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It was 19 years ago today, Feb. 7, 2000, that Tiger Woods overcame a 7-shot deficit with seven holes to play at the Pebble Beach National Pro-Am.

On this day 19 years ago, Feb. 7, 2000, Tiger Woods remarkably overcame a seven-shot deficit with seven holes to play to defeat Matt Gogel in the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am and claim his sixth consecutive PGA Tour victory.

That win allowed Woods to tie Ben Hogan, who won six consecutive starts in 1948, for the second-longest streak in professional golf history. Byron Nelson holds the all-time record with 11 consecutive wins in 1945.

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Tiger's win at Pebble that year marked the 17th of his career. Since then, he has won an eye-popping 63 more times. The Pebble triumph also was the second of Tiger's nine wins for the 2000 season, which included the first three legs of the "Tiger Slam" — the U.S. Open (also played at Pebble Beach that year, a major Woods won by a record 15 strokes), Open Championship and PGA Championship. He would complete that slam with his win at the Masters in 2001.

Woods fired an 8-under 64 in the final round and it included this incredible eagle hole-out at the par-4 15th from 97 yards:

 

Gogel, of course, gave Woods a little help with four bogeys over his final nine holes to lose by two.

"I'm not the first pro that has struggled on the back nine at Pebble, and won't be the last," said Gogel, 28 at the time. "Trying to win a golf tournament for the first time, battling the emotions, it was quite a test." 

Alan Shepard
NASA courtesy photo
Apollo 14 commander Alan Shepard completes experiments on the moon before his famous golf shots.

Talk about an out-of-this-world golf experience.

On Feb. 6, 1971 -- 48 years ago today -- Alan Shepard pulled out a makeshift six-iron he smuggled on board Apollo 14 and hit two golf balls on the lunar surface, becoming the first -- and only -- person to play golf anywhere other than Earth.

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The first American astronaut in space was named commander of Apollo 14 and wanted to do something special while on the moon. So he contacted a local club pro in Houston, who connected the head of a six-iron to the shaft of a piece of rock collecting equipment. Shepard then covered the club with a sock so it wouldn't be discovered before launch.

Only a handful of people in NASA knew of Shepard's plan when, after an extended excursion on the lunar surface, he pulled out the club, dropped two balls on the moon and proceeded to do this:

 

 

Shepard shanked the first ball, but estimated his second shot traveled more than 200 yards. Even though it seemed like a stunt at the time, Shepard admitted there was some science involved. With little atmosphere and much lower gravity, golf balls on the moon should travel much farther than on the earth.

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Shepard eventually donated the club to the USGA Museum in 1974. A replica is in the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. He eventually retired from the space program and lived in a home overlooking Cypress Point in Pebble Beach, Calif. He died in 1998.