PGA Winter Championships resume with PGA Senior-Junior Championship

The PGA Winter Championships presented by Premier Golf and GOLF ADVISOR resume Tuesday, Jan. 27, at PGA Golf Club in Port St. Lucie, Florida, with the 56th PGA Senior-Junior Championship.

The defending champions of this 72-hole team event are JC Anderson of O’Fallon, Missouri, and Rod Perry of Port Orange, Florida. Anderson and Perry rallied to win last year’s Championship by two strokes over two teams: Pennsylvanians Kirk Stauffer and Michael O’Connor; and Floridians Gene Fieger and Justin Bertsch.

There are six events that comprise the PGA Winter Championships presented by Premier Golf and GOLF ADVISOR. On Jan. 7-8, Lonnie Nielsen of Orchard Park, New York, and Bob Dickson, of Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, won their respective age groups in the 61st PGA Quarter Century Championship. Bill Erfurth of Northbrook, Illinois, captured the PGA Half Century Championship.

The following week, Fieger won the 59-and-Under category in the 31st PGA Senior Stroke Play Championship. Roy Vucinich of Moon Township, Pennsylvania, was victorious in the 60-and-Over group. The 85-year-old Erfurth gained acclaim for shooting a cumulative total of 58 strokes below his age over the first 90 holes of the PGA Winter Championships.

The PGA of America will provide recaps and scores after each round to golf media. Please note the schedule of events and contacts for the 2015 PGA Winter Championships presented by Premier Golf and GOLF ADVISOR. To find local players from your area competing in the events, please visit pgatournaments.com.
 


Series: PGA Feature

Published: Monday, January 26, 2015 | 4:53 p.m.

The PGA Winter Championships presented by Premier Golf and GOLF ADVISOR resume Tuesday, Jan. 27, at PGA Golf Club in Port St. Lucie, Florida, with the 56th PGA Senior-Junior Championship.

The defending champions of this 72-hole team event are JC Anderson of O’Fallon, Missouri, and Rod Perry of Port Orange, Florida. Anderson and Perry rallied to win last year’s Championship by two strokes over two teams: Pennsylvanians Kirk Stauffer and Michael O’Connor; and Floridians Gene Fieger and Justin Bertsch.

There are six events that comprise the PGA Winter Championships presented by Premier Golf and GOLF ADVISOR. On Jan. 7-8, Lonnie Nielsen of Orchard Park, New York, and Bob Dickson, of Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, won their respective age groups in the 61st PGA Quarter Century Championship. Bill Erfurth of Northbrook, Illinois, captured the PGA Half Century Championship.

The following week, Fieger won the 59-and-Under category in the 31st PGA Senior Stroke Play Championship. Roy Vucinich of Moon Township, Pennsylvania, was victorious in the 60-and-Over group. The 85-year-old Erfurth gained acclaim for shooting a cumulative total of 58 strokes below his age over the first 90 holes of the PGA Winter Championships.

The PGA of America will provide recaps and scores after each round to golf media. Please note the schedule of events and contacts for the 2015 PGA Winter Championships presented by Premier Golf and GOLF ADVISOR. To find local players from your area competing in the events, please visit pgatournaments.com.
 


Ryan Palmer responds to young fan's thank you tweet

Ryan Palmer
A young fan named Ryder receives Ryan Palmer's hat Sunday at the Humana Challenge.
By Mark Aumann
PGA.com

Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Monday, January 26, 2015 | 4:08 p.m.

Eight former RBC Heritage champions commit to Harbour Town in April

Two-time champions Stewart Cink and Boo Weekley are among eight former champions making early commitments to the 47th annual RBC Heritage Presented by Boeing.

In addition to Cink and Weekley, Graeme McDowell, Carl Pettersson, Brandt Snedeker, Jim Furyk, Justin Leonard and Glen Day are all slated to compete at South Carolina's only regular PGA Tour event taking place April 13 through 19 the Hilton Head Island's Harbour Town Golf Links.

McDowell earned his second win on the PGA Tour at the 2013 RBC Heritage. He defeated Webb Simpson at Harbour Town in a sudden-death playoff. He also won two events on the European Tour in 2013, running his career total of European wins to eight. He is ranked 19th in the world.

Pettersson's 2012 victory at the RBC Heritage was his fifth on the PGA Tour. The win tied him with Jesper Parnevik for most wins on the PGA Tour by a Swedish player.

After winning the 2011 Heritage, Snedeker won twice in 2012, first at the Farmers Insurance Open and then at The Tour Championship. He also won twice in 2013, first at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am and then at the RBC Canadian Open.

