Notebook: Throwback Moore signs on as face of "Arnie" line of apparel

ryan moore
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Ryan Moore's preference for classic golf clothing makes him a good match for the new line of apparel patterened after Arnold Palmer's classic looks.
By
Doug Ferguson
Associated Press

Series: PGA Tour

Arnold Palmer Enterprises and Quagmire Golf cloth have developed a new clothing line called “Arnie,” designed to reflect Palmer’s classic look from the 1950s through the 1970s.
 
They found the PGA Tour player they believe is perfect for the look: Ryan Moore.
 
Moore is a throwback, even wearing a skinny tie with a cardigan sweater on occasion. He will wear the “Arnie” collection on tour and make marketing appearances for the company.
 
“Mr. Palmer is among my all-time idols as a golfer and a person, so competing in these clothes and being so closely associated with his style legacy is a dream come true,” Moore said. “The research that went into each piece is really evident and when you combine those timeless elements with advanced technical fabrics you’ve got something great.”
 
The collection was developed in part by going through Palmer’s personal library of photographs. It will be distributed this year over six months, with three styles -- the 1950s (fitted pants and tops, small collars and shorter sleeves); the 1960s (wider pant legs and collars); and the 1970s (slightly wider collars, with gray as the signature color).
 
Geoff Tait, creative director for Arnie and Quagmire, said Moore was on everyone’s list to wear the clothes.
 
“He truly gets our vision and is a dapper guy who’s always moving mainstream menswear trends onto the fairways,” Tait said.
 
CITIZEN CARL: Carl Pettersson started his 10th season on the PGA Tour with a minor change: He’s now an American citizen.
 
He moved from Sweden to England when he was 10, then to North Carolina while still in high school. His father was an executive for Volvo. Pettersson never left, however. He played golf at North Carolina State, married a local girl, and settled in Raleigh to raise a family.
 
“I’ve been here for 20 years. My kids were born here. My wife is American,” Pettersson said. “I haven’t lived in Sweden since I was 10. I just wanted to do it because of my kids. And I feel American. It’s hard to say that because I know I was born in Sweden. But I played junior golf here, went to high school here.”
 
Pettersson said the process included fingerprints, a background check and a history test.
 
“And I got 100 on that, which I was proud of,” he said. “They had questions like when the Declaration of Independence was written, and some questions about the Constitution. I crammed it all in the night before, memorized it and then forgot it.”
 
POLICY BOARD: Ben Crane, Harrison Frazar and Scott Verplank are the nominees to be chairman of the Players Advisory Council. Voting lasts for about a month. The chairman eventually joins the policy board.
 
They are part of a 16-man PAC that was announced Tuesday. The other players are Stewart Cink, Jason Day, Ken Duke, Charley Hoffman, Matt Kuchar, Joe Ogilvie, Carl Pettersson, Justin Rose, Patrick Sheehan, Webb Simpson, Chris Stroud, Bo Van Pelt and Mark Wilson.
 
DIVOTS: The minor changes the world ranking board approved in 2010 now are complete. The new season began with 52 being the maximum tournaments that count as the divisor instead of 54. … Johnson Wagner and Harrison Frazar were the only players to start the season with top-10s in the two Hawaii tournaments. … Only five winners of the Sony Open did not play at Kapalua the previous week in the 14 years since the Hyundai Tournament of Champions moved to Maui. … Tom Pernice Jr. played the final round at Waialae with Kevin Chappell, who wasn’t even born when Pernice first played the Sony Open in 1986.
 
STAT OF THE WEEK: Steve Stricker has played the week after winning a PGA Tour event eight times in his career. His only finish in the top 10 was a tie for ninth in 2007 Deutsche Bank Championship.
 
FINAL WORD: “The PGA Tour, I mean, it’s the Nationwide on steroids.”— Jhonattan Vegas.