Masters 2017: Jordan Spieth asks, 'What would Arnie do?'

Jordan Spieth
@TheMasters on Twitter
Jordan Spieth is enjoying an incredible Round 3 at Augusta National on Saturday, one in which he's even thinking of Arnold Palmer.
By T.J. Auclair
PGA.com
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Published: Saturday, April 08, 2017 | 11:58 a.m.

From the "this will give you chills" department...

Jordan Spieth hit his tee shot into the pine straw to the right of the par-5 13th fairway. When he got to the ball and assessed the situation, he could be heard on the Masters.com "Amen Corner" coverage asking caddie Michael Greller, "What would Arnie do?"

Greller responded: "Hit it to 20 feet."

In the end, Spieth had to settle for 29 feet after an incredible shot to set up an unlikely eagle try.

 

 

 

 

Spieth just missed the eagle putt and tapped in for birdie. That put him at 4 under and just two behind leader Charley Hoffman.

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What a cool nod to the King, Arnold Palmer, who passed away last September and has been weighing heavy on the minds of many this week at Augusta National.

For what it's worth, Spieth was 10 off the lead after Round 1. According to Golf Channel stat guru Justin Ray, the only major champion in history to be 10+ back after the first round and win was Harry Vardon at the 1898 Open Championship (11 back).

Spieth, obviously, has a ways to go before potentially slipping into a second green jacket, but it has been a remarkable comeback thus far.

Also, Spieth is seeking to become the first player in Masters history to hold/share the 54-hole lead for four straight years.

Oh... and no player who has ever made a quadruple bogey at the Masters has won the tournament that same week. Spieth made a quadruple bogey at the par-5 15th in Round 1.

On Saturday, this was his third at that same hole, which set up a tap-in birdie:

 

T.J. Auclair is a Senior Interactive Producer for PGA.com and has covered professional golf since 1998, traveling to over 60 major championships. You can follow him on Twitter, @tjauclair.