March 26, 2015 - 2:02pm
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Cheyenne Woods
LPGA Facebook
Cheyenne Woods, niece of Tiger, is playing the LPGA these days. Her gorgeous swing resembles that of her uncle circa 2000.

Cheyenne Woods -- niece of 14-time major champ Tiger Woods -- is playing in the LPGA's Kia Classic this week.

On Wednesday, the LPGA posted this slow-motion video of Cheyenne's swing. And, well, it's a thing of beauty.

RELATED: Cheyenne Woods recreates Tiger's famous Nike juggling commercial

Check it out:

 

Check out @cheyenne_woods swing in slo-mo @lpgakiaclassic

Posted by LPGA on Wednesday, March 25, 2015

 

As some commenters noted, it looks similiar to her uncle's swing from the early 2000s.

 

Gorgeous.  

Cheyenne Woods' slow-motion swing resembles 2000 Tiger Woods
March 26, 2015 - 12:20pm
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Tiger Woods
USA Today Sports Images
Tiger Woods made a $10,000 donation to the University of Maryland Eastern Shore to honor the memory his late friend, Charlie Sifford.

The University of Maryland Eastern Shore in Princess Anne, Md., announced Thursday that Tiger Woods is the first individual donor to the school's scholarship fund that will honor the memory of the late Dr. Charlie Sifford.

RELATED: Sifford receives Medal of Freedom | Tiger: Sifford a trailblazer

UMES issued a release on the donation, which read in part:

Woods' personal gift of $10,000 will launch the Sifford Fund, which UMES is creating to "provide need-based scholarships to highly talented students who demonstrate a passion for the game of golf... and who are from populations underrepresented in the golf industry."

UMES is the nation's lone historically black university that offers a bachelor's degree in professional golf management accredited by the PGA of America (PGA.com profiled the school in 2011).

"The University of Maryland Eastern Shore is honored to accept this generous gift from Tiger Woods to support our professional golf management program and to partner with us in acknowledging Dr. Sifford's role as a sports pioneer," UMES President Juliette B. Bell said.

Sifford, who broke professional golf's color barrier in 1961, died at the age of 92 on Feb. 3.

MORE SIFFORD: Check out our #ThanksCharlieSifford page | Sifford photo gallery

Sifford and Woods were very close. After his death, Woods wrote to the Associated Press in an email, "It's not an exaggeration to say that without Charlie, and the other pioneers who fought to play, I may not be playing golf. My pop likely wouldn't have picked up the sport, and maybe I wouldn't have either."

Woods has also referred to Sifford as, "The grandpa I never had."

Back in November 2014, Sifford -- a two-time winner on the PGA Tour and the 1975 Senior PGA Champion -- was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor.  

 

Woods donates $10K to honor school's Sifford Scholarship Fund
Sam Burns
Megan Blank/The PGA of America
Reigning boys' Junior PGA Champion Sam Burns admits that he'll be "a little nervous" when he makes his PGA Tour debut on Thursday.
 
Winning the Junior PGA Championship would be a career highlight for any young golfer. For reigning champion Sam Burns, his victory last summer is still paying off big-time.
 
As part of a unique arrangement with PGA Tour's Valero Texas Open, one of the perks of capturing the Junior PGA Championship title is a berth at TPC San Antonio this week. Kristen Gillman, the reigning girls' Junior PGA Champion, will play in the LPGA Tour's Swinging Skirts Classic in California next month.
 
Burns – an 18-year-old high school senior from Shreveport, Louisiana – will tee off at 10:20 a.m. ET Thursday with rookie Mark Hubbard and Scotland's Marc Warren.
 
"I think it's great for junior golf to let kids our age have this opportunity," said Burns, the nation's top-ranked male junior player as well as the world's No. 9-ranked male amateur. "I think if they don't get the opportunity to play at that young of an age, they won't be that prepared whenever they're 25 or 30. I think this will help a lot for me personally later down the road."
 
Along with missing school this week, he's already made one lifelong memory – he played a practice round with Jordan Spieth, who made his PGA Tour debut at age 16 at the HP Byron Nelson Championship.
 