Furyk earned the Heritage trophy in 2010 then continued his winning streak at The Tour Championship and was ultimately named that year's FedExCup Champion. He has earned 16 PGA Tour victories during his career.

Weekley enjoyed his first and second PGA Tour wins during back-to-back appearances at the Harbour Town Golf Links. He captured his third victory at the 2013 Crown Plaza Invitational at Colonial.

Cink is a former British Open Champion who captured the Heritage in 2000 and again in 2004. The Georgia Tech alum has earned six wins on the PGA Tour.

Leonard has carded a dozen wins on the PGA Tour including his 2002 victory at Harbour Town.

Day's career on the PGA Tour began in 1994. He defeated Payne Stewart and Jeff Sluman in a play off to win at Harbour Town in 1999.

This article was from The State and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Series: PGA Tour

Published: Sunday, January 25, 2015 | 10:51 a.m.

Two-time champions Stewart Cink and Boo Weekley are among eight former champions making early commitments to the 47th annual RBC Heritage Presented by Boeing.

In addition to Cink and Weekley, Graeme McDowell, Carl Pettersson, Brandt Snedeker, Jim Furyk, Justin Leonard and Glen Day are all slated to compete at South Carolina's only regular PGA Tour event taking place April 13 through 19 the Hilton Head Island's Harbour Town Golf Links.

McDowell earned his second win on the PGA Tour at the 2013 RBC Heritage. He defeated Webb Simpson at Harbour Town in a sudden-death playoff. He also won two events on the European Tour in 2013, running his career total of European wins to eight. He is ranked 19th in the world.

Pettersson's 2012 victory at the RBC Heritage was his fifth on the PGA Tour. The win tied him with Jesper Parnevik for most wins on the PGA Tour by a Swedish player.

After winning the 2011 Heritage, Snedeker won twice in 2012, first at the Farmers Insurance Open and then at The Tour Championship. He also won twice in 2013, first at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am and then at the RBC Canadian Open.

Furyk earned the Heritage trophy in 2010 then continued his winning streak at The Tour Championship and was ultimately named that year's FedExCup Champion. He has earned 16 PGA Tour victories during his career.

Weekley enjoyed his first and second PGA Tour wins during back-to-back appearances at the Harbour Town Golf Links. He captured his third victory at the 2013 Crown Plaza Invitational at Colonial.

Cink is a former British Open Champion who captured the Heritage in 2000 and again in 2004. The Georgia Tech alum has earned six wins on the PGA Tour.

Leonard has carded a dozen wins on the PGA Tour including his 2002 victory at Harbour Town.

Day's career on the PGA Tour began in 1994. He defeated Payne Stewart and Jeff Sluman in a play off to win at Harbour Town in 1999.

This article was from The State and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Jimenez, Mediate share second-round lead at Mitsubishi Electric Championship

KAUPULEHU-KONA, Hawaii -- Miguel Angel Jimenez shot an 8-under 64 in windy conditions Saturday for a share of the lead with Rocco Mediate in the Champions Tour's season-opening Mitsubishi Electric Championship.

Jimenez had nine birdies and a closing bogey to match Mediate at 11-under 133 at Hualalai Golf Club. Mediate, the first-round leader after a 66, had a bogey-free 67.

"I played very well today," Jimenez said. "Very solid for the first hole. I have myself a chance on just about every hole."

Jimenez is making his third Champions Tour start. The Spaniard won the Greater Gwinnett Championship last year, a week after finishing fourth in the Masters. In May, he won the Spanish Open at 50 years, 133 days to break his own record as the oldest European Tour champion.

Mediate won twice on the 50-and over tour in 2013.

"With this wind, you just have to pay attention and play the right shot," Mediate said. "It was nasty coming in."

Olin Browne was third at 9 under after a 67. Fred Couples, Colin Montgomerie and Mark O'Meara were another stroke back. Couples shot 64, Montgomerie 66, and O'Meara 67.

Couples had an eagle and three birdies on the four par 5s.

"I putted really well," Couples said. "I hit some really good putts early in the round and they didn't go in, then I started making them and they all went in."

Defending champion Bernhard Langer was 7 under after a 65. He had a 10 on the par-5 seventh hole in his opening 72.

The 40-player field features major champions from the last five years, other tournament winners in the last two seasons and sponsor invitees.

This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


Series: Champions Tour

Published: Sunday, January 25, 2015 | 10:45 a.m.

