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Have More Fun Playing in the Rain

By Abby Parsons, PGA
Published on
Derek Berg fixes his umbrella on the 12th green during Final Round of the 41st National Car Rental Assistant PGA Professional Championship.

Derek Berg fixes his umbrella on the 12th green during Final Round of the 41st National Car Rental Assistant PGA Professional Championship.

Nothing beats playing a round of golf when it is sunny and 75; however, a lot of things may beat playing a round of golf in rain.
Even though it might be frustrating, having a good mentality in tougher conditions carries great importance when you’re looking to play well.
Begin with giving yourself a break. If rain is expected throughout the round, set new goals for the day. Understand that the precipitation will affect ball flight, spin, roll out, and even putting.
When water is added to the golf ball, the ball becomes slightly heavier as it flies in the air.
Expect the ball to fly shorter, so add that extra club or half a club. The humidity and wetness in the air create a denser air environment; therefore, assume the ball will travel at least three to five yards shorter. If you encounter the dreaded “mud ball,” hope it is a lift-clean-and-place day; if not, the extra club will be crucial to get the ball to travel its intended distance. 
Michael Auterson hits his shot during Final Round of the 41st National Car Rental Assistant PGA Professional Championship.
Michael Auterson hits his shot during Final Round of the 41st National Car Rental Assistant PGA Professional Championship.
When there is extra water on the club face and golf ball, the ball spins far less. You will notice a higher ball flight because the ball slips up on the club face with the added moisture, and no more of that cool backspin shot when you land on the green. Do not expect to pull off your favorite spin shot in a downpour because it will just roll out.
If you are a player who relies on a lot of roll-out on the fairway with your tee shot, sorry to disappoint, but you may have longer approach shots than usual in the rain. When the fairways soften, the ball lands on the grass and stays within a hula hoop of that landing area. This is something to consider when you decide what to hit off the tee when there is trouble to carry on a hole.
When putting in the rain, make sure the droplets falling off the bill of your hat do not bother you too much and that your rain gloves are tucked away in your pocket. Putting on a wet green will always be slower, and adding active rain to the roll does not help much either. Strike the putt harder than you usually would for every distance, even the tap-ins.
Now it is time to talk about the wardrobe. Make sure you own rain pants, a rain jacket, and rain gloves. Umbrellas are generally useless for many reasons. You cannot hold an umbrella over yourself while you swing so you are going to get wet. Who needs the extra weight of a cumbersome umbrella in the bag? Try your best to keep your grips and scorecard dry, as these items are crucial to a round of golf.
Lastly, take a moment to smile and enjoy being out on the course, regardless of what the weather is doing.
Playing golf in the rain is something every golfer should experience. It may be stressful but testing your ability with difficult conditions is a great way to become a better golfer overall.
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