 
"He said go out and have some fun, not let all the hype get to you," Burns said after his round. "He's been through this. He's young. He knows what it's like. So I think playing with him was a great person to learn from because he's already done this."
 
And while many young golfers seek to get on the fast track that Spieth took to the PGA Tour, Burns knows that this week is more about experience than expectations. 
 
"It's hard to set expectations for yourself if you've never been in this position, to play in a Tour event," he said. "You get to meet some new people, see what it's like … learn from what everybody else is doing, see how they prepare, see what they're doing off the course, how they handle the media, the fans, that kind of stuff.
 
"That doesn't mean I want to go out there and not play well," he added quickly. "I'm here to play my best and if that's the case, then I think I'll be in good shape."
 
 
Despite winning the Junior PGA Championship in Bryan, Texas, last summer and making his PGA Tour debut in San Antonio, Burns plans to stick closer to home in the near future – he plans to attend Louisiana State University next fall, a decision he made, in part, because of his friendship with another PGA Tour player, Shreveport's David Toms, and Toms' son Carter.
 
Burns got to know Toms – a proud LSU alum – while playing in Shreveport and practicing at the David Toms Academy there. Toms, he says, has given him valuable advice and insight on both the LSU golf program and the PGA Tour.
 
"He's pretty open about what it's like out here, and getting to play with him and see what it takes, where my game needs to be to compete out here," Burns said of the 2001 PGA Champion. "So I think that will definitely help a lot going forward."
 
For now, though, Burns is focused on this week – specifically that first tee shot Thursday morning.
 
"I think I'll be a little nervous, as any kid would be," he admitted. " But I think in the same respect that it's not about getting too nervous because of the stage or the atmosphere, you just have to stay focused and be grateful that you're here. Not a lot of 18-year-olds get this opportunity."
 
Here's a quick video of Burns and Spieth:
 
Junior PGA Champion Sam Burns makes PGA Tour debut this week
March 25, 2015 - 10:06am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Jordan Spieth
USA Today Sports Images
Can Jordan Spieth make it two wins in two starts this week?

The next two weeks on the PGA Tour provide us with a tournament within a tournament.

First, this week, the Valero Texas Open takes place at TPC San Antonio. The top 50 players in the Official World Golf Ranking come Sunday night -- if not already exempt -- will lock up their respective invitation to the Masters in two weeks. The winner -- also if not already exempt -- will head to Augusta National as well.

Then, next week, the Shell Houston Open is the final chance for players not otherwise exempt for the Masters to punch a last-minute ticket. That will require a win.

RELATED: Texas Open tee times | Cancer strengthens PGA friends bond | Masters bubble | Field

For now, we'll focus on the Valero Texas Open, where Steven Bowditch is the defending champion. The field features 13 major champions, including Phil Mickelson, Jason Dufner and 2016 U.S. Ryder Cup Captain Davis Love III.

Here are five players to watch.

5. Ben Curtis
Best finish in 2014-15 season:
T29 at Sanderson Farms Championship
Reason to watch: Curtis will be the first to admit that it hasn't exactly been a season to remember to this point. He's missed the cut four times in six starts, including the last three in a row. The last time he made a cut resulted in a T44 at the OHL Classic back in the middle of November. I'm just taking a chance on Curtis this week. Something's got to give. He won the event in 2012, so he has familiarity and past success to draw on. Things need to turn around for the former British Open champ, so why not this week? He's one of those guys who will need a win to make the Masters.

4. Ryan Palmer
Best finish in 2014-15 season:
T2 at the Waste Management Phoenix Open
Reason to watch: It's hard to believe that this three-time Tour winner hasn't won more. He seems to be in contention an awful lot, but just has a problem closing out. It would mean everything to this native Texan to win in the Lone Star State. Palmer tied for ninth in the Texas Open in 2010. Palmer is already in the Masters, so I want to see him firing at pins this week and letting it all hang out.