KAUPULEHU-KONA, Hawaii -- Miguel Angel Jimenez shot an 8-under 64 in windy conditions Saturday for a share of the lead with Rocco Mediate in the Champions Tour's season-opening Mitsubishi Electric Championship.

Jimenez had nine birdies and a closing bogey to match Mediate at 11-under 133 at Hualalai Golf Club. Mediate, the first-round leader after a 66, had a bogey-free 67.

"I played very well today," Jimenez said. "Very solid for the first hole. I have myself a chance on just about every hole."

Jimenez is making his third Champions Tour start. The Spaniard won the Greater Gwinnett Championship last year, a week after finishing fourth in the Masters. In May, he won the Spanish Open at 50 years, 133 days to break his own record as the oldest European Tour champion.

Mediate won twice on the 50-and over tour in 2013.

"With this wind, you just have to pay attention and play the right shot," Mediate said. "It was nasty coming in."

Olin Browne was third at 9 under after a 67. Fred Couples, Colin Montgomerie and Mark O'Meara were another stroke back. Couples shot 64, Montgomerie 66, and O'Meara 67.

Couples had an eagle and three birdies on the four par 5s.

"I putted really well," Couples said. "I hit some really good putts early in the round and they didn't go in, then I started making them and they all went in."

Defending champion Bernhard Langer was 7 under after a 65. He had a 10 on the par-5 seventh hole in his opening 72.

The 40-player field features major champions from the last five years, other tournament winners in the last two seasons and sponsor invitees.

This article was from The Associated Press and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.


McGovern: Nicklaus set the bar for modern Tour players

Jack Nicklaus, born Jan. 21, 1940, turned 75 last week.

Seventy-five.

There's no way that seems possible.

He doesn't look 75, and seeing as how he still plays tennis, fishes, continues to design golf courses all over the world and is a spectator for the activities/games of his 22 grandchildren, including Florida State tight end Nick O'Leary, he doesn't act 75, either.

But if you do the math, it computes, and if you've followed the timeline of golf history, that adds up, too.

So how could he have gotten to be that old, when I can't remember him being anything but so young?

There's the 1-iron -- kids, ask your parents, or grandparents -- he hit to within 5 inches at the par-3 17th hole at Pebble Beach on his way to winning the 1972 U.S Open championship

The 40-footer up the hill for birdie at the par-3 16th that helped him hold off Johnny Miller and Tom Weiskopf and win the 1975 Masters

The sheer joy he exhibited when he won the 1980 U.S. Open at Baltusrol, which put to rest the notion that he was washed up

And the eagle at 15, the near-ace at 16 and the birdie -- "Yes, sir!" -- at 17 that led to what might be the most compelling, exciting and unexpected final round in major championship history, Nicklaus' victory in the 1986 Masters.

At age 46.

It's hard to believe that was nearly 30 years ago.

Well, in the meantime, just about everything about golf has changed -- the equipment, the technology, the players' training regimens, the players' fashion sense, the sophistication of statistics, the sheer volume of statistics, the increase in purses, the addition of entourages, the absence of polyester, the way we can watch on TV and on our smartphones and on our tablets.

Nicklaus changed over the course of his career, too. He had two distinctly different body types -- he came by his nickname of Fat Jack honestly -- and a hairstyle that went from slicked-back to stylish. His wardrobe also underwent a necessary upgrade.

But amidst all that change, involving Nicklaus and the game of golf through the decades, one thing has remained constant since that day in April 1986: 18, the number of major championships he won.

It's the only measuring stick in golf that really matters.

Eighteen is to golf what 61 was to baseball: Reach that number and you're guaranteed greatness; surpass it and you're the greatest.

So we can thank Nicklaus for saving us the time and the trouble of having a debate, because until someone gets to 18 or beyond, the greatest golfer of all time is not up for discussion.

And we're not likely to have that discussion, at least in the near future, because time is not on Tiger Woods' side.

Woods' singular focus, since he was a kid, has been breaking Nicklaus' record, and for a while, it looked as if he were a good bet.

But now, not so much.

The combination of injuries, surgeries, swing remakes and age have made him more of a longshot than a sure shot.

Going back to 1960, just 9 percent of major championship winners have been 40 or older.

Woods, who owns 14 majors, turned 39 -- an old 39 -- Dec. 30.

So the Golden Bear figures to be the game's gold standard for a while.

But he's also made an impact for reasons other than winning tournaments. His class, integrity and willingness to give back have equaled his accomplishments on the golf course.

You'd be hard-pressed to come up with another athlete, in any sport, who performed as well and behaved as honorably. He was humble in victory and unbelievably gracious in defeat.

