm
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
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Seung-Yul Noh
PGA Tour
If you hit your ball off the wrong green it's a two-shot penalty. Seung-Yul Noh learned that on Friday at the Barclays.

Oops.

That's what Korea's Seung-Yul Noh must have been thinking after making a costly mistake in the second round of the Barclays on Friday.

Playing the 11th hole, Noh hit a tee shot way to the right. So far right that it came to rest in the middle of the adjacent third green.

That's where Noh made a big mistake moments later. Rather than taking relief without penalty with his ball lying on the wrong green (USGA Rule 25-3), Noh elected to hit the shot from the green as superintendents everywhere probably cringed.

RELATED: Barclays leaderboard | Five players to watch at Barclays | 2014-15 Tour schedule

As you'll see in the video below, Noh took a healthy divot out of the green too.

Because he hit the shot, Noh was assessed a two-shot penalty and wound up making a triple-bogey 7 on the hole.

 

It truly was a round-killer. Noh was 4 under for the day to that point, but that triple bogey, followed by bogeys on Nos. 16 and 17 led to a 1-over 72.

Here is how the official rule reads:

25-3. Wrong Putting Green
a. Interference
Interference by a wrong putting green occurs when a ball is on the wrong putting green.

Interference to a player's stance or the area of his intended swing is not, of itself, interference under this Rule.

b. Relief
If a player's ball lies on a wrong putting green, he must not play the ball as it lies. He must take relief, without penalty, as follows:

The player must lift the ball and drop it within one club-length of and not nearer the hole than the nearest point of relief. The nearest point of relief must not be in a hazard or on a putting green. When dropping the ball within one club-length of the nearest point of relief, the ball must first strike a part of the course at a spot that avoids interference by the wrong putting green and is not in a hazard and not on a putting green. The ball may be cleaned when lifted under this Rule.

The penalty for breaching this rule is loss of hole in match play and a two-stroke penalty in stroke play.

Here's to hoping nobody has to putt through that divot. 

Noh penalized for hitting ball off wrong green
August 22, 2014 - 11:58am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Flaming golf ball
Vine
This is the ultimate in "golf trick-shot gone wrong."

We're fond of a great trick shot here at PGA.com. But this one, folks? This one backfired -- literally.

You should never play with fire, as the "golfer" in this video learned the hard way:

After striking a golf ball that's on fire, the man himself catches fire. Looks like he's OK, but that wasn't smart.

A video like that makes us long for the next Bryan Brothers trick-shot video. Those guys know what they're doing.

Man catches fire after hitting flaming golf ball
August 21, 2014 - 9:42am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
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Tony Gil
Youth Summer Olympic Games
The Youth Summer Olympic Games are going on in Nanjing, China, this week. That's where 16-year-old Tony Gil from Canada hit a shot he'll remember for the rest of his life.

The Youth Olympic Games are underway in China right now and during the first round of the Youth Olympic Men's Individual Stroke Play Competition at Zhongshan International Golf Club on Tuesday, there was a very special moment.

Tony Gil, a 16-year-old from Canada, aced the 164-yard, par-3 third hole.

It was the first hole-in-one made in an Olympic competition and also the first of Gil's career.

You can see video of Gil's ace here:

Pretty nice to have it captured on video, eh?

"It was a bit humid today so I used a 7-iron," Gil said after his opening round of 3-under 69. "I knew I'd hit it close but didn't know it was in until I went to the green and saw the ball in the hole."

It was only after the round that Gil realised he had made a little bit of history with the first hole-in-one in an Olympic competition.

"Oh really? That's very cool. It was actually the first hole-in-one in my career too!" he said.

The competition ended on Thursday. Gil finished in 22nd place.

Click here for the final results

Watch: Canada's Gil, 16, makes hole-in-one at Youth Olympic Games