3. Zach Johnson
Best finish in 2014-15 season:
7th at Hyundai Tournament of Champions
Reason to watch: Johnson is a former two-time champion of this event. However, those wins came in 2008 and 2009 when the event was still played at La Cantera. Since the move to TPC San Antonio in 2010, Johnson has played just twice. He missed the cut in 2010 and tied for sixth in 2014. I like Johnson mainly because I always like him in the state of Texas, where he's captured four of his 11 PGA Tour wins. His T9 last week at Bay Hill might have been a little momentum builder for the former Masters champ.

2. Jimmy Walker
Best finish in 2014-15 season:
Won the Sony Open in Hawaii
Reason to watch: Yet again, Walker is enjoying another outstanding season -- four top 10s (including a win) in nine starts and no missed cuts. He's established himself as a favorite whenever and wherever he tees it up. A win this week would be his fifth on the PGA Tour and few would be as sweet as this one would come in his home state.

1. Jordan Spieth
Best finish in 2014-15 season:
Won the Valspar Championship
Reason to watch: This is Spieth's first start since winning his second Tour event two weeks ago in Tampa. The 21-year-old is establishing himself as a star and it would be sweet to shine again this week in his home state. Notice the theme here? Lots of Texans in the field. Also, Spieth has his sights set on the Masters, where he was a runner up in his first start a year ago. His game -- always consistent -- seems to be peaking at just the right time.

Here's how my five to watch fared at last week's Arnold Palmer Invitational:

5. Henrik Stenson -- 2nd
4. Keegan Bradley -- T49
3. Rickie Fowler -- T29
2. Adam Scott -- T35
1. Jason Day -- T17 

5 players to watch at the Texas Open
Jack Nicklaus
U.S. Congress via YouTube
Jack Nicklaus said he was "honestly and completely humbled" to receive the Congressional Gold Medal on Tuesday.
 
Jack Nicklaus became the third golfer to receive the Congressional Gold Medal – the highest honor that the U.S. Congress can bestow on an individual – in an emotional ceremony on Tuesday.
 
"My whole life's work was to make you all proud of me," Nicklaus said to his wife Barbara, five children and 22 grandchildren – all of whom attended the festivities in the Capitol Rotunda. "Hopefully, I have."
 
Jim Nantz, the longtime voice of CBS sports' golf coverage, called Nicklaus "an American treasure" and "our gift to the world." He added that Nicklaus' "philanthropic victories are more special than his golf conquests," and noted the Nicklaus family's extensive efforts in raising money for the military, spinal cord and cancer research, and especially children's health.
 
In an emotional 20-minute acceptance speech, Nicklaus detailed how his father introduced him to the game at age 10, and used golf to teach him the very important lessons of how to win and how to handle adversity.
 
He also recounted an occasion when his son, Jack II, was young, was asked what his father did for a living.  "Nothing," Jackie said, "he just plays golf."
 
 
Nicklaus used that as a theme throughout his remarks, noting how "just playing golf" allowed him to meet seven U.S. presidents, travel the world and meet people from all stations of life around the globe. He has always been impressed, he said, at how effective golf is at crossing borders and connecting generations.
 
"For millions of people, golf does so much," he added. "The game of golf as a whole has given more to charity than all other sports combined – almost $4 billion in charitable giving each year."
 
A significant of that, of course, comes from Nicklaus, and several of the speakers praised the Golden Bear and wife Barbara for their lifelong commitment to philanthropy – including their recent pledge of $60 million to children's health care in Florida. 
 
Nicklaus gave his wife much of the credit for spearheading their charitable activities, and broke down when discussing her important to him and their family. 
 
 
"Were it not for Barbara," I'd have been just another golfer," he said. He also said that she was responsible for 15 of his major champions, adding that "I'll give myself credit for three."
 
Nicklaus received the award in a special gathering that included Senate and House leaders from both parties as well as the entire Congressional delegation from Ohio. Among the special guests was his friend and rival, Arnold Palmer; Nicklaus attended the 2012 ceremony in which Palmer received his Gold Medal.
 
