Peter Lawrie kicks addiction that was ruining his life and golf game

Peter Lawrie
USA Today Sports Images
"I went from such a high on sugar to such a dramatic low" as he tried to quit drinking "liters a day" of soft drinks, says Peter Lawrie.
By John Holmes
PGA.com

Series: Golf Buzz

Published: Tuesday, February 17, 2015 | 11:52 a.m.
 
Peter Lawrie tied for 16th at the Maybank Malaysia Open a week ago, and couldn't have been happier. The 40-year-old Irishman wasn't celebrating a mere top-20 finish – he was celebrating the fact that his golf game is rounding back into shape after he kicked an addiction that had taken over his life. 
 
Lawrie, it turns out, had become addicted to soft drinks – so much so, he told the Irish radio station Newstalk, that he was drinking several liters per day of fizzy sodas. And when he tried to stop, it almost ruined him.
 
"I wouldn't say I went for a breakdown, but I definitely got exceptionally emotional" as he tried to quit cold turkey, he said in an interview that aired over the weekend. "Even in the hottest country, like Malaysia," he added, he would drink soda on the "golf course because I was addicted to it."
 
Lawrie – no relation to 1999 British Open winner Paul Lawrie of Scotland – was in the top 200 in the world after he tied for 10th place in the 2013 Irish Open. Soon after, he began trying to wean himself off the carbonated drinks, and his struggle sent him plummeting down the ranking – he fell as low as No. 909 after missing the cut in the South African Open in January.
 
 
"I went from such a high on sugar to such a dramatic low" in the weeks and months after the Irish Open, "and I never recovered from it," he said. "I lost all confidence in myself."
 
His results over the past 18 months or so dramatically illustrate how much trouble he was having. From that tie for 10th in the 2013 Irish Open through the end of 2014, he missed 33 cuts and had only eight finishes in the money. In 2014 alone, he made only six cuts in 27 European Tour starts and earned only $63,870.
 
"It was very difficult to deal with all of the situations coming at me," he told the radio station. 
 
This year, though, he's turned the corner. He's feeling better and his results on the course are rebounding. He's made each of his last three cuts, and he's already won almost as much money this year as he did in all of 2014.
 
Now, he says, he's only drinking two or three cans of soft drinks per day. And his tie for 16th place in Malaysia a week ago was his best finish since his ordeal began.