Nicklaus set the bar for all who have followed him. Today's players may not come close to matching his resume, but they can surely aspire to mirror his character and sportsmanship.

What could be better for the game?

Or a more fitting birthday tribute to him.

This article was written by Mike McGovern from Reading Eagle, Pa. and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. 

By
Mike McGovern

Series: PGA Tour

Published: Sunday, January 25, 2015 | 10:41 a.m.

Jack Nicklaus, born Jan. 21, 1940, turned 75 last week.

Seventy-five.

There's no way that seems possible.

He doesn't look 75, and seeing as how he still plays tennis, fishes, continues to design golf courses all over the world and is a spectator for the activities/games of his 22 grandchildren, including Florida State tight end Nick O'Leary, he doesn't act 75, either.

But if you do the math, it computes, and if you've followed the timeline of golf history, that adds up, too.

So how could he have gotten to be that old, when I can't remember him being anything but so young?

There's the 1-iron -- kids, ask your parents, or grandparents -- he hit to within 5 inches at the par-3 17th hole at Pebble Beach on his way to winning the 1972 U.S Open championship

The 40-footer up the hill for birdie at the par-3 16th that helped him hold off Johnny Miller and Tom Weiskopf and win the 1975 Masters

The sheer joy he exhibited when he won the 1980 U.S. Open at Baltusrol, which put to rest the notion that he was washed up

And the eagle at 15, the near-ace at 16 and the birdie -- "Yes, sir!" -- at 17 that led to what might be the most compelling, exciting and unexpected final round in major championship history, Nicklaus' victory in the 1986 Masters.

At age 46.

It's hard to believe that was nearly 30 years ago.

Well, in the meantime, just about everything about golf has changed -- the equipment, the technology, the players' training regimens, the players' fashion sense, the sophistication of statistics, the sheer volume of statistics, the increase in purses, the addition of entourages, the absence of polyester, the way we can watch on TV and on our smartphones and on our tablets.

Nicklaus changed over the course of his career, too. He had two distinctly different body types -- he came by his nickname of Fat Jack honestly -- and a hairstyle that went from slicked-back to stylish. His wardrobe also underwent a necessary upgrade.

But amidst all that change, involving Nicklaus and the game of golf through the decades, one thing has remained constant since that day in April 1986: 18, the number of major championships he won.

It's the only measuring stick in golf that really matters.

Eighteen is to golf what 61 was to baseball: Reach that number and you're guaranteed greatness; surpass it and you're the greatest.

So we can thank Nicklaus for saving us the time and the trouble of having a debate, because until someone gets to 18 or beyond, the greatest golfer of all time is not up for discussion.

And we're not likely to have that discussion, at least in the near future, because time is not on Tiger Woods' side.

Woods' singular focus, since he was a kid, has been breaking Nicklaus' record, and for a while, it looked as if he were a good bet.

But now, not so much.

The combination of injuries, surgeries, swing remakes and age have made him more of a longshot than a sure shot.

Going back to 1960, just 9 percent of major championship winners have been 40 or older.

Woods, who owns 14 majors, turned 39 -- an old 39 -- Dec. 30.

So the Golden Bear figures to be the game's gold standard for a while.

But he's also made an impact for reasons other than winning tournaments. His class, integrity and willingness to give back have equaled his accomplishments on the golf course.

You'd be hard-pressed to come up with another athlete, in any sport, who performed as well and behaved as honorably. He was humble in victory and unbelievably gracious in defeat.

Nicklaus set the bar for all who have followed him. Today's players may not come close to matching his resume, but they can surely aspire to mirror his character and sportsmanship.

What could be better for the game?

Or a more fitting birthday tribute to him.

This article was written by Mike McGovern from Reading Eagle, Pa. and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. 


2015 Masters Field List

Bubba Watson
2014 Masters champion Bubba Watson will return to defend his green jacket in April.

Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Friday, January 23, 2015 | 11:56 a.m.

Stop fearing failure on the golf course, sports psychologist says

Bhrett McCabe
Dr. Bhrett McCabe says failure on the golf course can be productive, if you learn from it.
By Mark Aumann
PGA.com

Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Thursday, January 22, 2015 | 5:53 p.m.

Russ Ortiz's passions include golf, giving back to the community

Russ Ortiz
Contributed photo/Justin Silverstein
2nd Guy Golf executives Russ Ortiz, L.J. Richardson and Justin Silverstein pose with their product line.
By Mark Aumann
PGA.com

Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Thursday, January 22, 2015 | 3:01 p.m.

Christopher Duncan
Timothy Self
Syndicate content