The Congressional Gold Medal is the highest honor that the U.S. Congress can bestow. Nicklaus was chosen "in recognition of his many contributions to the game of golf and his service to the community and the nation," according to the bill, which was authored by Rep. Pat Tiberi of Ohio.
 
Nicklaus is the third golfer to receive the Gold Medal, following Palmer and Byron Nelson (2006). Other athletes to have received it include Jackie Robinson, Roberto Clemente, Joe Louis and Jesse Owens.
 
The first gold medal was awarded to George Washington for his military courage during the Revolutionary War. For a person to even be considered, two-thirds of the House members (290) and the Senate (67) must cosponsor the legislation (not just vote for it).
 
You can watch the ceremony right here:
 
 
Jack Nicklaus receives Congressional Gold Medal in ceremony at U.S. Capitol
Bubba Watson
The Tonight Show via YouTube
Bubba Watson took two pies in the face on "The Tonight Show" - and still won his game of "Pie Golf" with Jimmy Fallon.
 
Bubba Watson says he's "a big, big believer" in the Drive, Chip & Putt Championship, and no one can doubt him after Monday night. Watson is such a believer that he took not one but two pies in the face for it.
 
Watson stopped by "The Tonight Show" to promote the event, and wound up facing host Jimmy Fallon in a game of "Pie Golf." In case you've never played – and I'm guessing you haven't since Fallon and his crew made it up – "Pie Golf" is essentially darts with big, smushy golf balls, and with a twist: If your shot sticks on the wall, your opponent gets a pie in the face.
 
 
As you can see in the screenshot above, Watson got pied by actress January Jones after losing the first round. No worries, though – he responded with a perfect shot that earned Fallon a faceful of pie. And in the end, the two-time Masters champion prevailed – and for his victory earned a yellow "Pie Golf" poncho that would actually go with his Green Jacket (which he wisely took off before the game).
 
After a quick clean-up, Watson joined Fallon for a chat about the Masters – and the Drive, Chip & Putt Championship.
 
 
"Golf to me is all about family. These kids are trying to qualify to get to the home of the Masters, and it's free for the families to get involved," Watson told Fallon.
 
Watson also admitted that he gets something out of the event, too.
 
"I learn from the kids," he said. "Sometimes I forget about how great it is to play golf for a living, and they remind me. They're such an inspiration – they help you remember pretty quickly."
 
Watson and 10-year-old Kelly Xu are in New York Monday and Tuesday to promote next month's Drive, Chip & Putt Championship finals and encourage youngsters to register for this summer's local qualifying for the next edition of the event. Xu is the reigning champion in the 7-9-year-old Girls Division.
 
 
The Drive, Chip & Putt Championship is a free nationwide youth golf competition open to boys and girls ages 7-15, who compete in separate divisions in four age categories. Xu, now 10, is one of 80 national finalists who will compete at Augusta National on Sunday, April 5 – the eve of the Masters Tournament. 
 
"I'm a big, big believer in the Drive, Chip & Putt Championship," said Watson before his visit to New York. "I can't think of a better way for a youngster to learn and get better at the game of golf and do it while having fun and building relationships. That's what golf is ultimately all about for me. … I hope the two of us can share our passion for this program with as many parents and kids around the country as possible and get them to register for an experience of a lifetime."
 
Watson's appearance on "The Tonight Show" precedes a whirlwind Tuesday that will see him and Xu make numerous media appearances. They'll start their day with an 8:30 a.m. ET interview on "CBS This Morning," followed by a 9:45 a.m. interview on ESPN's "SportsCenter."
 
After that, they'll head outside to shoot some photos and video in Times Square, and do interviews with the Golf Channel and other media outlets at Rockefeller Center. They'll visit the New York Stock Exchange and tour the trading floor around 3:00 p.m., and appear on CNBC at 3:40 p.m. After that, there will be even more interviews to cap off their busy day, and you can follow them all day on PGA.com and our Twitter and Facebook accounts.
 
 
 
 
Bubba Watson promotes Drive, Chip & Putt with Jimmy Fallon on The Tonight Show