August 22, 2014 - 1:09pm
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Seung-Yul Noh
PGA Tour
If you hit your ball off the wrong green it's a two-shot penalty. Seung-Yul Noh learned that on Friday at the Barclays.

Oops.

That's what Korea's Seung-Yul Noh must have been thinking after making a costly mistake in the second round of the Barclays on Friday.

Playing the 11th hole, Noh hit a tee shot way to the right. So far right that it came to rest in the middle of the adjacent third green.

That's where Noh made a big mistake moments later. Rather than taking relief without penalty with his ball lying on the wrong green (USGA Rule 25-3), Noh elected to hit the shot from the green as superintendents everywhere probably cringed.

RELATED: Barclays leaderboard | Five players to watch at Barclays | 2014-15 Tour schedule

As you'll see in the video below, Noh took a healthy divot out of the green too.

Because he hit the shot, Noh was assessed a two-shot penalty and wound up making a triple-bogey 7 on the hole.

 

It truly was a round-killer. Noh was 4 under for the day to that point, but that triple bogey, followed by bogeys on Nos. 16 and 17 led to a 1-over 72.

Here is how the official rule reads:

25-3. Wrong Putting Green
a. Interference
Interference by a wrong putting green occurs when a ball is on the wrong putting green.

Interference to a player's stance or the area of his intended swing is not, of itself, interference under this Rule.

b. Relief
If a player's ball lies on a wrong putting green, he must not play the ball as it lies. He must take relief, without penalty, as follows:

The player must lift the ball and drop it within one club-length of and not nearer the hole than the nearest point of relief. The nearest point of relief must not be in a hazard or on a putting green. When dropping the ball within one club-length of the nearest point of relief, the ball must first strike a part of the course at a spot that avoids interference by the wrong putting green and is not in a hazard and not on a putting green. The ball may be cleaned when lifted under this Rule.

The penalty for breaching this rule is loss of hole in match play and a two-stroke penalty in stroke play.

Here's to hoping nobody has to putt through that divot. 

Noh penalized for hitting ball off wrong green
August 22, 2014 - 11:58am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Flaming golf ball
Vine
This is the ultimate in "golf trick-shot gone wrong."

We're fond of a great trick shot here at PGA.com. But this one, folks? This one backfired -- literally.

You should never play with fire, as the "golfer" in this video learned the hard way:

After striking a golf ball that's on fire, the man himself catches fire. Looks like he's OK, but that wasn't smart.

A video like that makes us long for the next Bryan Brothers trick-shot video. Those guys know what they're doing.

Man catches fire after hitting flaming golf ball
August 21, 2014 - 9:42am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
Tony Gil
Youth Summer Olympic Games
The Youth Summer Olympic Games are going on in Nanjing, China, this week. That's where 16-year-old Tony Gil from Canada hit a shot he'll remember for the rest of his life.

The Youth Olympic Games are underway in China right now and during the first round of the Youth Olympic Men's Individual Stroke Play Competition at Zhongshan International Golf Club on Tuesday, there was a very special moment.

Tony Gil, a 16-year-old from Canada, aced the 164-yard, par-3 third hole.

It was the first hole-in-one made in an Olympic competition and also the first of Gil's career.

You can see video of Gil's ace here:

Pretty nice to have it captured on video, eh?

"It was a bit humid today so I used a 7-iron," Gil said after his opening round of 3-under 69. "I knew I'd hit it close but didn't know it was in until I went to the green and saw the ball in the hole."

It was only after the round that Gil realised he had made a little bit of history with the first hole-in-one in an Olympic competition.

"Oh really? That's very cool. It was actually the first hole-in-one in my career too!" he said.

The competition ended on Thursday. Gil finished in 22nd place.

Click here for the final results

Watch: Canada's Gil, 16, makes hole-in-one at Youth Olympic Games
August 20, 2014 - 12:53pm
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
Chris Condon/PGA Tour
On Wednesday (Aug. 20) at The Barclays in Paramus, N.J., seven members of the 2014 United States Ryder Cup Team accepted the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge from Captain Tom Watson. Pictured from left to right: Rickie Fowler, Jim Furyk, Jordan Spieth, Patrick Reed, Zach Johnson, Bubba Watson and Jimmy Walker.

U.S. Ryder Cup Captain Tom Watson took part in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge in memory of his late friend and longtime caddie, Bruce Edwards, on Monday (click here to see the video).

Watson then called out the nine automatic qualifiers of the U.S. Team to take the challenge.

Well, on Wednesday, seven of the players accepted the challenge together -- a stunt organized by Jimmy Walker.

ALS ICE BUCKET CHALLENGES: Tom Watson | Tiger & Rory | Former President George W. Bush

Rickie Fowler, Jim Furyk, Jordan Spieth, Patrick Reed, Zach Johnson, Bubba Watson and Walker all gathered at Ridgewood Country Club -- site of this week's Barclays -- to complete the challenge.

Phil Mickelson and Matt Kuchar were the only players not there, but Mickelson's caddie, Jim "Bones" Mackay, helped other caddies douse the players in attendance with the ice cold water which came from buckets bearing each player's last name.

It was quite the scene too. While most of the players were dressed as if they'd just walked off the course, that wasn't the case for Johnson and Watson.

Johnson looked like he had just stepped out of the gym in a t-shirt and shorts, while a shirtless Watson looked like... well, a shirtless Watson.

Here's the video:

 

 

The European Ryder Cup team is on the clock.

Together, U.S. Ryder Cup Team accepts ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
August 20, 2014 - 11:11am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
tj.auclair's picture
George W. Bush
Facebook
Rory McIlroy called out former President George W. Bush to take the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Here's the video of Bush accepting the challenge.

Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy joined forces on Tuesday to take the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. It was a big hit.

As is customary, the star golfers also nominated others to take part in the challenge.

One of McIlroy's nominations was former President George W. Bush, or, as McIlroy called him in the video, "a.k.a. 43."

Well, "43" -- a huge golf fan -- stepped up in a big way. Check out his video, accepting the challenge, here:

 
Former President George W. Bush accepts Rory McIlroy's challenge
August 20, 2014 - 8:59am
Posted by:
T.J. Auclair
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Bubba Watson
USA Today Sports Images
Bubba Watson realizes he made a lot of mistakes during the PGA Championship two weeks ago and is taking accountability for his actions.

Two-time Masters champion Bubba Watson drew plenty of criticism for something he didn't do at the PGA Championship two weeks ago and a few of things he did do.

First, the thing he didn't do. He chose not to take part in the PGA Championship's revitalized long-drive competition that was held during the Tuesday practice round on the par-5 10th hole at Valhalla.

Watson -- the longest hitter in the game -- protested the competition by electing to hit an iron off the tee instead of the driver he would use in competition.

RELATED: Five players to watch at Barclays | Tee times | Photos | Kuchar's back

As for the things he did do, well, that boiled down to Watson's attitude on the course.

A couple of tantrums that included audible curses, complaints about rain water collecting on his clubface, which he says influenced shots and also having caddie Ted Scott place a tee in the ground for him so Watson could stay under his umbrella.

Watson was taken to task by many, but none more so than veteran journalist Dave Kindred in this piece for Golf Digest.

The day after Kindred's sharply critical column, he met face-to-face with Watson to explain what he'd written. Rather than get upset, Watson took the criticism to heart and thanked Kindred, saying, "I need to be held accountable."

Watson reiterated that point with writers at The Barclays on Tuesday.

In a piece filed by GolfChannel.com's Jason Sobel, Watson talked about the fallout from his actions at the PGA Championship:

"Not competing in the Long Drive was the first mistake," Watson said. "That was the selfish part, because I didn’t agree with it, but there's a lot of things that I don't agree with that I do."

Watson continued.

"Then you look at it from my attitude on the golf course. Because I want something so bad, that's not the reason to do that. You still just bite your tongue and compete at a high level, don't show emotion. I take it overboard because I want something so bad. I want to be considered a great player. I want to win golf tournaments and I've got to learn on that.

"And then my language was not good. That's a different topic and childish again. It's all childish stuff and trying to mature and become a better man. Obviously, I take it on the chin. It was my fault. Everything's my fault and I should be bigger and stronger and better than that."

In Sobel's piece, Watson explained that he did do something right at the PGA Championship, aside from making the cut. After finishing his final round, the rain picked up significantly at Valhalla. A fan asked Watson if he could have his umbrella.

"I was like, 'you know what, that's a good question.' So I just gave it to him. I was like, 'I'm done. You need it more than I do.'"

And that wasn't it for the post-PGA Championship good deeds. Watson's on-course treatment of his caddie has also drawn criticism over the years. To his credit, Scott seems to understand Watson better than most. Watson clearly recognizes that and surprised Scott and his wife with a nice bonus for a successful year.

Scott tweeted out the gifts this week:

Watson wants to be held accountable for actions at PGA Championship